Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp says that voters waiting in long lines can order from Uber Eats

Brian Kemp
Gov. Brian Kemp (R-Georgia) speaks during an April 3 news conference in Atlanta about Major League Baseball’s decision to move the 2021 All-Star Game over the league’s objection to the state’s new voting law.

  • Gov. Brian Kemp suggested that voters waiting in long lines could order food from delivery apps.
  • “They can order a pizza,” he said. “They can order Grubhub or Uber Eats, right?”
  • Kemp then accused Democratic-led jurisdictions of mismanaging their elections.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

GOP Gov. Brian Kemp of Georgia suggested in a Newsmax interview earlier this week that voters waiting in line to vote could order food from online delivery apps like Grubhub or Uber Eats, as he continues to face blowback for the 2021 MLB All-Star Game leaving the state over its newly-enacted voting law.

The law, known as the Election Integrity Act of 2021 or SB 202, tightens election rules in the state by limiting drop boxes, strengthening voter identification requirements, and banning water and food from being distributed by volunteers to voters waiting in line, among other measures. It has been slammed by prominent Democrats including President Joe Biden and former Georgia state House Minority Leader and potential 2022 gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

Several major companies – including Coca-Cola and Delta – have spoken out against the bill or voter suppression more broadly, which has upset Kemp and most statewide Republicans, who say the law is being distorted.

Kemp addressed one of the more contentious aspects of the law, which bars volunteers from distributing water or food to voters in line.

“They can order a pizza,” Kemp said of voters waiting to vote. “They can order Grubhub or Uber Eats, right?”

He added: “The county officials can provide water stations. This is just within 150 feet of the precinct. If you’re 151 feet, campaigns can set up tables, food trucks … they can hang up flyers and set up signs. This is all they [Democrats] have to grasp at.”

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

Kemp then accused Democratic-led jurisdictions of bungling their own election administration.

“The question too that you need to ask … Why are voters standing in line that long?,” he said. “It’s because it’s in Democratic-controlled counties. They need to do a better job of running their elections and moving people through the lines so that they’re not standing out there so long. Voters should be furious that that’s the case.”

Last year, a ProPublica and Georgia Public Broadcasting investigation found that the cause of the state’s voting issues were the state’s population growth, which has been accelerated by new residents in the blue-trending Atlanta suburbs, along with a failure to increase the number of polling precincts.

The report showed that while the state’s voting rolls had increased by 2 million people since 2013, polling locations have declined by 10 percent, especially in the populous Atlanta metropolitan region.

GOP Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger asked for additional resources and polling precincts after being elected in 2018, but was unable to push legislation through the GOP-led legislature before the 2020 presidential election, which saw Biden win the state by roughly 12,000 votes.

During the Democratic presidential primary held in the state last June, The Guardian spoke with Simone Alisa, an Atlanta voter who waited for five hours to vote after initially expecting that she might only have to wait 30 minutes.

“Something’s wrong with this picture,” she said after finally casting her vote.

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Ohio Secretary of State blasts Tim Cook as ‘elite’ and says the Apple CEO’s idea of voting on iPhones is ‘preposterous’

Tim Cook, Apple CEO
Apple CEO Tim Cook.

Apple CEO Tim Cook’s hopes for a future where Americans can vote on their iPhones is “preposterous,” according to Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose.

In an interview with Fox News, LaRose said the idea is, “a classic example of one of these, kind of, elites, thinking they have a simple solution to a complex problem.”

Cook suggested the concept in a recent interview with The New York Times, published just days after Cook joined a growing coalition of business leaders who criticized a restrictive new Georgia voting law.

“I would dream of that, because I think that’s where we live,” Cook said when asked if tech would be the answer to some modern voting issues, like accusations of fraud. “We do our banking on phones. We have our health data on phones. We have more information on a phone about us than is in our houses. And so why not?”

Read more: The 11 biggest hacks and breaches of the past decade that are still causing reverberating damage

LaRose’s major criticisms ranged from identifying the phone’s user to technological competence. “You have to have the technological competence to do it right,” he said in reference to America’s biggest smartphone maker and one of the world’s most profitable companies. “And that may exist sometime in the near future, but it is more complicated than people realize.”

