The 19 electric vehicles you can buy new right now, from Mini’s $30,000 hatchback to Porsche’s $185,000 super sedan

Mustang Mach E GT Performance Edition 03
The Mustang Mach-E is Ford’s first mass-market electric vehicle.

  • There are more electric options on the market than ever before.
  • The nearly 20 EVs you can buy new today range in price from under $30,000 to well over $100,000.
  • Some have a range of under 200 miles, while others can travel more than 400 miles between fill-ups.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

There’s never been a better time to shop for an electric vehicle.

Right now there are 19 new battery-powered models for sale in the US – and they run the gamut in terms of price, range, performance, size, and features. Plus, a sweeping infrastructure plan from Joe Biden may soon make buying and owning an EV cheaper and easier than ever thanks to investments in consumer rebates and charging stations.

EVs currently for sale include high-dollar luxury sedans like the Porsche Taycan and Tesla Model S, economical hatchbacks like the Mini Cooper SE and Chevrolet Bolt, and plenty in between. Drivers looking to make the switch from fossil fuels to zero emissions can consult this guide to learn a bit about the various EVs on the market, how much they cost, and what they can get for their budget.

Dozens more EVs are on the way, and this guide does not include vehicles that are still in the preorder phase, like the GMC Hummer EV, Rivian R1S, and Audi E-Tron GT.

Audi E-Tron – $65,900

Audi E-Tron.
Audi E-Tron.

The Audi E-Tron starts at around $66,000 and stretches up to just over $79,000 for the top trim. It’s powered by two electric motors – one on each axle – that put out 355 horsepower and 414 lb-ft of torque.

Things get a little less exciting as far as range is concerned. The crossover gets a range rating of 222 miles, which isn’t all that much for such a high-end vehicle.

Audi E-Tron Sportback – $69,100

Audi E-Tron Sportback.
Audi E-Tron Sportback.

The E-Tron has a sibling called the E-Tron Sportback. It comes with a roof that slopes down in the back at the expense of some trunk space.

It gets a range rating of 218 miles, slightly less than the standard E-Tron. Both crossovers benefit from a sport mode that can temporarily boost output to 402 horsepower, Audi says. They’ll be joined by the cheaper and more compact Q4 E-Tron and Q4 E-Tron Sportback toward the end of 2021.

BMW i3 – $44,450

2013 BMW i3.1
BMW i3.

The BMW i3 starts at $44,450 for an all-electric hatchback with 153 miles of range. There’s also a $47,650 version with a range-extending gas engine that brings the total range to 200 miles. The quirky car is BMW’s only EV in the US, but that’s about to change with the launch of the i4 sedan and iX SUV.

Chevrolet Bolt EV – $36,500

2020 Chevrolet BoltEV 002
Chevrolet Bolt EV.

The 2021 Chevy Bolt offers up a respectable 259 miles of range for a starting price of $36,500. But it’s worth waiting for the 2022 model, which can go just as far for nearly $5,000 less. The latest generation will also have a sleeker design and a crossover cousin.

Ford Mustang Mach-E – $42,895

All Electric Mustang Mach E
The Ford Mustang Mach-E.

Ford raised some eyebrows when it decided to lend its first EV the storied Mustang moniker. But the crossover has received heaps of praise since deliveries began in early 2021.

The Mach-E starts at $42,895 for the base model, which has an EPA-estimated range of 230 miles. Buyers can choose from several other trim levels, too, including a GT Performance model with 634 lb-ft of torque.

Hyundai Kona Electric – $37,390

2022 Hyundai Kona Electric.
2022 Hyundai Kona Electric.

Sharing a platform with the Kia Niro EV, the Kona Electric comes equipped with a 201-horsepower motor and a healthy 258-mile range. Hyundai revamped the model for 2022, giving it a sleeker design but no changes under the hood. It hasn’t said how much the updated version will cost.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric – $33,245

2021 Hyundai Ioniq Electric.
2021 Hyundai Ioniq Electric.

With a starting MSRP of $33,245, the 2021 Hyundai Ioniq Electric isn’t exactly cheap. But it’s still one of the least expensive EVs on the market.

The sedan comes in two trims – a $33,000 SE version and a $39,000 Limited model – both of which earn an EPA-rated range of 170 miles. The Ioniq also comes in hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants.

Jaguar I-Pace – $69,850

Jaguar I-Pace.
Jaguar I-Pace.

When it came to bringing an electric car to the US market, Jaguar beat bigger and more popular luxury brands like Mercedes and Audi to the punch. On sale since 2018, the all-wheel-drive I-Pace crossover puts out 394 horsepower and a hefty 512 lb-ft of torque, according to Jaguar. Its 90-kWh battery is good for a range of 234 miles, according to the EPA.

Kia Niro EV – $39,090

2020 Kia Niro EV.
2020 Kia Niro EV.

The Kia Niro EV launched in 2019 as an electric version of the gas-powered model of the same name. The compact crossover gets an EPA-estimated range of 239 miles and comes in two trims starting at $39,090 and $45,560.

