How UPS drivers are trained to deliver 21 million packages a day

  • UPS spends $200 million a year on safety training for its drivers.
  • We went inside the UPS driving school in West Boylston, Massachusetts, to see how drivers learn to walk on ice, handle aggressive dogs, and drive safely.
  • UPS drivers collectively drive more than 3.5 billion miles a year, with each worker averaging 100 to 150 delivery stops per day.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This video was originally published in December 2020.

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Yes, Amazon delivers on Sunday – but not everywhere

amazon boxes packages delivery
If you live in the right location, Amazon will deliver to you on Sundays.

  • Yes, Amazon does make deliveries on Sunday – but not everywhere in the United States.
  • If Amazon delivers on Sunday in your area, you’ll likely see it as a shipping option when you order something.
  • You can also contact UPS or USPS directly for more information, since they handle Amazon’s Sunday deliveries.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Amazon has become one of the biggest companies in the world by offering quick shipping nearly everywhere in the country. And in most places, “quick” even means delivering on Sundays.

Yes, Amazon delivers on Sunday

Unlike traditional mail, Amazon makes package deliveries every day of the week, Sunday included. These Sunday deliveries are available to all customers where the service is available, regardless of Amazon Prime membership.

If you choose to have your package delivered to an Amazon Locker, there’s a chance that it’ll be delivered there on Sunday too.

Amazon does this by partnering with UPS and the United States Postal Service. UPS and USPS both receive packages from Amazon, and then make the “last mile” delivery to your doorstep. But don’t expect them to deliver any other kinds of packages – Amazon is the only company that they deliver on Sunday for (aside from the occasional USPS Priority mail).

UPS driver
Amazon outsources many of its deliveries to companies like UPS and USPS.

However, there are some restrictions.

Sunday deliveries aren’t available in all areas

UPS and USPS only launched Sunday delivery a few years ago, and it still isn’t available everywhere in the United States. This means that if you live in certain areas – especially more rural areas – Sunday delivery won’t be an option for you.

Amazon doesn’t keep a public list of areas with Sunday delivery; when asked for comment, an Amazon spokesperson simply said it’s available in areas where their “delivery partner and carrier network supports Sunday delivery service.”

Amazon delivery
As time goes on, more cities will support Sunday deliveries.

If you go to checkout with an order and then see “Sunday” as an option under Review items and shipping, it’s definitely available in your area.

But the surefire way to find out if you’re living in the right area for Sunday deliveries is to call UPS and USPS directly. If you connect to a representative and give them your address, they should be able to tell you if your address is eligible for Sunday deliveries.

The best ways to contact Amazon for help when you have a problem with your accountHow to report a missing package on Amazon with the online retailer or a third-party sellerHow to easily reorder items you’ve bought on Amazon in 2 waysHow to change your Amazon account password or reset it if you’ve forgotten it

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The FBI is investigating Postmaster General Louis DeJoy over possible campaign finance violations, report says

Louis DeJoy
United States Postal Service Postmaster General Louis DeJoy speaks during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, in Washington

  • The FBI is investigating Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, the Washington Post reports.
  • The probe concerns possible campaign finance violations at his previous company.
  • DeJoy was previously an executive at New Breed Logistics before joining the USPS.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is probing Postmaster General Louis DeJoy as part of an investigation into potential campaign finance violations committed by leaders of his former company, The Washington Post reported on Thursday.

DeJoy, a prominent GOP donor and logistics executive, was the chief executive of North Carolina-based New Breed Logistics before being selected as postmaster general in mid-2020, joining the beleaguered agency at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The House Oversight Committee had already been investigating allegations that DeJoy and other executives encouraged and gave bonuses to employees who donated money to Republican political candidates during DeJoy’s tenure at New Breed.

Read more: Pelosi and Trump used a fraudulent trick to raise money – and a guy faces 20 years in prison partly for doing the same thing

At congressional hearings in 2020, DeJoy repeatedly denied any wrongdoing in connection with campaign contributions made by him or other New Breed employers. A representative for DeJoy confirmed the FBI probe, which has included interviews with multiple current and former New Breed employees and a subpoena to DeJoy, according to the Post.