In the Times interview, Cook argued that current voting systems in America are “pretty arcane,” and that allowing people to vote on their smartphone could expand the reach and accessibility of voting to more Americans.

“I think we’re probably all having the wrong conversation on voting rights. We should be talking about using technology,” he said.

Of the voting age population in the US, just shy of 67% voted in the 2020 presidential electionthe highest percentage of any election in over 100 years.

“How can we make it so simple that our voting participation gets to 100? Or it gets really close to 100. Maybe we get in the 90s or something,” Cook said.

While LaRose agreed with Cook on expanding voting availability, he wasn’t convinced that iPhones are the path forward.

“Trying something untested, like voting on iPhones,” he said, could result, “in a loss of confidence” among voters.

Though voting through smartphone could expand accessibility for some voters, cybersecurity experts speaking to CBS News last November listed a number of ways it could also disenfranchise other voters: Security issues, the cost of iPhones, internet access, and voter identification were all among the main issues cited.

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

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McConnell says the quiet part out loud, tells corporate America to ‘stay out of politics,’ but clarifies he’s ‘not talking about political contributions’

GettyImages mitch mcconnell
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

  • Mitch McConnell warned corporations to “stay out of politics” at a Monday news conference.
  • His comments came after a slew of corporations spoke out against Georgia’s restrictive voting law.
  • But Tuesday, McConnell clarified, saying he wasn’t “talking about political contributions. “
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has made it clear he wants corporate CEOs to stay out of politics. Unless that is, they’re putting money in politicians’ campaigns.

The senator from Kentucky chastised American corporations Monday, suggesting the companies’ leaders need to stop speaking out about Georgia’s restrictive new voting law, warning there could be consequences for those that continue to do so.

“My advice to the corporate CEOs of America is to stay out of politics. Don’t pick sides in these big fights,” McConnell said at a news conference Monday.

Twitter users and journalists were quick to point out McConnell’s status as a longtime recipient of corporate donations, outstripping most other members of Congress by some measures when it came to political donations.

But McConnell rebuked any suggestions of hypocrisy Tuesday, clarifying his original statements and carving out an exception for political contributions.

“I’m not talking about political contributions,” McConnell said during a stop at a Kentucky health clinic Tuesday. “I’m talking about taking a position on a highly incendiary issue like this and punishing a community or a state because you don’t like a particular law they passed. I just think it’s stupid.”

Major League Baseball announced last week that it would no longer host its 2021 All-Star Game in Atlanta in the wake of Georgia’s new voting law, which Civil Rights activists have criticized as suppressing voters and in particular, Black voters.

Many corporations followed suit, including major Georgia-based companies like Coca-Cola, Delta, and Home Depot.

Republicans have slammed the MLB’s decision and the onslaught of corporate responses, calling for boycotts and threatening tax hikes to punish companies that have spoken out.

On Monday, McConnell accused corporations that oppose the law of acting like a “woke alternative government,” saying it would “invite serious consequences if they became a vehicle for far-left mobs to hijack our country from outside the constitutional order.”

But the minority leader, who received more than $3 million in corporate PAC donations during the 2020 election cycle, according to OpenSecrets, was careful in his language Tuesday, saying businesses have a “right to participate in the political process.”

“Most of them contribute to both sides, they have political action committees, that’s fine, it’s legal, I support that,” he said.

The Citizens United supreme court ruling from 2010 said that “independent political spending” was protected as part of the First Amendment.

According to MarketWatch, McConnell received $258,880 from CEOs and S&P 500 companies during the 2020 cycle – more than any other candidate in a competitive Senate race that year.

However, when it comes to the First Amendment right to free speech not curtailed by Congress, while not issuing punishment, McConnell did issue a warning: “If I were running a major corporation, I would stay out of politics,” adding that the corporations are “irritating a hell of a lot of Republican fans.”

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The ‘laughable’ comparison between Colorado and Georgia voting requirements

GettyImages 1229498887
Election workers validate ballots at the Gwinnett County Elections Office on Friday, Nov. 6, 2020 in Lawrenceville, GA.