Mini Cooper SE – $29,900

Mini Cooper SE.
Mini Cooper SE.

Surprising as it may be given that Mini is owned by BMW, the Mini Cooper SE is the cheapest electric car currently for sale in the US.

But that low MSRP means the electric Mini gets an EPA-estimated range of only 110 miles, far less than some of its pricier rivals. However, like its gas-powered siblings, the Mini Cooper SE is meant to be more of a city car than one for long highway journeys.

Read more:US buyers have exceptionally good credit scores right now – and they’re using them to spend more than ever on everyday cars

Nissan Leaf – $31,670

2021 Nissan Leaf.
2021 Nissan Leaf.

Launched in 2010, the Nissan Leaf is among the longest-running electric cars on the market today. The roughly $31,700 base model gets you an EPA-estimated 149 miles of range, while the $38,270 S Plus trim delivers 226 miles on a charge.

It was never the sleekest car on the block, but a 2017 refresh brought the Leaf’s styling up to date.

Polestar 2 – $59,900

2021 Polestar 2_KL_1
2021 Polestar 2.

Polestar may not be a household name just yet, but the luxury offshoot of Volvo and its Chinese parent, Geely, is making some of the best electrified cars on the market. Its debut EV, the Polestar 2, wasn’t just Insider’s favorite electric car of 2020, it was our favorite car, period.

The sleek $60,000 sedan has a range of 233 miles, according to the EPA. Plus, the car has lots going for it on the sustainability front aside from running on electrons rather than fossil fuels. Its seats, interior plastics, and carpets are made from recycled plastic bottles, discarded cork, and recycled fishing nets.

Porsche Taycan – $79,900

2021 Porsche Taycan._KL28
2021 Porsche Taycan.

Porsche dove into the EV market guns blazing in 2019 with its first-ever EV, the Taycan. The four-seat sedan currently comes in four versions, all of which offer outrageous specs.

The 402-horsepower base model – the only Taycan sedan with a single motor instead of a pair – costs around $80,000. Just under $104,000 gets you the Taycan 4s version with 227 miles of EPA-estimated driving range and 522 horsepower. Roughly $151,000 buys you the Turbo model with a 212-mile range and 670 horsepower. And the top of the line Turbo S version delivers 750 horsepower and a 0-60-mph time of 2.6 seconds – all for $185,000.

Tesla Model 3 – $38,490

Tesla Model 3.
Tesla Model 3.

The Model 3 may be Tesla’s entry-level sedan – costing less than half the price of some of its higher-end offerings – but that doesn’t mean it skimps on quality. Around $38,500 buys you the base model, which can travel 263 miles on a charge.

Buyers can shell out an extra $9,000 for a “Long-Range” model with an EPA-rated 353 miles of range. A $57,000 sport model blasts to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds, according to Tesla.

Read more: How much does a Tesla cost? Breaking down the Model S, 3, X, and Y

Tesla Model S – $79,990

Tesla Model S.
Tesla Model S.

Tesla’s second production vehicle and its longest-running model, the Model S has set the standard for EVs for nearly a decade. It proved that electric cars could be cool, and, arguably, kicked off the EV revolution that’s now in full swing.

A Model S will run you $80,000 to start, and two high-performance models are on offer for $120,000 and $150,000.

Tesla Model X – $89,990

Tesla Model X.
Tesla Model X.

The Model X is Tesla’s second-oldest offering behind the Model S. It comes with gull-wing doors, a dual-motor setup, and a 350-mile range, but it doesn’t come particularly cheap. A base Model X starts at around $90,000, and the high-performance “Plaid” version commands roughly $120,000.

Tesla Model Y – $50,490

Tesla Model Y.
Tesla Model Y.

The Model Y is Tesla’s newest model, going on sale in early 2020, and it’s already proved to be a hit. The crossover shares a lot with the Model 3, but it rides a bit higher and has some extra interior space. It starts at $50,490 for a “Long Range” model with 326 miles of range, but there’s also an off-menu “Standard Range” version that’s cheaper still.

Volkswagen ID.4 – $39,995

2021 Volkswagen ID.4.
2021 Volkswagen ID.4.

The Volkswagen Group is launching an all-out electric offensive in coming years, and the ID.4 crossover is its namesake brand’s debut EV for the US market. It pairs a friendly starting price of $39,995 with a respectable 250-mile range. Deliveries began in March.

Volvo XC-40 Recharge – $53,990

2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge.
2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge.

For its very first battery-powered vehicle, Volvo decided to electrify its popular compact crossover, the XC40. The XC40 Recharge gets an EPA-estimated range of 208 miles and a peppy 402-horsepower motor that can send it to 60 mph in under five seconds, Volvo says.

The Swedish brand plans to go fully electric by 2030.

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