“Mr. DeJoy has learned that the Department of Justice is investigating campaign contributions made by employees who worked for him when he was in the private sector,” DeJoy spokesman Mark Corallo told the Post about the FBI investigation. “He has always been scrupulous in his adherence to the campaign contribution laws and has never knowingly violated them.”

A Post investigation published in September 2020 detailed claims from former New Breed employees that DeJoy and other top executives pushed employees to donate money to Republican candidates, then covered the cost of those donations in the employees’ bonuses.

Such activity could run afoul of federal laws banning so-called pass-through or straw donations, in which one person makes donations on behalf of another. Straw donations enable donors to sidestep legal limits on individual campaign contributions.

“Louis was a national fundraiser for the Republican Party. He asked employees for money. We gave him the money, and then he reciprocated by giving us big bonuses,” David Young, a director of human resources for DeJoy for 20 years, told the Post. “When we got our bonuses, let’s just say they were bigger, they exceeded expectations – and that covered the tax and everything else.”

An analysis of federal and state campaign finance records by the Post for their investigation found a pattern of multiple New Breed employees donating the same amounts to the same political candidates on the same days. Over the course of a 14-year period, the Post found, employees of the company collectively gave $1 million to Republican candidates but just $700 to Democrats.

Since his appointment, congressional Democrats have heavily scrutinized DeJoy and repeatedly called for the US Postal Service Board of Governors to fire him, both over his ties to Trump and the GOP and cost-cutting measures DeJoy imposed, which Democrats cast as an effort to hobble the agency ahead of the November 2020 presidential election.

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Amazon exec Dave Clark pushed USPS to install mailbox now at center of union election controversy

Mailbox Amazon Bessemer
The mailbox outside the Amazon warehouse in Bessemer.

Amazon consumer CEO Dave Clark led the company’s push to persuade the US Postal Service to install a controversial temporary mailbox outside Amazon’s warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, during a recent union election, multiple outlets reported Monday.

“Please let me know where we stand on this — this is a highly visible Dave Clark initiative,” Becky Moore, an Amazon senior manager, said in a January email to USPS officials presented at a National Labor Relations Board hearing Monday, according to Bloomberg.

Amazon did not respond to a request for comment on this story.

Jay Smith, a USPS official in charge of managing major accounts including Amazon, also testified to the NLRB that it was the first time he was aware of the agency installing such a mailbox at the request of a private company, Bloomberg reported.

Photos of the mailbox showed that modifications made by the USPS to accommodate more outgoing ballots could potentially have allowed a recipient assigned to an adjacent incoming mailbox to access the outgoing mail, according to Bloomberg.

Last week, Amazon employee Kevin Jackson testified that he saw the company’s security guards use keys to access that outgoing mail slot, but Amazon denied those allegations, Bloomberg previously reported.

Amazon’s employees voted against unionizing in April. But the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, under which employees would have unionized, filed official objections to the NLRB, claiming Amazon violated labor laws during its anti-union campaign.

The NLRB agreed to hold a hearing to determine whether Amazon acted illegally and whether a new election should be held.

The RWDSU specifically objected to Amazon’s push to convince the USPS to install the mailbox – which came despite the NLRB rejecting Amazon’s requests to force employees to vote in-person – saying the mailbox “provided a clear ability to intimidate workers.”

Amazon previously told Insider the box was an effort to allow workers to vote more easily.

The Washington Post reported last month that the USPS only decided to install the mailbox after repeated requests from Amazon corporate employees, but testimony and evidence presented during the multi-day NLRB hearing has shed more light on Amazon’s tactics.

Smith also testified that the USPS explicitly told Amazon not to place anything around the mailbox that suggested it was where employees needed to vote, CNBC reported. Yet Amazon proceeded to place a tent around the mailbox that read: “Speak for yourself! Mail your ballot here.”

“I was surprised because I was asked, ‘Can anything physical be put on the box?'” Smith said, according to CNBC, adding: “I said no. I did not want to see anything else put around that box indicating that it was a vote.”

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More than 50 House Democrats have signed a letter supporting $8 billion to replace USPS trucks with electric vehicles: report

New USPS mail truck
Without a bailout from Congress, the USPS plans to replace many of its aging mail trucks with new gas-powered ones.

