How to AirDrop a file from your iPhone or iPad to a Mac computer

woman in robe working from laptop and phone
Once you’ve set up AirDrop on your Apple devices, you can send files back and forth with just a few taps.

  • AirDrop lets you quickly share and receive photos, videos, and more from other Apple devices nearby.
  • Before you use AirDrop, turn on sharing permissions in Finder on Mac and in Settings on iPhone or iPad.
  • Apple devices need to be in range of each other – about 30 feet – for AirDrop to work.
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Today it’s easier than ever to share files and photos across devices. With Apple devices, you can use AirDrop to send files – even ones too big for email – from an iPhone to a Mac or iPad with just a tap, as long as they are in range.

What’s in range? AirDrop uses a combination of both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to transmit files, so your iPhone, iPad, or Mac have to be within about 30 feet of each other.

Here’s everything you need to know about AirDrop and how to use it.

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What is an Ethernet cable? Here’s how to connect to the internet without Wi-Fi and get a speedier connection

ethernet cable being plugged into internet router
Ethernet cables, which connect your devices directly to your internet router, can speed up your connection.

  • An Ethernet cable lets you physically connect your computer to the internet.
  • Ethernet connections are almost always faster than Wi-Fi connections, and are usually more stable.
  • You’ll need to connect one end of the Ethernet cable to your router, and the other to your computer.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

The majority of users access the internet using wireless devices, like phones or laptops. These devices connect to the internet using Wi-Fi, wireless signals that broadcast throughout your house.

But if you’ve been using the internet for a while – or you have a desktop computer that you don’t use Wi-Fi for – you’ll probably be using an Ethernet cable instead. Ethernet cables are wires that physically connect your computer to a router or modem.

Ethernet cables can seem clunky or restricting, but they can substantially improve the speed and stability of your internet.

Here’s what you need to know about Ethernet cables, how they work, and what makes them a handy alternative to Wi-Fi.

An Ethernet cable ‘hardwires’ your computer to an internet connection

An Ethernet cable, sometimes referred to as a network cable, is a cord that runs from a router, modem, or network switch to your computer, giving your device access to the local area network (LAN) – in other words, giving it internet access.

 

The benefit of hardwiring your internet connection is that it’s faster and more consistent. Without walls or other objects blocking your Wi-Fi signals, you don’t have to worry about sudden drops in internet speed.

Gaming with an Ethernet cable means less lag and faster loading times for multiplayer games. And every major game console can connect with an Ethernet port – although to connect a Nintendo Switch, you’ll need an adapter.

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Ethernet cables come in sizes as long or short as you’d need.

Just be careful not to unplug your cable while you’re using it, as doing so will disconnect you from the internet instantly. Luckily, Ethernet cables are made to snap snugly into place, so it’s hard to pull them out accidentally.

Ethernet cables come in a range of lengths and colors, but both sides of the cord are the same, regardless of the brand of cable or device you’re hardwiring.

Amazon ethernet cable
Ethernet cables are double-sided.

Ethernet accessories can help you connect any device

Although newer, slender models of laptops don’t tend to have Ethernet ports, you can still utilize an Ethernet cable with a USB or USB-C adapter.

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Ethernet adapters can convert to USB, seen here, or USB-C.

Another common accessory to pair with an Ethernet cable is a network switch. This add-on lets you convert an Ethernet connection into multiple ones, allowing you to, for instance, hardwire both your Xbox and Chromecast to the internet at the same time.

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A network switch, which connects to the router via Ethernet, allows multiple devices to be hardwired to the internet at once.

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Is Ethernet faster than Wi-Fi? Yes, and a hardwired connection offers other benefits as well

couple unpacking hooking up internet ethernet cable
Though they can be less convenient, Ethernet cables are typically much faster than Wi-Fi.

  • Ethernet is typically faster than a Wi-Fi connection, and it offers other advantages as well. 
  • A hardwired Ethernet cable connection is more secure and stable than Wi-Fi.
  • You can test your computer’s speeds on Wi-Fi versus an Ethernet connection easily.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

The advent of Wi-Fi was a great thing. It has granted easier internet access in harder-to-reach areas, made connecting new devices a breeze – and not to mention, reduced the amount of cables on our floors.

However, if you’re looking for the fastest and most consistent connection possible, you should still stick with an Ethernet cable. It’s less convenient, but boasts all sorts of advantages.

Ethernet is almost always faster than Wi-Fi

If you want a fast connection, you should consider connecting as many of your devices as possible to Ethernet. This is because Ethernet is nearly always faster than a Wi-Fi connection from the same router.

It’s true that radio waves are incredibly fast. But an Ethernet cable lets your devices send and receive data almost instantaneously. This is especially true if you have a fiber-optic connection.

This also means that it doesn’t matter how close or far you are from your router. As long as your Ethernet cable reaches, you’ll see little to no loss in speed.

