Late Senator Bob Dole cracks a voter fraud joke at his own funeral service

A military honor guard carries the casket of the late former Senator Robert Dole (R-KS) at the conclusion of his funeral service at Washington National Cathedral on December 10, 2021 in Washington, DC.
A military honor guard carries the casket of the late former Senator Robert Dole (R-KS) at the conclusion of his funeral service at Washington National Cathedral on December 10, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Late former US Senator Bob Dole cracked a voter fraud joke at his own funeral service on Friday.
  • The joke was part of a farewell letter he had written that his daughter read at the service.
  • President Joe Biden also spoke at the service and delivered a tribute to the late senator. 

Late former US Senator Bob Dole cracked a voter fraud joke at his own funeral service on Friday.

The joke was part of a farewell letter Dole wrote before his death that his daughter, Robin Dole, read aloud at his funeral at the Washington National Cathedral.

“I also confess that I’m a bit curious to learn if I’m correct in thinking that Heaven will look a lot like Kansas,” Dole wrote in the letter. “And to see, like others who have gone before me, if I will still be able to vote in Chicago.”

The joke was met with laughs from the audience.

 

President Joe Biden also delivered a tribute to Dole at the late senator’s service. 

“We served together for 25 years. We disagreed, but we were never disagreeable with one another,” Biden said. “I found Bob to be a man of principle, pragmatism and enormous integrity.

Dole died on Sunday at age 98 after battling lung cancer.

The former senator was also a US Army veteran, and he received a Purple Heart for his service in Europe after he was wounded by German fire. 

He was first elected to Congress in 1961 to represent Kansas and ran for president multiple times before losing to Bill Clinton in 1996 as the GOP nominee. 

He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Elizabeth Dole, and his daughter, Robin.

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Trump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani baselessly claims that he has ‘900 death certificates’ on hand to prove that thousands of dead people voted in the election

Rudy Giuliani speaks to reporters
Trump-allied lawyer and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani claims that he has 900 death certificates that prove the conspiracy theory that dead people voted in the 2020 presidential election.

  • Rudy Giuliani made an unsubstantiated claim that he has proof to validate the conspiracy theory that dead people voted in the 2020 election.
  • Giuliani said he possesses 900 death certificates of people who died in 2000 but voted in 2020.
  • However, Giuliani has not produced the evidence or said where he obtained said death certificates.

Trump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani is once again saying that he possesses evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 election, claiming on Thursday night he had “900 death certificates” that prove dead people voted. 

Appearing on “The Lindell Report,” a program usually hosted by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Giuliani told guest host Brannon Howse about the death certificates.

“Let’s look at Georgia for a moment, Raffensperger, the Secretary of State, who until recently, was saying that it was a perfect election,” Giuliani said, referencing Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. “The idiot said to the president, it was a perfect election. He said to the president, you know, we looked and we couldn’t find any dead people who voted.” 

“I found 900 people whose death certificates I had, they all died in 2000, before the election,” Giuliani said. “I think the actual number our expert estimated was more in the range of about four or five or six thousand. But I had 900 death certificates. They’re people who voted!” 

“Don’t tell me it was a perfect election, then I know you’re a damn liar,” Giuliani added. 

During an earlier segment of the broadcast, Giuliani told Howse: “You can’t let 300 dead people vote, much less 6,000!” 

Giuliani did not display the death certificates on-air and did not reveal where he had obtained them. Giuliani did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider.

Other right-wing figures have also floated the conspiracy theory that dead people voted in the 2020 elections. Lindell, for instance, claimed without evidence in October that 23,000 dead people voted using a prison address

During his appearance on “The Lindell Report,” Giuliani also continued to push a variety of unsubstantiated election fraud theories. For one, Giuliani claimed that he had “400 affidavits” from people who witnessed election fraud. He cited the example of an unnamed “very religious woman” in Detroit, who he says told him that she witnessed election fraud. The former mayor of New York City also said, without substantiation, that he saw a video of people “casing the joint” at a vote-counting center in Georgia, likening it to videos he used to see when he used to “prosecute bank robbers.” 

