Biden told staff not to serve leafy greens because he didn’t want to be photographed with leaves in his teeth, report says

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U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the COVID-19 response and the ongoing vaccination program at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on May 12, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Häagen-Daz ice cream, Special K cereal, and a plethora of fruit and vegetables were always on hand when President Joe Biden lived in the vice president’s residence from 2009 to 2017, according to The New York Times.

But the one food item you wouldn’t see at an official event? Leafy greens.

In a new report detailing the Democratic president’s first few months settling into the White House, The Times reported Biden put the kibosh on leafy greens at public events for a precautionary and relatable reason: He didn’t want to be photographed with leaves in his teeth.

The White House Press Office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Christopher Freeman, a caterer who worked for the Bidens weekly during the now-president’s tenure as second-in-command also told the outlet while Biden “eschews alcohol,” his wife, Jill Biden, was “an oenophile of the first degree.”

Among the foodstuffs staff were told to keep stocked in the vice-presidential kitchen were: one bunch of red grapes, sliced cheese, six eggs, sliced bread, one tomato from the garden, and at least two apples at all times.

Since taking office in January, Biden’s eating routine has been heavily dictated by the pandemic, which has reportedly forced him to take his 30-minute lunch each day alone, except for his weekly lunch appointment with Vice President Kamala Harris.

But despite full days of policy and politicking, Biden is usually back in the White House residential wing by 7 p.m. each night to eat dinner with First Lady Jill Biden. According to The Times, Biden opts for pasta with red sauce, while Jill likes grilled chicken or fish.

Among the other food facts in The Times piece was the revelation of Biden’s preferred drink – Orange Gatorade – which set off a smattering of takes on Twitter.

The Times piece also touches on the president’s innermost circle of trusted allies and his careful and cautious decision-making process.

Aides told the newspaper the president has a “short fuse,” and bouts of impatience, but never erupts in rage like his predecessor, the former President Donald Trump. Though Biden may be quick to end conversations he finds frustrating, sources also told The Times he frequently displays bouts of “unexpected warmth.

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Walter Mondale made history by choosing Geraldine Ferraro as first female running mate on a major party ticket

Walter Mondale/ Geraldine Ferraro
On Wednesday, Sept. 5, 1984, Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale and his running mate, Geraldine Ferraro, wave as they leave an afternoon rally in Portland, Ore.

  • Former Vice President Walter Mondale died Monday at the age of 93.
  • Mondale served as Jimmy Carter’s vice president before running for president himself in 1984.
  • During his campaign, Mondale made history by selecting Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former Vice President Walter Mondale, who died Monday at the age of 93, made history during his 1984 presidential run when he chose Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as his running mate.

Though then President Ronald Reagan handily defeated Mondale and Ferraro, the Minnesota politician was a pioneer as the first presidential candidate on a major party ticket to choose a female running mate – nearly four decades before Vice President Kamala Harris became the first woman sworn into the office.

“Our founders said in the Constitution, ‘We the people’ – not just the rich, or men, or white, but all of us,” Mondale said after he announced the three-term congresswoman as his running mate, according to Politico.

Mondale had reportedly sought to make history with his choice, the outlet reported, considering African American lawmakers and a Hispanic lawmaker among other candidates.

“The Ferraro pick represented the intersection of principle and politics,” Joel K. Goldstein, vice-presidential historian, professor of law emeritus at St. Louis University said in his book “The White House Vice Presidency: The Path to Significance, Mondale to Biden.”

“Walter Mondale’s public service was dedicated to opening doors for disadvantaged groups and he constructed his VP selection process consistent with that commitment.”

In addition to her gender, Ferraro’s ethnicity made history as well. She was the first Italian-American nominee on a major party ticket.

Mondale’s pick was initially met with enthusiasm and praise, giving the ticket a bump in the polls, but questions about Ferraro and her husband’s finances became a liability as the campaign went on.

In November, Mondale and Ferraro lost in a landslide, receiving only 41% of the popular vote and losing every state in the Electoral College except the District of Columbia and Mondale’s home state of Minnesota. The ticket also lost Ferraro’s district in New York.

Reflecting on his decision in his 2010 book, “The Good Fight,” Mondale said he thought Ferraro would be “an excellent vice president and could be a good president. …I also knew that I was far behind Reagan and that if I just ran a traditional campaign, I would never get in the game.”

In the book, Mondale also said his wife of nearly 60 years, Joan, had encouraged him to choose a female running mate.

“Joan thought we were far enough along in the movement for women’s rights that the political system had produced plenty of qualified candidates, and she thought voters were ready for a ticket that would break the white-male mold.”

