The S&P 500 will tumble as much as 10% in the summer as growth peaks, Deutsche Bank predicts

new york stock exchange
The S&P 500 is due a correction, Deutsche Bank said.

  • The S&P 500 will fall between 6% and 10% in the summer before rebounding, Deutsche Bank predicted.
  • The bank’s analysts said rising inflation may unsettle investors, while earnings growth would cool.
  • Investors have become more cautious about US stocks, with many strategists looking towards Europe.
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The S&P 500 is likely to drop as much as 10% in the summer as economic growth peaks and investors lose their nerve, Deutsche Bank has said.

The benchmark US stock index has risen more than 15% so far this year. That has taken it to 4,344, already putting it above Wall Street analysts’ average year-end target of 4,276, as compiled by CNBC.

Deutsche Bank strategists on Tuesday said investors had gotten ahead of themselves and that they expected the index to fall between 6% and 10% in the summer.

The strategists, led Marion Laboure, said one concern is economic growth is likely peaking after the rapid rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more: A weaker economy and stronger dollar threaten to sink the S&P 500 by 11% and send bitcoin tumbling to $12,000, Stifel strategists warn. Here are the 9 industries they recommend hiding in for the rest of 2021.

Laboure and the team said analysts are unlikely to keep upgrading companies’ earnings forecasts, which has been boosting stocks. And they said inflation remains a risk which could unsettle investors, after prices growth hit a 13-year high in the US in May.

However, the Deutsche strategists said the 6% to 10% drop should be a healthy correction for US stocks. “We then see equities rallying back as our baseline remains for strong growth but only a gradual and modest rise in inflation,” they wrote in Deutsche Bank’s quarterly “House View” report.

Investors have become more cautious on US stocks as of late, after a rapid rally in the first few months of the year. Many strategists are looking towards Europe as a place to find more affordable stocks that can benefit from a rebound in the global economy that will help sectors such as financials.

JPMorgan Asset Management said in its mid-year outlook that it expects stocks to rise in the second half of the year, but said investors should expect a bumpier ride as inflation worries “contribute to the jitters.”

Analysts at Barclays said in a recent note: “We believe that concerns over peaking global growth, inflation risk, and a hawkish [Federal Reserve] derailing the market are overstated.

But they said they were only “grudgingly” positive about stocks, given equity prices have already risen sharply in 2021.

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American inflation is extraordinary because the US economic recovery is ‘exceptional,’ JPMorgan says

New York shopping reopening
People walk through downtown Brooklyn on May 03, 2021 in New York City.

  • The US’ massive stimulus response and a unique labor shortage are fueling stronger price growth.
  • Yet the US is recovering faster than its peers and enjoying an unprecedented demand boom, JPMorgan said.
  • This soaring inflation is a byproduct of the country’s “exceptional” recovery, the bank said.
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Inflation in the US is handily outpacing that of other advanced economies, and it’s probably thanks to the country’s stellar recovery, JPMorgan economists said.

With vaccines rolling out and lockdown measures slowly being lifted, the global economy is on the mend. Advanced economies lead the pack, benefitting from massive stimulus measures and more efficient vaccine distribution. Within that group, the US is among the best performers. The country’s economic output is expected to grow at the fastest rate since the 1950s, and some banks are already revising their estimates for 2022 growth higher on hopes for an even smoother rebound.

Yet concerns of soaring inflation have offset some reopening optimism. A popular gauge of US price growth rocketed 0.6% month-over-month in May and 5% year-over-year, exceeding estimates and marking the largest one-year leap since 2008. Where the Federal Reserve has said it expects the overshoot to be temporary, supply bottlenecks threaten to accelerate inflation further through the year.

JPM Inflation
va JPMorgan

The latest inflation readings are unusually strong, but are likely a byproduct of the US’ outperformance, the JPMorgan team led by Bruce Kasman said in a Friday note. Where the World Bank expects advanced economies to grow 5.4% in 2021, it sees US GDP expanding 6.8% and outpacing peers through the following two years.

The strength of the country’s rebound explains why inflation bounced back so suddenly, the team said.