Since the 2020 election, Giuliani has consistently pushed and parroted baseless election fraud claims. This kicked off at a now-infamous press conference in November 2020 outside Four Seasons Total Landscaping in Pennsylvania, where Giuliani told reporters the Trump campaign planned to challenge the election in court while making baseless claims of election fraud. 

Giuliani was suspended from practicing law in New York in June, after a court found that there was “uncontroverted evidence” that he made “demonstrably false and misleading” statements on election fraud.

He has also admitted under oath that he did not verify some of the election fraud claims that he parroted, and got the “evidence” from social media. Separately, Giuliani also told a Dominion Voting Systems lawyer that he “didn’t have the time” to verify voter fraud claims about the 2020 election after he heard about them. 

Dominion is suing Giuliani and others who peddled baseless claims saying that the electronic voting company rigged the 2020 election in favor of President Joe Biden.

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Voting systems company Smartmatic wants MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s lawsuit dismissed, and accuses him of going on a ‘crusade without a claim’ by suing them for suppressing free speech

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell
Voting systems company Smartmatic said MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell was on a “crusade without a claim” in a new filing on Wednesday.

  • Voting systems company Smartmatic has filed for MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s lawsuit against them to be dismissed.
  • Smartmatic argued that Lindell’s claims against them are “fictitious,” calling the pillow CEO’s lawsuit a “stunt.”
  • Lindell sued Smartmatic in June, alleging that they tried to stifle his rights to free speech.

Voting systems company Smartmatic said MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is on a “crusade without a claim” in a new court filing on Wednesday. 

Asking the court to dismiss Lindell’s federal lawsuit against them, Smartmatic argued that Lindell’s claims against them are fictitious, calling the pillow executive’s allegations a “stunt” with “no basis in fact or law.” 

“Presenting fiction as fact outside the courtroom can result in a defamation lawsuit. Presenting fiction as fact inside the courtroom should result in dismissal and sanctions,” wrote Smartmatic in the filing seen by Insider. “The First Amendment allows Mr. Lindell to espouse his fictional views about the 2020 US election outside the courtroom with the understanding that he will face legal consequences for doing so. But the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure do not allow Mr. Lindell and his attorneys to present fictitious claims inside the courtroom.”

Lindell has been engaged in a legal battle with both Smartmatic and Dominion Voting Systems for the better part of the year. In June, Lindell filed a lawsuit saying that he stands to lose more than $2 billion from what he alleged was a “conspiracy and enterprise to harm him” by both companies. In the lawsuit, Lindell outlined a theory that alleged the two companies’ machines enabled voter fraud to happen.

In Wednesday’s filing, Smartmatic’s lawyers went on to note that “no court has ever found a claim based on the ‘facts’ alleged against Smartmatic.” They also argued that Lindell’s five key allegations against their company have no basis.

According to Smartmatic’s filing, some of Lindell’s claims include accusations that Smartmatic was involved in a conspiracy with Dominion Voting Systems and that Smartmatic violated Lindell’s First Amendment rights. 

“These claims are as farcical as they appear. They are all foreclosed by existing law, and Mr. Lindell alleges no facts to satisfy their elements. Each claim also centers on the idea that Mr. Lindell was ‘punished’ for speaking out about the 2020 US election,” wrote Smartmatic’s legal representatives. “But he does not identify a single act by Smartmatic targeting or related to him, much less an act that prevented him from speaking out.” 

Separately, Dominion sued Lindell in February for $1.3 billion. Lindell’s company MyPillow then filed a $1.6 billion lawsuit, accusing Dominion of trying to stifle free speech. The MyPillow CEO also attempted to have the defamation lawsuit dismissed during a hearing in June. This effort failed after US District Judge Carl J. Nichols ruled the three defamation lawsuits against Lindell and the pro-Trump lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani could proceed in full.

Despite the lawsuits, Lindell has continued to float claims that the election was stolen from former President Donald Trump despite there being no evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Most recently, Lindell attempted to file a Supreme Court complaint that he baselessly claims will overturn the election results. However, he failed to file the complaint because it was missing critical components, including the names and signatures of a plaintiff and counsel.

