Wall Street headhunter intel – Roblox’s big debut – Inside Truist’s digital transformation

Hello, readers!

Happy Saturday, and welcome to Insider Finance. Here’s a rundown of the must-know stories from the past week:

  • Moving season is in full swing on Wall Street. Here’s what 8 headhunters are seeing.
  • Roblox CEO Dave Baszucki told us why he found a direct listing the most “authentic” way to go public.
  • Goldman Sachs tells summer interns it’s hoping to provide some in-office experiences this year.
  • Truist execs map out the bank’s hybrid-cloud approach and new roboadvisor.

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Goldman Sachs is telling interns they may be coming into the office this summer

200 West Street the Goldman Sachs building in New York
People enter and exit 200 West Street the Goldman Sachs building in New York

Goldman Sachs is telling 2021 summer interns it hopes provide them some in-office experiences. It’s also partnering with online-learning company NovoEd to enable incoming interns to connect with one another virtually starting in early March.

Previously, Goldman CEO David Solomon emphasized his desire to train interns in person if possible. Read more here.


Roblox CEO Dave Baszucki told us why he doesn’t consider himself an IPO ‘rebel’

Roblox CEO David Baszucki
David Baszucki, founder and CEO of Roblox, presents at the Roblox Developer Conference on August 10, 2019 in Burlingame, California.

Video-game maker Roblox finally went public via a direct listing this week. Leading up to the debut, Roblox made a switch from its original plans to go public via a traditional IPO. In an interview with Insider, Roblox CEO Dave Baszucki said the pivot felt like “a natural way to do it.”

“We don’t feel like we’re a rebel at all,” Baszucki said. Read more here.


Here’s which Wall Street jobs are in the highest demand

rise in financial advisor hiring 2x1
Once the bonus season dust settles and cash hits the bank accounts, Wall Street laces up its running shoes. Now, everyone from up-and-comers to full-fledged rockstars is racing to assess their opportunities.

At the center of it all are Wall Street headhunters, who are working feverishly to supply the talent for new buildouts and initiatives their clients are prioritizing for 2021, as well as filling the vacancies elsewhere as stars are poached away.

We asked eight recruiters about the hottest sectors and trends they’re seeing. Here’s what they said.


Inside Truist’s tech transformation, from a hybrid-cloud approach to a new roboadvisor

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Dontá Wilson, Truist’s head of digital client experience, and Scott Case, Truist’s CIO

The 2019 merger of BB&T and SunTrust marked the largest bank deal since the financial crisis. Now the sixth-largest US bank, Truist has the size to go about a wholesale upgrade of its digital banking offerings through both internal development and external partnerships. Keep reading.


Other stories readers loved this week

  • Private-equity giant Vista is out fundraising as founder Robert Smith looks to move past his tax-evasion agreement
  • Fintech Acorns just nabbed Harvest as consolidation among personal-finance apps heats up
  • HSBC just tapped Google Cloud to roll out a chatbot that helps employees with their regulatory questions
  • American Airlines’ $10 bln lifeline is a strategy that could be replicated by industries like retail and hospitality
  • M1 Finance‘s CEO explains the fintech’s push to digitize the private bank experience
  • BlackRock just held a town hall to roll out its diversity and inclusion strategy. Here are all the details.
  • Carlson Capital has lost nearly $3 bln in assets and dozens of staffers over the last 2 years
Read the original article on Business Insider