You can compare Wi-Fi and Ethernet speeds by running a quick speed test using both connections. You’ll almost certainly find the Ethernet connection to be faster.

speed tes
According to testmy.net, internet download speed is almost doubled on this device when using an Ethernet cable, at 310.2 Mbps, compared to 164 Mbps without.

Our own quick test showed an Ethernet download speed almost double that of Wi-Fi.

Ethernet is more stable than a Wi-Fi signal

To use an analogy, an Ethernet cable is to Wi-Fi what a landline is to a cell phone. Rather than transmitting the signal wirelessly, an Ethernet cable carries your data via a cable electronically.

ethernet cable connected to laptop internet
Some laptops have an Ethernet port built in, while others – especially Macs – require a special adapter.

In short, this means that the data is less likely to get lost or degrade along the way. You also don’t have to worry about the signal being blocked or slowed down by nearby electronics or barriers.

Unless your Ethernet cable physically breaks, there’s not much that can disrupt it, short of a power outage. 

Ethernet connections are likely more secure than Wi-Fi

Although a clever Wi-Fi network name like “FBI Surveillance Van” might dissuade some neighbors from trying to hack your network, you’re still more secure with an Ethernet connection.

Any Wi-Fi password can be hacked with enough effort, and since Wi-Fi signals pass through the open air, they can be intercepted. But to gain access to an Ethernet connection, you need to have the cable and the router. There’s no way to hack into Ethernet without a physical connection.

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Homeless parents’ lawsuit forcing New York City to provide WiFi for 114,000 homeless students will head to trial

homeless outside shelter in LA/coronavirus
  • A federal judge advanced a lawsuit to expedite the roll-out of WiFi to homeless shelters across the city.
  • There are more than 114,000 homeless students in New York City. 
  • The class-action suit was filed on behalf of homeless students across the city who have been unable to access the internet in homeless shelters during periods of remote learning this year. 
  • The city provided students with iPads with unlimited cellular data, but many students have had trouble getting proper cell service. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A lawsuit aimed at forcing New York City to provide WiFi for students in homeless shelters is moving forward to trial.

US District Judge Alison Nathan ruled last week that the class-action suit brought by homeless parents and the Coalition of the Homeless would proceed to expedited discovery in preparation for a trial.

“Without internet connectivity, homeless students are deprived of the means to attend classes,” Nathan wrote in the opinion that accompanied the decision. “And because homeless children who lack internet access and reside in New York City shelters cannot attend school for as long as that deprivation exists, the City bears a duty, under the statute, to furnish them with the means necessary for them to attend school.” 

Some homeless students are still unable to access the internet from a shelter more than nine months since Mayor Bill de Blasio first announced remote learning on March 15, 2020 at the start of the coronavirus pandemic lockdown. New York City schools have approximately 114,000 homeless students according to an Advocates for Children report cited by the judge.

The city’s original plan was to provide iPads with unlimited cellular data to students without access to WiFi, first partnering with T-Mobile. After students weren’t able to access T-Mobile service in many shelters, the city switched to Verizon, but some students continued to be unable to connect to school. 

On October 26, 2020 Mayor de Blasio announced that the city would install WiFi in all shelters, but officials cautioned this wouldn’t be complete until the summer of 2021. 

“It should come as no surprise that the City lacked any real legal basis to prevent this lawsuit from proceeding,” said Susan Horwitz, supervising attorney of the education law project at the Legal Aid Society, wrote in a press release.

“Despite months of pushing the City to address the root cause of the problem, City Hall continues to advance ineffective solutions while families in shelters suffer. We look forward to seeing all shelters equipped with working WiFi, far in advance of the city’s stated goal of summer 2021.” 

City officials said they are working to get Wifi to students in shelters.

“The court’s decision indicates that the city has worked hard to provide internet connectivity to the plaintiffs and is continuing to do so,” Paolucci, the spokesperson of New York City’s Law Department, wrote to Law & Crime.

Paolucci has not yet responded to Insider’s request for comment. 

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10 ways to troubleshoot and fix any Wi-Fi problems you’re encountering

teen checking wifi internet connection
If your Wi-Fi isn’t working, follow these troubleshooting tips before calling your service provider.

  • When you encounter Wi-Fi problems, you can try troubleshooting your network or devices, check with your internet service provider, and more.
  • Start by eliminating obvious problems and making sure you know whether it’s related to the Wi-Fi network, internet connection, one device or all devices. 
  • Here are 10 ways to troubleshoot and solve Wi-Fi problems.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

It can be hard to imagine or remember the days before Wi-Fi, when you had to run Ethernet cables throughout the house to connect computers to the internet and carry files around on CDs and portable hard drives (affectionately known as “sneakernet”). 

These days, we take Wi-Fi for granted – right up until it stops working and brings our modern connected household to a complete stop. 

How to fix Wi-Fi problems

Here are 10 ways to troubleshoot and solve common Wi-Fi problems. 