Insider reached Lindell for comment late on Wednesday night. 

“There will be no machines in the USA used in future elections. All the owners will all be in prison!” Lindell said. 

When asked about Smartmatic’s argument that his claims are fictitious, Lindell said: “It is all fact or I wouldn’t be wasting my time!” Lindell also called for people to look at the “all the evidence” in the Supreme Court complaint, a copy of which is available on his website. 

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Michael Cohen says Trump won’t pursue a 2024 White House bid, calls his ‘Big Lie’ fundraising appeals ‘the greatest grift in US history’

Michael Cohen.
Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen.

  • Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that the former president won’t run for president in 2024.
  • “This should become a documentary, and it should be called the greatest grift in US history,” Cohen said of Trump’s efforts.
  • “If he loses, which he will in 2024, what happens to the ‘Big Lie?’ The big lie disappears,” Cohen said.

Former President Donald Trump’s ex-lawyer Michael Cohen on Sunday said that the former president would not run for the White House in 2024.

During an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Cohen, a former Trump confidant-turned-critic, told host Chuck Todd that the ex-president’s efforts to secure political donations as he dangles another campaign in front of his supporters was being done “to keep the grift growing and to keep the grift going.”

“This should become a documentary, and it should be called the greatest grift in US history,” he said. “Donald Trump has made it very clear, right, that he is grifting off of the American people, these supporters, these individuals that are just sending money to him at record levels.”

“It’s really amazing that people don’t see exactly what the guy is doing,” he emphasized.

Cohen goes on to describe what he perceives to be Trump’s calling card.

“I talk about his sociopathy throughout ‘Disloyal,'” he said, referencing his memoir that was released last year. “I talk about it on my podcast, Mea Culpa, ad nauseam.”

He continued: “Please understand … and this is really important for all of the viewers as well. One of the things Donald Trump has done is grift off of the ‘Big Lie’ that the election was stolen from him in 2020. It was not stolen from him.”

Cohen said that Trump is using the specter of a campaign to continue airing his debunked election-related grievances, but contended that if the former president lost a 2024 bid, then his claims wouldn’t stand up.

“If he loses, which he will in 2024, what happens to the ‘Big Lie?’ The big lie disappears. He can’t now be like the boy who cried wolf. ‘Oh, they stole it from me in 2020 — they now stole it from me in 2024.’ Right? Now, that goes out the door and there goes his money,” he said of the former president’s claims.

“There goes the big grift. So like I said before, it’s not going to happen. He’s going to run it like he did in 2011, right to the very, very last second,” he added.

Trump has not yet indicated if he’ll run for the presidency in 2024, but earlier this month, he said that he would “probably” reveal his decision after the 2022 midterm elections.

The former president is playing an usually active role for an ex-president in 2022 Republican primary campaigns, seeking to prop up preferred candidates in Senate races while in some instances pushing other candidates to pursue other elected positions.

In a September interview with Insider’s Sonam Sheth, Cohen said that Trump would continue to soak up his time in the spotlight while continuing to rake in money from devotees of his presidency.

“His insatiable need for attention is one reason he continues to flaunt this disingenuous 2024 run,” he said at the time. “The other is he’s making more money doing that than anything he has ever done before.”

The New York Times reported in July that Trump had raised over $100 million in the first six months of the year, a total that surpassed every other Republican during that time frame.

Cohen, who was once part of the former president’s inner circle, was sentenced to three years in prison in December 2018 after pleading guilty to financial crimes and lying to Congress about a Moscow real estate project.

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Mike Lindell blames the RNC for not being able to file a Supreme Court complaint that he baselessly claims would overturn the election results

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell holding a phone outside the White House
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is accusing the RNC of telling state attorneys general not to sign the complaint he wanted to submit to the Supreme Court. Lindell baselessly claimed that the complaint would overturn the results of the 2020 election.