  • Fox News and Republican politicians are comparing Colorado’s voting laws to Georgia’s.
  • But that comparison is “laughable,” said Paul Teske of the University of Colorado, Denver.
  • Colorado has fully embraced voting by mail, automatically sending ballots to all registered voters.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When Major League Baseball announced it was moving its All-Star Game from Georgia to protest new restrictions on voting, local Republicans and conservative media outlets bemoaned the rise of “woke capital” and created a false equivalence. Colorado, they said – the game’s new home – was really no better when it comes to voting rights.

“I think it’s a little bit laughable,” Paul Teske, dean of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver, told Insider of the comparison. “Colorado is such an easy place to vote.”

Georgia is not so easy, and it will now become more difficult.

Among other things, Georgia’s new elections law, passed by the state’s Republican-led legislature following a campaign by party leaders to paint the 2020 election as fraudulent, curtails the use of mail-in ballots. While before voters had up to six months before an election to request a ballot, they now have 11 weeks, and will have fewer drop boxes to cast their vote.

Crucially, people who vote by mail will also have to provide a driver’s license or other state-issued identification card, similar to the requirement for in-person voting. Previously, poll workers simply checked signatures to make sure they matched those on file – a process that, according to Georgia’s Republican elections officials, uncovered no real fraud.

That, according to GOP Gov. Brain Kemp, is no different than Colorado. In an appearance on Fox News this week, Kemp said he was confused by MLB’s decision to move its All-Star contest to Colorado where, “I’m being told, they also have a photo ID requirement.”

He was told wrong.

What counts as an “ID” in the Rocky Mountains is not the same as in Georgia. According to Colorado’s Secretary of State, acceptable forms of identification include not just those issued by the state or federal government, but those printed by colleges and universities. Don’t have one of those, either? Not a problem: the state also accepts utility bills, bank statements, and paycheck stubs.

In 2020, a super-majority of voters in Colorado cast their ballots by mail – all registered voters receive them automatically, as they have for years prior to the pandemic, with bipartisan support.

“The truth is Colorado’s election model works,” Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, said in a statement on Tuesday. “[T]he proof is in voter turnout, consistently among the top in the nation,” she said, adding the state is “grateful that MLB is giving us the opportunity to showcase how elections can be.”

Mail-in ballots can also be deposited at any time; as Colorado Public Radio notes, there is one drop box for every 9,400 active registered voters, available 24 hours a day. By contrast, the new law in Georgia actually caps the number of drop boxes for ballots to one per 100,000 voters, while limiting accessibility. It also requires Georgians to provide ID every time they vote absentee, not just when they initially register (the state, previously, compared signatures, as they do in Colorado).

Nevertheless, Kemp’s false claim was provided journalistic cover. Fox News, for example, published a story stating that, “As it turns out, Colorado also requires voters to show identification when voting in person.” The outlet’s Peter Doocy, at a White House briefing, likewise asked Biden spokesperson Jen Psaki if the administration was concerned about the MLB game moving to Colorado, “where voting regulations are very similar to Georgia.”

Psaki rebutted the comparison. “It’s important to remember the context here,” she added. “The Georgia bill is built on a lie.”

Indeed, the new Georgia law comes not after evidence of voter fraud – the state’s Republican elections officials uncovered none that would alter the outcome of the 2020 election – but a concerted effort by a former president and other GOP politicians to invalidate ballots cast for Democrats.

“It’s just abundantly clear, from the outside looking in, that they had some close elections but they lost,” Teske said, “and so the Republican legislature is looking to restrict voting in ways that they think will help them win elections in the future.”

“That is not a great way to have a democracy,” he added.

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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Tim Cook wants Americans to be able to vote on their iPhones

Tim Cook, Apple CEO
Apple CEO Tim Cook attends the world premiere of Apple’s “The Morning Show” at David Geffen Hall on Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, in New York City.

Would you feel comfortable voting via iPhone?

Apple CEO Tim Cook suggested that concept in a new interview with The New York Times, published just days after Cook joined a growing coalition of business leaders who criticized a restrictive new Georgia voting law.

“I would dream of that, because I think that’s where we live,” Cook said when Swisher asked if the tech would be the answer to some modern voting issues, like fraud. “We do our banking on phones. We have our health data on phones. We have more information on a phone about us than is in our houses. And so why not?”

America’s voting systems are notoriously low-tech, which stands in glaring contrast to modern systems of banking, commerce, and healthcare.

