MAKING BIG MONEY: The ultimate guides to breaking into careers with 6-figure salaries

Caroline Stokes
Caroline Stokes is the CEO of talent agency and executive search firm FORWARD, and an expert on growing your career in management consulting.

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Looking for a career move that can boost cash flow? These professions and positions help add the good kind of zeros to your salary. Read these articles to help you combine a career you love with a paycheck you want – and for advice on how to get there.

Full-time gigs

IT professional: 3 IT professionals who didn’t get a college degree and are now making 6 figures reveal how to succeed in their field

Management consultant: How to get onto the partner track at McKinsey and make millions, according to 3 management-consulting headhunters and a former McKinsey HR manager

Engineer: The best way to teach yourself to code and land a six-figure job, from 5 people who’ve done it

Marketing consultant: The ultimate guide to breaking into marketing consulting and making 6 figures, from people who did it

VC: How to break into venture capital and land a job at a top firm, according to recruiters, managing partners, and executive coaches in the VC space

Crisis manager: Crisis managers are taking center stage during the pandemic – and can make a lucrative living. Here’s how to break into the in-demand role, according to 5 veterans in the industry.

Software engineer: 3 software engineers reveal the steps they took to move up in their careers to make 6-figure salaries

Executive in gaming or esports: The non-engineer’s guide to landing a 6-figure job in online gaming or esports, according to senior executives and CEOs in the space

Freelance or independent gigs

General freelancer: The ultimate guide to going freelance – and making more than you did at a full-time gig

Software engineer: Freelance software engineers making over $100,000 a year reveal how they got started, find clients, and set their rates

Ghostwriter: How to become a freelance ghostwriter, according to someone who left her $50,000-a-year banking job and now makes $80,000 a year on her own time

Graphic designer: The best way to build a client base and make 6 figures as a freelance graphic designer, according to 6 people who are currently doing it

Web designer: How to find clients and market your business as an independent web designer, according to 6-figure freelancers who did it

Presentation designer: The exact email one freelance presentation designer uses to increase her rates – and how she plans to make $400,000 this year

Independent consultant: How 5 executives who left their jobs to become independent consultants now make 6 figures on their own time – and how you could do the same

Real estate agent: How to make 6 figures as an independent real estate agent, according to someone who did it

Dietitian: How to earn a 6-figure salary as a dietitian or nutritionist, according to 4 renowned entrepreneurs in the industry

Personal trainer: How to earn a 6-figure salary as a personal trainer, according to 3 people who are doing it

Online tutor: How to become a highly successful online tutor and make a lucrative living as virtual learning becomes the norm

Poshmark seller: The ultimate guide to earning 6 figures on Poshmark, according to star sellers who’ve done it and gained boatloads of customers

Ecommerce seller: The ultimate guides to using popular platforms like Amazon, Depop, and eBay to start your own online business, sell to a massive audience, and make big money

Massage therapist and birth coach: A New-York-based doula and massage therapist reveals the exact formula that’s helped her build an almost 6-figure business solely by word-of-mouth referrals

Upwork freelancer: Self-employed professionals who’ve made over $100,000 on Upwork reveal how they built lucrative businesses in just a few years on the freelancing platform

Freelancer.com freelancer: How to land gigs and build a 6-figure career on Freelancer.com, according to the CEO and freelancers who’ve done it

Fiverr freelancer: 6-figure sellers on the freelancing platform Fiverr share how they landed clients and built successful businesses online

Read the original article on Business Insider

5 ways remote work is changing the economy for the better

remote work
Remote work has been good in many ways.

Now that vaccines and a massive stimulus package are here, the US economy is uniquely positioned for a great new era in the 2020s.

A major factor underlying the great economic potential of reopening lies with how the pandemic ushered in an era of remote work, which is likely here to stay to some extent in a post-pandemic world.