  • Mike Lindell is blaming the RNC for his failure to file a complaint to the Supreme Court.
  • Lindell’s complaint, which he claimed would overturn the 2020 election, failed to secure a signature from any state.
  • Lindell also attacked RNC Chair Rhona McDaniel for admitting Joe Biden beat Donald Trump. 

My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell is blaming the Republican National Committee for his failure to submit a complete complaint to the Supreme Court. 

Lindell earlier promised his supporters that he would get the lawsuit — which baselessly claims election fraud in the 2020 election — to the court before Thanksgiving. He has not filed the complaint, and instead uploaded a copy of it to his website on Tuesday. However, the complaint appeared to be missing key components, including the names and signatures of a plaintiff and counsel.

“We are in unchartered territory as a Nation. The November 2020 election was stolen,” the complaint reads. It includes over 70 pages of unverified and unsupported allegations about voter fraud in several states, including Arizona, Georgia, and Pennsylvania. 

Lindell has long railed against the results of the 2020 election, despite there being no evidence of widespread voter fraud. He made similar claims about voter fraud when he sat down this month to interview former President Donald Trump for close to 40 minutes at Mar-a-Lago. During the interview, Lindell baselessly identified California, Texas, and Florida as three states where the most votes were “stolen.” 

Lindell, however, is now blaming the RNC too — specifically, its chair, Ronna McDaniel. In a livestream on Monday night, Lindell claimed that McDaniel and the RNC were trying to shut his case down. 

During the livestream, Lindell accused the RNC of calling state attorneys general and pressuring them to not sign his complaint. He also said that he was flying to “five different states” to get attorneys general to sign the document.

Lindell also hit out at McDaniel for her public admission on Thursday that President Joe Biden beat Trump.

“How dare the RNC try and stop this case from getting to the Supreme Court. Shame on you, RNC! You are worse than Fox now!” Lindell said.

The RNC and McDaniel did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. 

Separately, Lindell is facing a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems over claims involving his company. His attempt to have the defamation lawsuit dismissed during a hearing in June failed and the CEO was seen dashing off the stage during an August event as news broke that a US district judge ruled the three defamation lawsuits against Lindell and the pro-Trump lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani could proceed in full.

The pillow executive continues to push claims of voter fraud on his website, Frank Speech. This week, he is hosting a 96-hour marathon livestream called the “Thanks-a-Thon,” which he claimed during his interview with Trump will “help save our country.” 

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Trump said Mike Lindell’s idea to melt down Dominion voting machines and turn them into prison bars was ‘very good’ during a rollicking 40-minute interview about election fraud conspiracy theories

mypillow ceo mike lindell donald trump pillow
My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell sat down with former president Donald Trump for an interview, during which both men pushed baseless voter-fraud claims.

  • My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell’s idea to melt down Dominion voting machines and turn them into prison bars has gotten the Donald Trump stamp of approval.
  • Trump said Lindell’s idea was “very good” and “interesting” during a sit-down interview that aired Tuesday night. 
  • Lindell interviewed Trump at Mar-a-Lago for close to 40 minutes, during which both men pushed baseless voter-fraud claims.

During a pre-recorded sit-down interview with My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell, former President Donald Trump said that Lindell’s idea to melt down Dominion voting machines and turn them into prison bars was “very good.” 

Lindell interviewed Trump for close to 40 minutes at the former president’s Mar-a-Lago residence in Florida. During the interview, which aired on the Right Side Broadcasting Network Tuesday night, Trump and Lindell spoke at length about the 2020 presidential election and promoted various baseless election conspiracy theories. 

“I wanna say, back to the election in 2020, I wanna thank you, and everyone does,  for standing firm on that,” Lindell said. “You’ve given strength to millions of people.” 

Lindell then floated the idea to Trump that Dominion voting machines could be melted down and made into “prison bars.” 

“That’s very interesting. That’s a very good idea,” Trump said.

During the interview, Lindell also said he was looking into the voter rolls in the “red states,” saying he wanted to look inside their machines and “right into their routers.” Trump told Lindell he was looking at the vote count in Texas as well. 