  • Support for a plan to provide $8 billion to the USPS to electrify its fleet is growing among Democrats.
  • Without the taxpayer dollars, USPS will replace its aging fleet with new gas vehicles.
  • According to The Washington Post, 50 House Democrats have signed a draft letter supporting the plan.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More than 50 House Democrats have signed onto a draft letter in support of an $8 billion bailout for the USPS that would allow it to buy new electric delivery vehicles, according to The Washington Post.

“To ensure that any federal funding appropriated to the Postal Service for fleet acquisition is used appropriately, we would also include a requirement in legislation that at least 75% of the Postal Service’s new fleet must be electric or zero-emission,” says the draft letter, which was obtained by the Post. “Further, we would require the Postal Service to acquire only electric or zero-emission vehicles after 2040.”

House Democrats plan to send the letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Joe Biden, The Post reported.

Read more: There’s a simple way Congress can make birth control easier to access and improve women’s health

Without a bailout from Congress, the USPS plans to replace many of its aging mail trucks with new gas-powered ones, which would pose a blow to President Joe Biden’s sustainability goals of cutting fossil fuel emissions.

Biden in a January executive order called on federal agencies to transition their vehicles to electric, though the USPS in February announced it had awarded a contract for new vehicles that included both gas-powered engines and electric vehicles, Utility Dive reported in February.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy told Congress in March that it would be “unfeasible” to replace its aging trucks with electric vehicles without billions in aid from Congress. With the funds, DeJoy said the majority of USPS vehicles could be electric within the next decade, Reuters reported.

As The Post noted, such a plan could create a rare coalition between Democrats and DeJoy who have been at odds with each other over issues that include USPS service delays and its handling of the lead up to the 2020 election.

Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, a Democrat from New York who leads the House Committee on Oversight and reform, and Rep. Peter A. DeFazio, a Democrat from Oregon who leads the House Committee on transportation have put their support behind the $8 billion plan, according to the Post’s report.

“The Postal Service has one of the largest vehicle fleets in the world, but far too many postal vehicles are outdated, guzzle gas, and pose a risk to the dedicated Postal Service employees who use them to serve the public every day,” Maloney said in a statement, according to the report.

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The Postal Service is reportedly monitoring Americans’ social media for ‘inflammatory’ content, per report

USPS mailer
The Colorado Secretary of State on Friday said the postal service is confusing voters by mailing out a nationwide postcard encouraging Americans to plan ahead.

An unlikely government entity may be watching your activity on social media.

According to a Yahoo News report, the law-enforcement arm of the US Postal Service is running a “covert” program that monitors Americans’ social media posts for “inflammatory” content and then passes those posts along to other government agencies.

The surveillance effort, which falls under the agency’s Postal Inspection Service, is known as the Internet Covert Operations Program, or iCop, the outlet reported.

Prior to the Yahoo News Wednesday report, details of the program had not been made public.

The outlet obtained a March 16 memo, marked as “law enforcement sensitive” that said analysts with the US Postal Inspection Service had monitored “significant activity regarding planned protests occurring internationally and domestically on March 20, 2021.”

The government bulletin appears to be referencing demonstrations across the world planned as part of a World Wide Rally for Freedom and Democracy, in which groups were expected to demonstrate for a variety of causes, including lockdown measures and 5G, Yahoo News reported.

The two-page document reportedly includes screenshots of users’ posts from Facebook, Parler, and Telegram, including “inflammatory material” which “suggests potential violence may occur.” The memo, however, notes no intelligence exists to suggest specific threats, Yahoo News reported.

One particular Parler screenshot reportedly included in the document shows two users discussing the rallies as an opportunity to “do serious damage” and engage in a “fight.”

An alleged member of the Proud Boys as well as several other users whose identifying details were included are mentioned by name in the memo, according to the outlet.

iCop analysts would continue to monitor the social media accounts “for any potential threats stemming from the scheduled protests” and “will disseminate intelligence updates as needed,” the bulletin reportedly said.