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Joe Biden said in 2015 he learned how to be a good vice president from Walter Mondale

Walter Mondale Joe Biden
Pictured on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015, Vice President Joe Biden talks with former Vice President Walter Mondale as they participate in a forum honoring Mondale’s legacy, at George Washington University in Washington. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday, April 19, 2021. He was 93.

  • Then-Vice President Joe Biden honored former VP Walter “Fritz” Mondale at an event in 2015.
  • Mondale, who served as vice president to former President Jimmy Carter, died Monday at 93.
  • Biden said to Carter at the 2015 event that he and Mondale displayed the model relationship between a president and VP.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Joe Biden, then vice president, said in 2015 he took the “roadmap” of the vice presidency from former Vice President Walter “Fritz” Mondale.

Mondale, who served under former President Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1981, died Monday at 93.

At a 2015 event hosted by the University of Minnesota honoring Mondale, a Minnesota native, Biden said he “took Fritz’s roadmap.”

“He actually gave me a memo, classic Fritz, gave me a memo, as to what I should be looking for and what kind of commitments I should get to be able to do the job the way Fritz thought it should be done,” Biden said at the 2015 event.

During the 2015 tribute to Mondale, Biden thanked Mondale and Carter, who were both in attendance, for being the model relationship between a president and a vice president – and the confidence the former should have in the latter.

Walter Mondale Jimmy Carter and families
Inauguration Day on Jan. 21, 1977, President Jimmy Carter, right, and Rosalynn Carter, second from right, pose with Vice President Walter Mondale and wife, Joan Mondale, left, following Carter’s inauguration in the White House Blue Room in Washington. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday, April 19, 2021. He was 93.

“You’re saying to your staff and others that ‘Fritz Mondale speaks for me, he has my confidence’ makes an enormous amount of difference, and it amazes me how some presidents of the past haven’t understood that,” Biden said to Carter at the time.

“John Kerry is a great secretary of state, Hillary Clinton is a great secretary of state, but there are times when only the vice president – if it’s known of his relationship with the president – can speak for the United States when the president can’t be there, because no one ever doubted when Fritz spoke for you,” Biden continued.

He added that then-President Obama had “empowered” Biden “the same way because he saw how it worked for you.”

Mondale, who was the Democratic presidential nominee in 1984, made the historic nomination of New York Rep. Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate, making her the first female nominee for vice president of a major US political party.

In 2020, Vice President Kamala Harris, alongside President Biden, made history as the first woman to become vice president.

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Kamala Harris, the first female, Black, and Asian American vice president-elect, will be sworn in by Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina Supreme Court justice

kamala harris
Harris is the first female, Black, and Asian American vice president-elect in United States history.

  • In a historic ceremony, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in on Wednesday by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
  • Harris is the first female, Black, and Asian American vice president-elect in United States history. Sotomayor is the first Latina justice to sit on the Supreme Court.
  • When asked about being sworn in outside the US Capitol following the deadly siege on the building, Harris said “we cannot yield those who would try and make us afraid of who we are.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In a historic ceremony, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in on Wednesday by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, ABC News first reported.

Harris is the first female, Black, and Asian American vice president-elect in United States history. Sotomayor is the first Latina justice to sit on the Supreme Court.

Harris, who is also Indian American, made history when she and President-elect Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election in the fall. Civil-rights advocates celebrated her win, saying it would positively affect policy in the Biden administration and inspire young Americans of different backgrounds.

“Bringing Black and South Asian representation to the table, her lived experiences as a woman of color and a daughter of immigrants will offer a point of view in the White House the likes of which this country has never seen,” Christian Nunes, the president of the National Organization for Women, told Insider’s Eliza Relman at the time.

Read more: Kamala Harris is staffing up with veteran Washington insiders in advance of being sworn in as the country’s first woman vice president. Meet her first White House hires.

A source told ABC the vice president-elect is inspired by Sotomayor. In 2019, Harris praised Sotomayor in a tweet sent during Hispanic Heritage month.

“Judge Sonia Sotomayor has fought for the voices of the people ever since her first case voting against corporations in Citizens United. As a critical voice on the bench, she’s showing all our children what’s possible,” Harris said.

Sotomayor joined the Supreme Court in 2009 after being nominated by former President Barack Obama, who also made history as the country’s first Black president. Sotomayor is the first woman of color and first Hispanic person to sit on the bench.

The swearing in ceremony for Harris is set for Inauguration Day, January 20, when Biden will also be sworn in as America’s 46th president.

Following the violent attack on the US Capitol on January 6, security efforts have been heightened for the inauguration.

On Saturday, when asked about being sworn in outside the Capitol, Harris said “we cannot yield those who would try and make us afraid of who we are.”

And in another historic first, Harris’s husband, Doug Emhoff, will become the nation’s first second gentleman.

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