One Egyptian company is keeping the 5,000-year-old art of papyrus-making alive –¬†here’s what it’s like inside

  • We visited an Egyptian business that’s one of the last places in the world to make papyrus paper.
  • Ancient Egyptians invented papyrus paper around 5,000 years ago, but the art is almost completely lost today.
  • One village is keeping the ancient tradition alive, though the pandemic is hurting business.
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This Japanese snack shop has been serving roasted rice cakes to Shinto worshippers for over 1,000 years

  • Ichimonjiya Wasuke, known as Ichiwa, was founded in the year 1001 to serve the Shinto priests at the adjacent Imamiya Shrine in Kyoto, Japan.
  • The only item on the menu is aburi-mochi, roasted rice cakes on skewers that are dipped in sweet miso sauce.
  • Worshippers pray for good health at the shrine and then eat the aburi-mochi as an unofficial part of the ritual.
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How animal hides are made into parchment at the last workshop of its kind in the US

  • Pergamena is the last company in the US that uses animal skins to make parchment.
  • The craft dates back to 2500 BC and was most popular during the Middle Ages, before paper was industrialized.
  • CEO Jesse Meyer taught himself the craft as a way to revitalize his family’s nearly 500-year-old tannery business.
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