In a statement provided to Yahoo, the Post Office said the US Postal Inspection Service, as the primary law enforcement crime prevention entity of the agency, employs federal officers who protect the agency and its employees, infrastructure, and customers and “enforce the laws that defend the nation’s mail system from illegal or dangerous use” to ensure public trust.

“The Internet Covert Operations Program is a function within the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, which assesses threats to Postal Service employees and its infrastructure by monitoring publicly available open source information,” the statement reportedly said.

The agency also told Yahoo News the Inspection Service collaborates with law-enforcement agencies to identify and assess threats to the Postal Service and its “overall mail processing and transportation network.”

USPS declined to answer the outlet’s specific program-related questions. The agency did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

The Postal Service came under intense scrutiny in 2020, when the Trump-appointed Postmaster General Louis DeJoy made a number of changes in response to financial woes, including cutting overtime and limiting hours. The agency’s operational changes caused outrage ahead of the 2020 general election, when USPS warned some ballots might not be delivered in time for the pandemic-struck election in which millions of people planned to vote by mail.

Debate over the government’s purview to monitor Americans’ social media has heated up following the January 6 Capitol insurrection.

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Postal Service finds ‘no evidence’ of Project Veritas’ claim that mail workers tampered with ballots in the 2020 election

james o keefe project veritas cpac
James O’Keefe, President of Project Veritas, in February.

  • The Postal Service released a report into claims that employees tampered with Pennsylvania ballots.
  • They found “no evidence” for the accusations, first brought by Project Veritas.
  • Investigators reviewed the ballots and found no indications of tampering.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Federal investigators looked into accusations from Project Veritas that Pennsylvania postal workers tampered with mail-in ballots and found that the claims were false.

The findings came in a little-noticed February 26 report from the US Postal Service Office of Inspector General. The report drew widespread attention after being posted by the website 21st Century Postal Worker earlier this week.

The investigation was initially launched after Project Veritas, a far-right political operation seeking to undermine media outlets and tech companies, produced an affidavit from a “whistleblower” postal worker, Richard Hopkins, in November.

Hopkins claimed that he overheard other postal service employees in Erie County, Pennsylvania, backdating ballots that arrived in the mail. In the 2020 election, Pennsylvania counted only mail-in ballots sent by Election Day on November 3.

Hopkins recanted the affidavit he signed days later. A video obtained by Insider’s Charles Davis showed that Hopkins had other people in the room as he swore to the affidavit over Zoom.

The Inspector General report said Hopkins admitted he never actually heard other employees talking about backdating ballots in the first place.

“[Hopkins] revised his claims, eventually stating that he had not heard a conversation about ballots at all – rather he saw the Postmaster and Supervisor having a discussion and assumed it was about fraudulent ballot backdating,” the report says. “[Hopkins] acknowledged that he had no evidence of any backdated presidential ballots.”

The fake story was widely cited by Republicans as a reason to doubt the results of the presidential election. Then-President Donald Trump pushed the claims on his now-suspended Twitter account. Sen. Lindsay Graham used it as a basis to request that the Justice Department investigate the election results.

Now-President Joe Biden won the state of Pennsylvania by more than 81,000 votes in the election, and there’s no evidence of widespread voter fraud. The highest-profile case of voter fraud in Pennsylvania is from a man who pretended to be his dead mother to cast an additional vote for Trump in a county he lost anyway.

OIG investigators also said they reviewed all the ballots in the post office where Hopkins worked that were postmarked November 3 and later and did not find any evidence of tampering.

“The physical examination of ballots produced no evidence of any backdated presidential election ballots at the Erie, PA Post Office,” the report said.

Investigators also interviewed several other officials in the post office. None of them said they saw any evidence of backdated ballots, the report said.

The OIG report is yet another failure for Project Veritas, run by the conservative activist James O’Keefe. The organization is known for a series of high-profile “sting operations.” Also in 2020, it released a video that baselessly attempted to link Rep. Ilhan Omar to voter fraud. O’Keefe didn’t immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Project Veritas is perhaps best known for attempting to plant false sexual misconduct allegations against 2017 Republican US Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama. The Washington Post discovered the operation and published a story about how Veritas pushes its falsehoods. The Post won a 2018 Pulitzer Prize for that story and others about Moore’s real-life sexual misconduct allegations.