“Even though I won Texas by a lot, they should really look into it,” Trump told Lindell. “They should really get to it. Because you’re going to lose elections in those states eventually, you’re going to lose Texas at some point.” 

The former president won Texas by five percentage points.

Lindell then alleged that the top three states where votes were stolen were “California number one, Texas number two, and Florida number three.” 

Donald Trump won Florida, defeating President Joe Biden by about three percentage points. However, efforts local Florida Republicans are pushing for a “forensic audit” and a recount of the 11.1 million votes cast in the state. However, Gov. Ron DeSantis said last year that Florida was a model for how states should handle ballots.

For his part, Lindell has promoted the baseless claim that Trump won Florida by about three times as many votes. 

Lindell is currently embroiled in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit with Dominion Voting Systems. Lindell attempted to have the defamation lawsuit dismissed during a hearing in June. This effort failed, and the CEO was seen dashing off-stage during his August cyber symposium as news broke that US District Judge Carl J. Nichols ruled the three defamation lawsuits against Lindell and the pro-Trump lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani could proceed in full.

More than a year later, Trump continues to claim the election was stolen from him, despite there being no evidence of widespread voter fraud. The former president last month called for a vote audit in Pima County, the second-largest county in Arizona, even after the first recount in Maricopa County proved that President Joe Biden won — and by 261 more votes than was initially counted.

In the meantime, Lindell announced during his interview with Trump that he will be holding a 96-hour marathon livestream over Thanksgiving to “help save our country.” 

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‘She’s lost it’: Fox News host Maria Bartiromo and AG Bill Barr got into a shouting match about the 2020 election, book says

Collage: Former Attorney General Bill Barr and Fox News host Maria Bartiromo.
Former Attorney General Bill Barr and Fox News host Maria Bartiromo.

  • Longtime Fox News host Maria Bartiromo denies having gotten into a shouting match with Trump’s AG.
  • Speaking on the record for Jonathan Karl’s forthcoming book, former AG Bill Barr said Bartiromo “called me up and she was screaming.”
  • “She’s lost it,” Barr recalled of the incident, which Bartiromo denied via a spokesperson.

In the wake of the 2020 election, then-Attorney General Bill Barr said longtime Fox News host Maria Bartiromo called him to complain that the Justice Department was not doing enough to investigate President Donald Trump’s demonstrably false voter-fraud claims, according to a new book by ABC News correspondent Jonathan Karl.

“She called me up and she was screaming,” Barr said of Bartiromo to the author. “I yelled back at her. She’s lost it.”

The conversation is reported in Karl’s forthcoming book, “Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show,” which comes out on Tuesday. Insider obtained an early copy of the book. 

Bartiromo, who did not speak on the record for Karl’s book, denied Barr’s account in a statement to Insider.

“Maria Bartiromo denied these allegations noting it was Barr who was aggressive with her, yelling and cursing during the call,” Bartiromo’s spokesperson said in an email, similar to the statement given by Fox News to Karl for the book.

During the aftermath of the 2020 election, Bartiromo was an outlier in both her Fox News and Fox Business Network shows, amplifying baseless voter fraud claims and featuring guests such as former Trump attorney Sidney Powell, who sought to challenge the election results. Election officials have repeatedly shut down conspiracy theories of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election as false. 

Despite promising major revelations, Powell’s election fraud claims have been thoroughly debunked and she’s facing a $4 billion defamation lawsuit from election-tech firms. Fox News has been seeking to dismiss a similar lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems.

Fox News projected Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 election on November 7 last year. Days earlier, Trump had reportedly been furious with the network when it declared Biden won Arizona, a key swing state that Trump won in 2016. Trump continues to push falsehoods that he won the election. 

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A GOP gubernatorial candidate complained about mail-in voting after his daughter’s ballot arrived late. Officials say she applied to vote in the wrong county.

In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, U.S. Attorney William McSwain speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.
In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, U.S. Attorney William McSwain speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.

  • Bill McSwain tweeted that his daughter’s mail-in ballot arrived two days after Election Day.
  • Election official Lisa Deeley told McSwain that his daughter registered to vote in the wrong county.
  • Because of US Postal Service funding cuts, election officials urged voters to request ballots early.