“It’s pretty arcane,” Cook said of America’s voting apparatus. “I think we’re probably all having the wrong conversation on voting rights. We should be talking about using technology.”

Read more: The 11 biggest hacks and breaches of the past decade that are still causing reverberating damage

Incorporating updated technology – like iPhones – in the voting process could expand the reach and accessibility of voting to more Americans, he argued.

Of the voting age population in the US, just shy of 67% voted in the 2020 presidential electionthe highest percentage of any election in over 100 years.

“How can we make it so simple that our voting participation gets to 100? Or it gets really close to 100. Maybe we get in the 90s or something,” Cook said.

Though voting through smartphone could expand accessibility for some voters, cybersecurity experts speaking to CBS News last November listed a number of ways it could also disenfranchise other voters: Security issues, the cost of iPhones, internet access, and voter identification were all among the main issues cited.

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Mitch McConnell says big companies like MLB ‘must stop taking cues from the Outrage-Industrial Complex’ when it comes to voting laws

Mitch McConnell
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., listens as the Senate Rules Committee holds a hearing on the “For the People Act,” which would expand access to voting and other voting reforms, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

  • Mitch McConnell slammed big companies for “taking cues from the Outrage-Industrial Complex” on voting.
  • A number of major corporations have spoken out or taken action over Georgia’s new voting law.
  • McConnell said that “businesses must not use economic blackmail to spread disinformation” on voting.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell blasted large companies and corporations for fueling a campaign to “mislead and bully the American people” about voting laws in a scathing Monday statement.

A number of major corporations both based within and outside of the state of Georgia have spoken out to criticize a major new voting law in the state.

The nearly 100-page Election Integrity Act was passed along party lines and signed by Gov. Brian Kemp, who defended the bill passed by Republicans as an effort to fix problems from the last election. The expansive legislation affects nearly every aspect of Georgia’s voting and election system, touching on everything from absentee and early voting, ballot drop boxes, runoffs, the composition and authority of the State Elections Board, and restrictions on volunteers delivering food and water to voters waiting in lines.

McConnell and other conservatives have criticized major corporations for adopting Democrats’ misleading claims about what the bill actually does and comparing it, as President Joe Biden did, to “Jim Crow on steroids.”

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

“Our private sector must stop taking cues from the Outrage-Industrial Complex. Americans do not need or want big business to amplify disinformation or react to every manufactured controversy with frantic left-wing signaling,” McConnell said.

McConnell scolded “parts of the private sector” for “dabbling in behaving like a woke parallel government,” warning that the companies “will invite serious consequences if they become a vehicle for far-left mobs to hijack our country from outside the constitutional order.”

He added: “Businesses must not use economic blackmail to spread disinformation and push bad ideas that citizens reject at the ballot box.”

McConnell lost his job as Senate majority leader due to Democrats winning back two US Senate seats in Georgia in a pair of dual January 5 runoffs, giving Democrats 50-50 control of the Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris as the tie-breaking vote.

After pressure from activists and Democrats in the state, a number of large companies based in Georgia have spoken out against the law.

Delta’s CEO Ed Bastian reversed course after initially releasing a statement tepidly praising the legislature’s work on the bill, later calling the legislation “unacceptable” and “based on a lie”

The CEO of Coca-Cola, another major company based in Atlanta, issued a statement saying: “we want to be crystal clear and state unambiguously that we are disappointed in the outcome of the Georgia voting legislation.”

Notably, many of the companies and CEOs who spoke out have only issued vague statements decrying voter suppression and emphasizing their commitment to democracy, with few listing objections to specific provisions of the bill. Microsoft’s Brad Smith singled out new regulations and limits on ballot drop boxes (which did not exist in Georgia before 2020 and are now codified into state law), reducing the window to request absentee ballots, and banning most out-of-precinct provisional ballots from being counted.

The Major League Baseball organization took the most drastic step yet of any big business by pulling the 2021 All-Star Game out of Georgia, citing the new voting law. It is unclear where the flagship game will be held instead.

Sports leagues have previously wielded their economic might against state laws they find objectionable in the past decade. In 2016, the NCAA pulled all its scheduled championship events from North Carolina over the state legislature passing a bill targeting its transgender residents.