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After a chaotic year, Biden moves to reclaim the USPS, despite a defiant Postmaster General Louis DeJoy

Louis DeJoy
U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy testifies before a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on slowdowns at the Postal Service ahead of the November elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., August 24, 2020

  • Postmaster DeJoy testified Wednesday at a House Oversight Committee hearing on the postal crisis. 
  • The same day, Biden nominated three people to open positions on the agency’s governing board.
  • If all are confirmed by the Senate, the board would potentially have the votes needed to oust DeJoy
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

After weeks of mounting pressure from Democrats, President Joe Biden named three nominees to open positions on the US Postal Service’s governing board Wednesday, as a first step toward securing control of the agency that became a point of contention under the Trump administration last year.

Biden nominated two Democrats and a voting rights advocate – Ron Stroman, Anton Hajjar, and Amber McReynolds – to the agency’s board of governors, according to The Washington Post. Stroman previously served as the deputy postmaster general, Hajjar acted as former general counsel for the American Postal Workers Union, and McReynolds is the chief executive of the National Vote at Home Institute. 

If all three are confirmed by the Senate, Democrats would essentially gain an advantage over the governing body which would have equal numbers of Democrats and Republicans and one Independent in McReynolds, whose organization is beloved by the left, according to The Post.

The board would then have the potential votes to oust the current postmaster general, Louis DeJoy, who drew criticism last summer over an agency overhaul that led to slower mail service and caused many to worry about the agency’s ability to handle the influx of mail-in ballots for the 2020 general election. 

DeJoy has faced repeated calls for his resignation since the summer, with some progressive lawmakers urging Biden to remove the entire board of governors as a way to fill the body with people who would support removing DeJoy, according to Politico.

Biden’s three nominees also mark a significant step toward diversifying the currently all male, mostly white governing body. Of the Biden nominees, Stroman is Black, McReynolds is a woman, and Hajjar provides legal advice to the American-Arab Anti Discrimination Committee, Politico reported. 

In stark contrast to its governing body, the US Postal Service is disproportionately Black and female when compared to the rest of the federal workforce, the Pew Research Center showed in a May 2020 report.

At a House Oversight and Reform Committee meeting Wednesday, Rep. Cori Bush of Missouri questioned DeJoy on the board’s lack of diversity, comparing the group to a “millionaire white boys’ club.”

DeJoy pushed back, reminding lawmakers the president is responsible for nominating board members and the Senate is responsible for confirming them, while noting the agency “would love to have a diverse board.”

According to Politico, DeJoy “appeared perturbed” at times during Wednesday’s hearing by certain members’ lines of questioning and discussion of the critical media coverage USPS has faced during his tenure. 

He remained defiant, telling lawmakers that he’s not going anywhere and intends to be around “a long time” the outlet reported.

But later that day, the White House signaled it may have other plans for the embattled postmaster. 

“He [Biden] believes the leadership can do better, and we are eager to have the board of governors in place,” Press Secretary Jen Psaki said when asked if the president was interested in replacing DeJoy, according to The Hill. 

Lawmakers also questioned DeJoy on his next plan for the agency, which, according to The Post, will include higher prices and slower delivery. He reportedly told committee members a strategic plan for the USPS should be ready by March.

DeJoy acknowledged the USPS experienced major delivery delays during the holiday season, citing problems with the agency’s air transportation network as the cause. 

The agency has reported billions in losses over the last few years, according to Politico, and the postal board chair Ron Bloom told lawmakers Wednesday that the agency is projected to lose around $160 billion over the next decade if reform measures aren’t taken.

“The years of financial stress, underinvestment, unachievable service standards and lack of operational precision have resulted in a system that does not have adequate resiliency to adjust and adapt to changing circumstances,” DeJoy reportedly testified, arguing the agency’s structural problems preceded his arrival.

Most Republicans defended DeJoy during the hearing and accused their Democratic colleagues of vilifying the postmaster general over how the agency handled mail-in ballots leading up to the 2020 election, which led to “tense exchanges” between members at times during the hearing, The Post reported. 