Pennsylvania GOP gubernatorial candidate Bill McSwain tweeted that the state’s voting system is broken after his daughter’s mail-in ballot arrived after Election Day. A state election official responded that his daughter attempted to register as a voter in the wrong county.

“My daughter ordered a mail-in ballot 3 weeks ago and it arrived yesterday – 2 days AFTER Election Day, what a joke! We need to fix this broken system so that everyone can make their voice heard and every legal vote is counted,” McSwain tweeted.

Lisa Deeley, chair of the Philadelphia City Commissioners, responded that McSwain’s daughter applied to vote on October 17 in a county that did not correspond with her address. The commissioners are in charge of elections and voter registration for the city of Philadelphia, according to the board’s website.

“Your daughter applied to the wrong county on 10/17, it was transferred to us on 10/20 we mailed it to the requested address in West Chester the next day. This issue is the results of the disastrous cuts to the @USPS which underscores the need to accept ballots postmarked by [Election Day],” Deeley tweeted.

As cuts were made to the US Postal Service during the pandemic, Americans began experiencing service disruptions, prompting many to worry about timely delivery of ballots during elections. Officials throughout the country have urged voters to request their ballots as soon as possible, with some states expanding mail-in voting and the amount of time allotted for in-person voting to counteract delivery uncertainty.

Insider has reached out to McSwain and Deeley for comment.

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Trump and Republicans haven’t made a peep about voter fraud in Virginia since Glenn Youngkin won

Glenn Youngkin
Virginia Republican gubernatorial nominee Glenn Youngkin speaks with members of the press alongside his wife Suzanne, left, after voting early in Fairfax, Va., on September 23, 2021.

  • Trump and Republicans repeatedly cried voter fraud before the Virginia gubernatorial election.
  • They haven’t said a word about fraud since the GOP candidate, Glenn Youngkin, won on Tuesday.
  • In fact, Trump claimed credit for Youngkin’s victory, saying “MAGA voters” delivered the win.

On Monday, former President Donald Trump announced he was “not a believer in the integrity of Virginia’s elections.”

The next day, he took credit for Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin’s win in the state.

Following Trump’s lead, other Republican electeds and pundits also abandoned their claims that Democrats would steal the election immediately after Youngkin became the first Republican to win a Virginia gubernatorial election in over a decade.

The conservative talk radio host John Fredericks warned of rampant voter fraud in an October 27 broadcast, saying, “Everything’s moving in Youngkin’s direction and the Republicans, but a lot of people fear that this is going to get stolen, they’re going to try and cheat. We’ve got all kinds of irregularities right now going on.”

Mother Jones also reported that John Mills, a former cybersecurity official at the Pentagon who is now a conservative commentator for the far-right Epoch Times, falsely caimed that ballot-counting facilities have poor security and that “people can walk in and out.”

Republican state Senator Amanda Chase, a Youngkin surrogate who has long claimed the 2020 election was rigged, baselessly claimed in a late October interview that “Democrats are cheating” in the early vote and that she had passed along information to the Youngkin campaign about how Democrats “are stealing elections in Virginia.”

Youngkin said he knew nothing about these claims and that the election would be fair. On Tuesday night, Chase congratulated Youngkin on his win. She never released any of the purported evidence she said she has of voter fraud.

Youngkin walked a fine line on the issue during his campaign. While he was careful to avoid openly embracing the GOP’s false claims about the 2020 election, he also refused to reject these conspiracy theories in the early months of his campaign.

Before he secured the GOP nomination in May, Youngkin wouldn’t say that Joe Biden legitimately won the 2020 presidential election and pushed for a “commission on election integrity.” In recent months, he conceded that “there wasn’t material fraud” in the 2020 election, which he called “certifiably fair.”

Youngkin also acknowledged under questioning that recent elections in Virginia have been safe and fair, but he spoke at an “election integrity” rally in Lynchburg in August that featured speakers who’ve spread false and misleading claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election.