McConnell also called out Biden for repeatedly misrepresenting the bill’s provisions around early voting hours. Biden’s repeated false claim that the bill ends voting at 5 pm earned him a Four Pinocchio rating from the Washington Post’s fact-checker.

“It’s jaw-dropping to see powerful American institutions not just permit themselves to be bullied, but join in the bullying themselves,” McConnell said. “There is no consistent or factual standard being applied here.”

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Donald Trump has expanded his list of ‘woke’ companies to boycott, due to their opposition of Georgia’s voting law

Trumps and Obamas
Melania and Donald Trump share a moment with Barack and Michelle Obama at Trump’s inauguration ceremony in January 2017.

  • Donald Trump has spoken out again about the companies that oppose Georgia’s new voting law.
  • He called for more boycotts, saying “don’t go back to their products until they relent.”
  • Barack Obama, meanwhile, commended the MLB on its decision to move its All-Star Game from Atlanta.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump doubled down on his criticism of companies that oppose Georgia’s new voting law, and widened his appeal for more boycotts.

“Never submit, never give up!” Trump said. In a statement, he added that his political opponents – the “Radical Left Democrats” – had long used brand boycotts to send messages.

“It is finally time for Republicans and Conservatives to fight back – we have more people than they do – by far! Boycott Major League Baseball, Coca-Cola, Delta Airlines, JPMorgan Chase, ViacomCBS, Citigroup, Cisco, UPS, and Merck. Don’t go back to their products until they relent. We can play the game better than them,” Trump said.

Trump was in opposition to another former president, Barack Obama, who supported Major League Baseball’s (MLB) decision to move its 2021 All-Star Game.

“Congratulations to @MLB for taking a stand on behalf of voting rights for all citizens. There’s no better way for America’s pastime to honor the great Hank Aaron, who always led by example,” Obama said on Twitter.

Sun Trust Park Major League Baseball Atlanta Georgia
Sun Trust Park in Atlanta, Georgia.

Elsewhere, Republican National Committee chair, Ronna McDaniel, said she was skipping MLB broadcasts.

“Guess what I am doing today? Not watching baseball!!!!” she said on Twitter.

MLB’s decision to move the game could cost the Atlanta economy about $100 million in lost revenue, Holly Quinlan, a local tourism official, told CNN on Saturday.

Georgia voting rights activist Stacey Abrams said she supported the league’s decision, but didn’t “want to see Georgia families hurt by lost events and jobs.”

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp, who signed the bill, told Fox News that New York voting laws were more restrictive than those in Georgia.

“Major League Baseball may be scared of Joe Biden and Stacey Abrams, but we’re not. We will continue to fight to make it easy to vote and hard to cheat in Georgia,” Kemp said on Twitter.

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More than 70 top Black business leaders are reportedly urging US companies to fight against Republican voting laws

Kenneth Chenault speaks onstage in 2018 and Merck CEO, Kenneth Frazier, speaks at a briefing on the production of the Covid-19 vaccine in 2021
Kenneth Chenault speaks onstage in 2018 and Merck CEO, Kenneth Frazier, speaks at a briefing on the production of the Covid-19 vaccine in 2021

  • 72 Black executives are urging US companies to speak out about new voting laws, the NYT reports.
  • They claim the new bill, being advanced by Republicans, could restrict the rights of Black voters.
  • Former American Express CEO, Kenneth Chenault and Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier are in charge of the letter.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Top Black business leaders in the US are calling on companies to fight against restrictive voting rights laws being put in place in at least 43 states, according to a report from The New York Times on Wednesday.

So far, 72 Black executives have signed a letter to American firms, urging them to publicly oppose new laws by Republicans that they said would restrict the rights of Black voters. It comes after Georgia signed a bill on March 25 that the business leaders allege is discriminatory against Black voters.

Former American Express CEO, Kenneth Chenault, who is now a director at Berkshire Hathaway, and Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier are spearheading the letter about the new voting bill, known as SB 202, or the Election Integrity Act of 2021.

Robert F. Smith, CEO of Vista Equity Partners, Mellody Hobson and John Rogers Jr., the co-chief executives of Ariel Investments, Raymond McGuire, a former Citigroup executive, and Roger Ferguson Jr., the chief executive of TIAA, are among the 72 signatories, the Times reported.