“Although core inflation is tracking above the pre-pandemic pace elsewhere, the US has been exceptional for a number of reasons,” the JPMorgan economists added.

For one, the country’s service industry was hit particularly hard by the pandemic. Services prices dropped a full 2% at the peak of the downturn, surpassing the damage seen in other advanced economies.

The US also embarked on a far more ambitious stimulus rollout. Congress approved roughly $5 trillion in fiscal support during the health crisis. Much of that aid came in the form of direct payments and bolstered unemployment benefits. Once the country began to reopen, that support drove a demand boom that quickly lifted spending above its pre-pandemic peak. By contrast, spending remained weak in Western Europe, where stimulus wasn’t as large or direct, JPMorgan said.

Trends in the US labor market also contributed to the country’s strong recovery and faster inflation, the team added. Where employers laid off workers en masse at the start of the pandemic, they’re now rushing to rehire and service an unprecedented wave of consumer demand. Job openings soared to a record high in April, but the budding labor shortage also saw quits hit a record and payroll growth slow sharply.

The imbalance between worker supply and employer demand has since driven wages sharply higher as businesses struggle to attract workers. The jumps in labor costs and households’ purchasing power will further lift inflation, the economists said.

That pick-up isn’t to be feared, according to the Federal Reserve. The central bank has said it will let inflation run hot in hopes of driving stronger employment and wage growth through the recovery. President Joe Biden similarly praised the trend in a late-May speech, saying the jump in average pay is a “feature,” not a bug, of the US recovery.

Still, the Fed has hinted it has thought about pulling back on some of its monetary support. The Federal Open Market Committee is expected to maintain its accommodative policy stance but hint at plans to taper its emergency asset purchases when it concludes its June meeting on Wednesday.

Policymakers will likely recognize the spike in inflation rates but maintain that the economy remains far from the Fed’s “substantial further progress goals,” JPMorgan said. The first post-pandemic rate hike will probably arrive in late-2023, the team added, leaving plenty of time for the Fed’s ultra-easy policy to drive the recovery that JPMorgan is calling “exceptional” forward.

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Stimulus and COVID fears are keeping millions of Americans from rejoining the labor market, BofA says

hiring sign coronavirus
  • Some 2.5 million Americans won’t rejoin the labor force until late 2021, Bank of America said.
  • Virus fears and boosted unemployment benefits are keeping them from seeking work, the bank added.
  • Retirements and COVID-19 deaths will leave a more permanent drag on participation, BofA said.
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The rapidly accelerating economic recovery is running up against labor shortages. The snags are temporary, but they hint at permanent changes to the US job market because of the coronavirus pandemic, according to Bank of America economists.

Stimulus, COVID-19 vaccinations, and reopening all helped hiring rebound in recent months. March job additions were the strongest since August, and consumer spending gauges suggest healthy demand will keep payroll growth robust into the summer. Yet as businesses rehire in preparation for a pickup in demand, some are reporting difficulties in finding workers.

While some 9.7 million Americans are officially tallied in the government’s unemployment gauges, another 4.6 million workers exited the labor force during the pandemic, the team led by Joseph Song said in a note to clients. More than half of those workers will likely rejoin the labor force by the end of the year, but face a few obstacles before they do so.

For one, fears of catching COVID-19 and its more contagious variants still loom large. Those concerns are likely playing a role inkeeping Americans from rejoining the workforce and looking for jobs, the economists said.

Low-income Americans might also hold off on seeking work because of stimulus’s disincentive effects, the bank added. The Biden administration’s $1.9 trillion support package included a $300-per-week expansion to unemployment insurance through September. While smaller than the CARES Act benefit, the latest boost could be leading some Americans to stay on the sidelines for now, Bank of America said.

“Our estimates suggest that those who previously made less than $32,000 would be better off in the near term to collect UI benefits than work,” the team added.

Still, Bank of America expects those 2.5 million Americans will rejoin the workforce by the fall as vaccination continues and the stimulus benefit fades. The remaining 2.1 million will take much longer to join the job market, or may not rejoin at all.