He also tried flipping the script on his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, by saying Democrats questioned the results of the 2000 presidential election and Georgia’s 2018 gubernatorial election. McAuliffe hit back at Youngkin, saying there’s no comparison between disputes over the 2000 election and the 2020 election because of the Supreme Court’s involvement in deciding the winner of the former.

Virginia officials have for months attempted to assuage concerns about the security of the state’s elections. The state’s Department of Elections set up a website called “Democracy Defended” that laid out all the ways in which the state keeps its elections safe. At the same time, Youngkin and other Republicans urged their supporters to volunteer as poll watchers and the state saw a surge in election observers this year.

Trump and many of his allies have continued to aggressively promote their false claims that the 2020 election was “rigged” and “stolen” by Democrats. There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election and Republicans’ claims that fraud swung the election are false. In fact, nonpartisan election and cybersecurity experts concluded that the 2020 election was the safest and most secure in US history.

But many Republican voters are convinced otherwise. A large majority of Republican voters still believe President Joe Biden didn’t win and the 2020 election was rigged, according to several recent polls. Just a third of GOP voters said they trust US elections either a great deal or a good amount, according to a recent NPR/PBS/Marist poll. In an October NBC poll, just 41% of Republicans said they think their vote will be counted fairly — down from 84% in October 2020.

Trump, for his part, credited himself and “MAGA voters” for delivering Youngkin a victory in Virginia, despite repeatedly suggesting that the election would be marred by fraud and abuse.

“It is looking like Terry McAuliffe’s campaign against a certain person named ‘Trump’ has very much helped Glenn Youngkin,” the former president said in an email Tuesday night. “All McAuliffe did was talk Trump, Trump, Trump and he lost!”

As of Wednesday morning, with an estimated 99% of the vote reporting, Youngkin carried 51% of the vote, a nearly seven-point improvement over Trump’s vote share in 2020. McAuliffe won 49% of the vote, underperforming Biden’s share by five points.

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A Nevada man said a ballot cast in his dead wife’s name ‘lent some credence’ to voter fraud claims. Now officials say he’s the one who did it.

Absentee voting material typically sent to voters for elections
  • Donald Kirk Hartle of Las Vegas was charged with two counts of voter fraud in the 2020 election.
  • Hartle voted twice, including with the mail-in ballot issued to his dead wife, officials said.
  • Hartle previously said the ballot cast in his wife’s name gave credibility to voter fraud claims.

Donald Kirk Hartle of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been charged with two counts of voter fraud related to the 2020 general election, the office of Nevada Attorney General Aaron D. Ford announced Thursday.

After already voting himself, Hartle, 55, used his dead wife’s name on a second mail-in ballot in order to vote twice, according to the criminal complaint.

Rosemarie Hartle, his wife, died from breast cancer in 2017, according to Hartle.

When an investigation was first launched into who cast his wife’s ballot, Hartle told KLAS that the incident was “pretty sickening” and “lent some credence to what you’ve been hearing in the media” regarding voter fraud. He also said it made him “wonder how pervasive” voter fraud is.

The Nevada GOP also tweeted about the incident, citing it has a “concrete case” of voter fraud.

In a statement to the Associated Press on Thursday, Hartle’s attorney, David Chesnoff, said: “Mr. Hartle looks forward to responding to the allegations.”

An investigation by KLAS found that Rosemarie’s name remained on an active voters list following her death. She was issued a ballot in 2020 due to a new state law that required all counties to send every registered voter a mail-in ballot.

The completed ballot was then received by the county with a signature that matched their records, despite Hartle’s claim that the ballot was never delivered to their house, officials told KLAS.

“Voter fraud is rare, but when it happens it undercuts trust in our election system and will not be tolerated by my office,” Ford said in a press release. “I want to stress that our office will pursue any credible allegations of voter fraud and will work to bring any offenders to justice.”

Both of Hartle’s charges, voting using the name of another person and voting more than once in the same election, are punishable by prison terms of up to four years, as well as a fine of up to $5,000, according to the Nevada attorney general’s office. His initial court appearance is set for November 18.

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