Several of the operational changes made to the USPS last summer under DeJoy were stopped in August, after public outcry over the mounting crisis. The agency’s internal watchdog found in October the changes combined with COVID-19 staffing issues “negatively impacted the quality and timeliness of mail delivery,” according to Politico.

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Workhorse extends 2-day slide to 57% after losing USPS contract to Oshkosh

Workhorse Truck
Workhorse Truck

  • Workhorse stock extended its two-day slide to 57% on Wednesday after losing a coveted USPS contract to Oshkosh Defense.
  • The electric vehicle maker was a front runner for the ten-year, multi-billion dollar USPS contract to modernize the delivery fleet.
  • Oshkosh received $482 million in the first part of the deal and expects to assemble 50,000 to 165,000 vehicles over the contract period.
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

Workhorse extended its two-day slide to 57% on Wednesday after losing a coveted US Postal Service contract to Oshkosh Defense.

The company’s stock fell over 50% amid increased volatility after the news on Tuesday, triggering multiple trading halts before the stock recovered slightly, ending the day 47.5% lower.

The USPS awarded Oshkosh Defense the first part of a 10-year, multi-billion dollar contract to modernize the postal delivery fleet. An initial investment of $482 million will help finalize the design of the new vehicles for mail and package delivery, and allow Oshkosh to assemble 50,000-165,000 vehicles over the contract period.

The USPS made the agreement an indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract, meaning that after an initial dollar commitment, the Postal Service will be able to order more vehicles throughout the 10-year contract period.

According to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Christopher Ciolino, the total contract could be worth more than $5.7 billion in revenue for Oshkosh.

The USPS had been looking for a partner to help modernize its fleet of postal vehicles since 2015, but when Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA) introduced the Federal Leadership in Energy Efficient Transportation Act in 2019 the postal service finally had the backing to narrow in on a deal.

For a time, the electric vehicle maker Workhorse was thought to be a leader in the competition for the lucrative contract. The USPS commissioned five prototype postal service vehicles and Workhorse partnered with truck builder VT Hackney to produce their own.

Analysts at BTIG said they saw Workhorse securing a portion of the USPS contract as a part of their base case scenario and held a “buy” rating on the company, per CNBC.

But now Oshkosh has secured the contract to make both fuel-efficient internal combustion engines and some battery-electric powertrains for USPS, leaving the pre-revenue EV startup Workhorse in a difficult spot.

In October of last year, short-seller Fuzzy Panda Research alleged that Workhorse destroyed its chances of landing the USPS contract.

According to the short-seller, there were numerous failures including suspension issues, motor outages, and even a parking brake malfunction that led to a postal worker injury.

Workhorse stock was down 9.14% as of 8:44 a.m. ET on Wednesday.

Workhorse chart
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USPS says it’s removing mailboxes and suspending mail collection in several major cities ahead of Biden’s inauguration

us postal service
A person drops a letter into a USPS mailbox during Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on September 7, 2020 in New York City.

  • The US Postal Service will remove some mailboxes and halt collection in several major cities as a safety measure ahead of next week’s presidential inauguration. 
  • States and cities across the country are expecting unrest in the days leading up to January 20. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The US Postal Services said it will remove mailboxes in several major cities as a security measure ahead of Joe Biden’s Inauguration next week. 

As a security measure ahead of the January 20 event, mailboxes in at least 17 states including California and New Jersey, as well as Washington, DC, will be temporarily removed, several press releases from USPS said. 

“It’s part of our normal procedures to keep our employees and customers safe during times of protest or when large crowds are gathered near postal facilities, on postal routes, or by mailboxes,” USPS spokesman David Partenheimer told Insider. 

At least 14 post offices in DC will also be closed on Inauguration Day, the Postal Service said in a statement. 

States and cities are bracing for more civil unrest ahead of Biden’s inauguration. On January 6, supporters of President Donald Trump breached the US Capitol and clashed with law enforcement, halting the joint session of Congress as lawmakers were debating challenges to electoral votes.

Five people died, including a Capitol Police officer and a woman who was shot by law-enforcement officials while participating in the riot.

Afterward, an FBI bulletin warned that in the days leading up to the inauguration, “armed protests” are expected to take place at the US Capitol and state capitols across the country.

The USPS security measure is also in anticipation of the unrest. 

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