The 44-year-old successor to billionaire ‘Bond King’ Bill Gross is retiring early to go on road trips with his kids. ‘The pandemic has caused everybody to reevaluate.’

Nick Maroutsos
Nick Maroutsos will retire from Janus Henderson Investors in October.

  • Nick Maroutsos, head of global bonds at Janus Henderson Investors, told Bloomberg he will retire in October.
  • The 44-year-old said the pandemic had made him reevaluate his life. He wanted to spend time with his kids, he said.
  • Maroutsos took over from legendary billionaire “Bond King” Bill Gross in 2019.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nick Maroutsos, head of global bonds at Janus Henderson Investors, is set to retire in October to take more road trips with his kids, after the pandemic caused him to reevaluate his “goals in life,” he told Bloomberg.

The 44-year-old investor took over from “Bond King” Bill Gross at Janus in 2019. The firm manages a $400-million portfolio.

He said he planned to spend more time with his wife and three children, and take his 14-year-old daughter to cross-country lacrosse tournaments. He wanted to spend more time with his kids while “they still like me,” he said.

“The pandemic has caused everybody to sort of reevaluate not just their career paths, but goals in life,” Maroutsos said. “I spent a lot of time thinking about that and where I want to be in the next 10 years.”

Maroutsos founded fixed-income investment company Kapstream Capital in 2007, which was bought by Janus eight years later. He manages the Janus Henderson Short Duration Income ETF, which has a $3 billion market capitalization.

Maroutsos said that, after spending 20 years working in fixed-income investments, now was a good time to “step back and hit the reset button.”

Maroutsos said he would work again at some point, but was not sure exactly where.

“In a year’s time, I will probably resurface in some capacity. I’m looking at things potentially outside of fixed income,” he said. “But I’m not good enough at other things, like either music or cooking, to do them.”

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