Basic check: Is the Wi-Fi router running?

It’s not out of the question for the plug to have been accidentally pulled or the cat to have stepped on the power button. Make sure the Wi-Fi router’s lights are on. 

Is the issue related to one device or all devices?

Fixing computer problems like Wi-Fi connection issues often comes down to the process of elimination. That’s why technical support technicians often start by asking silly and obvious questions like “is the computer plugged in?” Once you know the Wi-Fi is running, check to see if the problem happens on just one device or on all of them. If you can’t connect on your laptop, for example, check your phone to see if you can see Wi-Fi signal strength bars.  

How_to_fix_Wi Fi_problems 1
Can’t connect to Wi-Fi with your computer? Make sure you have a solid connection on your phone – or vice-versa.

Send a ping to Google

One other easy thing you can check for: is the connection problem related to your Wi-Fi network or to your internet service provider’s internet signal? Your Wi-Fi network might be fine, for example, but the ISP’s internet may be out. To find out, run a ping test using a computer. 

1. On your PC, click the Start button search box and type “CMD,” then press Enter. 

2. In the Command Prompt window, type “ping Google.com.”

3. Wait for the result. 

How_to_fix_Wi Fi_problems 2
If you can see a ping from Google, your internet is working and the problem is with your Wi-Fi network.

If you see an error message, you might not have a working internet connection; continue troubleshooting in the next section. If you see a reply from Google, then you have a working internet connection and the problem lies elsewhere. 

You can also log into your account for your internet service provider to check if there’s an outage in your area. With many providers, a banner will appear at the top of your account page notifying you of an outage, or you can search for an outage map on the site.

Troubleshooting no service at all

This is unfortunately one of the more common problems people run into – the internet simply doesn’t work at all. If none of the devices or computers on your Wi-Fi network can connect, reset both the internet router and Wi-Fi (this might be one device or two different ones). Unplug them, wait two minutes, and plug them back in. If your Wi-Fi doesn’t start working again, the problem might be with your internet service provider – call customer service and let them troubleshoot. 

Resolving slow or spotty internet in certain rooms

If your Wi-Fi drops out in certain parts of the house on a regular basis, the problem is almost certainly a “dead zone” caused by a router that can’t reach everywhere. If possible, move the router to a more central location in the house. Alternatively, you can add a Wi-Fi extender to increase the range of your router. 

Troubleshooting slow or spotty internet at certain times of day

If your connection problem isn’t related to where you are in the house but is an intermittent problem at certain times of the day, the issue is likely related to a lack of bandwidth; too many devices are connected to the Wi-Fi network and using too much data. If three people are streaming Netflix on different devices at the same time, for example, there’s your culprit. If possible, connect devices with an Ethernet cable so they aren’t using Wi-Fi, or better yet, take one or more bandwidth hogs offline entirely. 

Is your connection slow because of the Wi-Fi network or the ISP?

If you have a connection that’s noticeably slow, it can also be helpful to figure out if your poor performance is being caused by a slow internet connection provided by your ISP or if the Wi-Fi network in your home is not working properly. You can do this by running an internet speed test. Run the test at speedtest.net in any browser (on a computer or mobile device). If the internet speed seems normal (at least 10Mbps, for example) the issue is related to your Wi-Fi network, not the internet. Read our detailed guide on how to check the strength of your Wi-Fi for more information.

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Run a speed test to make sure your internet is working properly.

How to resolve issues with your router

It can be challenging to know exactly what is causing a problem with your Wi-Fi connection, and the router itself has some settings and configurations that might be “breaking” your Wi-Fi network. If possible, check on and update your router’s firmware. Most modern routers work with a simple mobile app you can use to check on the firmware and install any available updates. This can resolve issues with your connection reliability and speed. In addition, you can probably use the app to change the channels your router is using to broadcast on its various bands. If your connection is slow or intermittent, changing the channels might significantly improve your Wi-Fi service. For more information, read our article on how to boost your internet connection.

What to do if one device has trouble connecting

Make sure the device’s software is up to date. And if your router is a dual-band or tri-band device, try connecting to one of the other Wi-Fi bands. There are any number of reasons why a laptop might connect more easily to one of the 5GHz radios rather than the other, for example. 

What to do if your game console can’t connect to Wi-Fi

Occasionally, consoles like the Xbox and PS4 can run into trouble connecting to Wi-Fi. Consoles can be affected by the same kind of glitches that affect PCs and mobile devices, but they generally only need to go to one internet location, so troubleshooting can be easier. Open a site like Downdetector in a web browser on your computer or a mobile device and use it to see if the Playstation Network or Xbox Live is down. If so, just wait for the site to come back up. Otherwise, reboot both the router and the console and move them closer together, if possible. 

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Downdetector will reveal if the problem with your console’s Wi-Fi connection is actually at the server.

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