“As Black business leaders, we cannot sit silently in the face of this gathering threat to our nation’s democratic values and allow the fundamental right of Americans, to cast their votes for whomever they choose, to be trampled upon yet again,” the letter said, per a CNN report.

“We call upon our colleagues in Corporate America to join us in taking a non-partisan stand for equality and democracy. Each of us stands ready to work with you on what can and must be done,” it said.

Read more: I asked MyPillow whether it sells customer data to political committees. Mike Lindell called back – and things got interesting.

The letter doesn’t specifically mention companies’ names. But critics of the bill have called on major firms in Georgia, such as Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines, to speak out after Gov. Brian Kemp signed it. Delta CEO Ed Bastian said Wednesday in a public memo that “the final bill is unacceptable and does not match Delta’s values.”

Democratic officials and civil rights groups have criticized the new law, saying it suppresses voters, particularly those who are Black. President Joe Biden called it a “blatant attack on the Constitution” and likened it to “Jim Crow in the 21st century.”

In an interview with CNN on Wednesday, Chenault said: “What we’re calling on corporations to do is not just say they believe strongly in the right to vote. It’s to publicly and directly oppose any discriminatory legislation and all measures designed to limit any individuals ability to vote.”

The election bill also says volunteers shouldn’t hand out water and snacks to voters waiting in line and there should be no “ballot selfies” taken. Another controversial measure is adopting stricter voter ID laws for absentee ballots.

Apple CEO Tim Cook is the most recent executive to condemn Georgia’s new election law. On Thursday, Cook said: “It ought to be easier than ever for every eligible citizen to exercise their right to vote.”

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Tim Cook condemned Georgia’s new election law, the latest CEO speaking out on voter-suppression concerns

Tim Cook Apple Park speech
Tim Cook gave a speech from the Apple Park in California.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook came out against Georgia’s restrictive new voting law on Thursday.
  • “It ought to be easier than ever for every eligible citizen to exercise their right to vote,” he said.
  • He is the latest CEO to speak out on voter-suppression concerns.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has slammed Georgia’s controversial new election law, joining the ranks of other CEOs who have done the same.

The Republican-backed law, known as SB 202, will reform many aspects of elections and voting in Georgia and critics say that it suppresses the right to vote.

“The right to vote is fundamental in a democracy. American history is the story of expanding the right to vote to all citizens, and Black people, in particular, have had to march, struggle and even give their lives for more than a century to defend that right,” Cook told Axios in a statement published Thursday.

“Apple believes that, thanks in part to the power of technology, it ought to be easier than ever for every eligible citizen to exercise their right to vote,” he added.

“We support efforts to ensure that our democracy’s future is more hopeful and inclusive than its past.”

Other business leaders who have spoken out against the law include Delta CEO Ed Bastian, Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey, and JP Morgan chase CEO Jamie Dimon. Delta and Coca-Cola are both headquartered in Georgia.

Read more: GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger on recognizing the QAnon threat and not fearing a GOP primary challenger for voting to impeach Trump

More than 70 Black executives have signed a letter, calling on companies across the US to publicly denounce the new laws as suppressing voters, particularly the state’s Black voters, the New York Times reported Wednesday.

Civil-rights group and democratic officials have slammed the law, saying it suppresses voters, particularly those who are Black, and have also called on firms in the state to also speak out about it.

President Joe Biden described the new law as “a blatant attack on the Constitution and good conscience,” and likened it to “Jim Crow in the 21st century.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

The ACLU, NAACP, and the Southern Poverty Law Center are suing Georgia over its new voting law

georgia voting
Demonstrators stand outside of the Georgia Capitol building on March 3, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Civil rights groups have filed a lawsuit against Georgia over its new voting law, the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund announced on Tuesday.

The lawsuit was brought against the state by the American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of Georgia, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF), Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), and law firms WilmerHale, and Davis Wright Tremaine.

The new voting law, SB 202, was signed by Gov. Brian Kemp last week.

It brings big changes to several aspects of the election process, and civil rights groups have said it suppresses voters, particularly Georgia’s Black voters.

This is a developing story. Please come back for updates.

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