About 700,000 Americans are expected to have left the workforce due to a mismatch between their skills and available job openings. Training programs can help close the gap but bringing those workers back will take some time, the economists said.

Separately, 1.2 million workers retired during the health crisis and are unlikely to seek work once the country fully reopens. Another 140,000 workers have been lost due to COVID-19 deaths, the team estimated.

These longer-term worker shortfalls will influence economic data in two ways. At first, accelerated hiring will see the unemployment rate fall throughout the year. Tighter labor-market conditions will then lead to faster wage growth as businesses pay more to fill their openings.

BofA
Source: Bank of America Global Research

Yet those encouraging readings will rest on a less optimistic foundation. The millions of Americans that are unlikely to rejoin the workforce until the fall will leave the labor force participation rate well below its pre-pandemic level.

There is a “high risk” the participation rate doesn’t fully recover, and demographic trends could drag participation steadily lower over the next decade, the economists said.

Bank of America reiterated its forecast for the unemployment rate to fall to 4.2% by the end of the year. The benchmark will then return to its pre-pandemic low of 3.5% by the end of 2022, the team said.

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US economic growth will hit 7% this year on major stimulus boost, BofA says in latest upgrade

People Shopping covid NYC
People shopping at the Union Square Greenmarket as New York City continues reopening efforts on December 4, 2020.

  • BofA lifted its 2021 US GDP forecast to 7% from 6.5%, the latest in several upgrades by the bank.
  • The firm sees strong spending already and unemployment falling to 4.5% later this year.
  • The White House’s plan for up to $3 trillion in new spending can further lift growth, the bank said.
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The American reopening is already leading to stronger growth than banks expected. Just ask Bank of America.

On Thursday, BofA economists lifted their 2021 US growth forecast once again on hopes for past and future stimulus accelerating the economic recovery. The upgrade is at least the fourth the bank has made this year.

The team led by Michelle Meyer now expects gross domestic product to grow 7% this year, up from the previous estimate of 6.5%. Output will then reach 5.5% the following year, also an upgrade.

Growth on a fourth-quarter-by-fourth-quarter basis will total 7.7% in 2021 and 4.4% in 2022, the team added. That exceeds the Federal Reserve’s median estimates of 6.2% and 3.4% growth in 2021 and 2022, respectively.

The upward revision is entirely linked to stimulus. The $1.9 trillion measure passed by Democrats earlier this month is already fueling “exceptional consumer spending” according to credit- and debit-card spending data tracked by the bank. Distribution of $1,400 direct payments contributed to a 40% month-over-month spending leap among recipients. The boost might only just be getting started, the economists said in a note to clients.

Total card spending was up a whopping 45% from a year ago and 23% from two years ago for the seven days ending March 20, per BofA data.

“We think consumer spending is about to take off given the one-two punch of stimulus and reopening,” they added.

Hopes for a follow-up spending package added to the bank’s rosier forecast. The White House is organizing a proposal for up to $3 trillion in spending on infrastructure, climate, and education projects to further aid the country’s rebound. Such a plan would drive a more moderate boost to growth over a longer period of time, the bank said.

Tax hikes used to pay for a follow-up spending package could offset some gains, the team added.

Stronger 2021 growth should open the door for a swifter labor market recovery, according to the bank. The team expects a series of encouraging jobs reports starting with the March release scheduled for April 2. Payroll growth is projected to average 950,000 per month in the second quarter and pull the unemployment rate to 4.7% from 6.1%.

The rate will fall more modestly through the rest of the year to 4.5%, the team said. That matches the Fed’s own year-end estimate.

Bank of America’s bullish update follows similarly optimistic forecasts from Wall Street peers. Recent weeks have seen Morgan Stanley, UBS, and Goldman Sachs all lift their own estimates for 2021 GDP growth.

Morgan Stanley remains the most bullish of the bunch, estimating the economy will expand 8.1% this year and return to pre-pandemic output levels by the end of the first quarter. All three banks, along with Bank of America, hold decidedly more hopeful outlooks than the Fed due to expectations for another large-scale spending measure.

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