More than two-thirds of professionals were working remotely during the peak of the pandemic, according to a new report by work marketplace Upwork, and over the next five years, 20% to 25% of professionals will likely be working remotely.

Remote working has caused employees to rethink and better accommodate their priorities in life and employers to rethink operations regarding how they can best work with professionals and create teams, the report stated. But it also hasn’t been without some downsides, such as blurring the lines between work-life balance and causing increased stress.

Overall, though, Upwork found the shift to remote work in the past year has ultimately benefited the economy in five key ways.

(1) Remote workers are more productive

Remote and and online collaboration technology are proving to be helpful with hidden benefits like making teams work better together, reported Douglas Quenqua for Insider. Higher meeting attendance rates, more attentive managers, simplified communication, and more breaks are just a few of the positive changes.

It’s made many more productive. Sixty-one percent of workers said their productivity increased from working remotely, according to an Upwork survey. And an Upwork survey of hiring managers found 32.2% of them said they saw overall productivity rise as of late April, compared to 22.5% that felt it decreased.

These productive effects will only further develop as people adapt more to remote work, new technology is invented, and people will start remote businesses, wrote the report’s author, Adam Ozimek.

(2) Remote work has freed up relocation opportunities

Remote work will redistribute opportunity across the US, Ozimek wrote. Upwork estimated that up to 23 million people plan to relocate.

Richard Florida, urban studies theorist and economics professor at the University of Toronto, has a similar mindset. He previously told Insider remote work will accelerate the movement of families out of superstar cities into suburbs and the 1% who are seeking lower taxes.

“I have long said that we will see the rise of the rest, given the incredible expensiveness and affordability of existing superstar cities,” he said. “But it’s not going to be the rise of everywhere. It’s going to be the rise of a dozen or two dozen places.” These places will consequently attract new talent, changing economic development.

Florida predicted that bigger cities will see a resurgence, though, as the US inches closer to widespread vaccination, reshaped by a newfound focus on interpersonal interaction that facilitates creativity and spontaneity.

(3) Employers are hiring more independent talent

Employers have become more inclined to build hybrid teams made up of both full-time employees and freelance workers, Ozimek wrote. A November Upwork survey that asked about plans for hiring freelancers in the next six months found that 36% of hiring managers plan to hire out more independent talent.

Fortune 1000 companies in particular have been tapping into more diverse talent regardless of matter location, found a recent report by Business Talent Group, a marketplace for independent consultants. Independent talent has especially increased in the C-Suite. There has been a 67% increase over the past year in executives seeking independent talent needs, per the report.

This increases the talent pool and opportunities for workers.

(4) Remote workers are saving time and money

Without daily commutes, workers have more hours and bigger bank accounts.

One year of working remotely has saved people on average nine days from commuting, per Upwork’s research. And car commuters saved around $4,350, including costs to public from their driving.

The time and money saved could boost economic growth and productivity, Robert Gordon, economics professor at Northwestern University, said in a recent UCLA Anderson Forecast interview. The labor force has restructured, with high-paid people working from home and making the same income, he said.

“This shift to remote working has got to improve productivity because we’re getting the same amount of output without commuting, without office buildings, and without all the goods and services associated with that,” Gordon said. “We can produce output at home and transmit it to the rest of the economy electronically.”

(5) Pandemic remote work is different from remote work

“Remote work and remote work during a global pandemic are not the same,” Ozimek wrote.

Many of the struggles with remote work were due to pandemic circumstances – like balancing remote work with child care while schools were closed. In a post-pandemic world, these things won’t be a hindrance and remote employees will be able to revel in fewer interruptions, which Upwork found to be one of the most cited benefits of remote work.

Remote work also won’t always be done from home. Florida thinks neighborhoods will reshape as offices.

“Even as offices decline, the community or the neighborhood or the city itself will take on more of the functions of an office,” he said. “People will gravitate to places where they can meet and interact with others outside of the home and outside of the office.”

Read the original article on Business Insider