Trump calls for Biden to reinstate a foreign travel ban to ‘keep our country safe from radical Islamic terrorism’

trump grifting
Former president Donald Trump said in a statement on Monday night that the travel ban should be reinstated to keep the US safe from radical Islamic terrorism.

  • Trump called for Biden to reinstate the travel ban to keep the US safe from radical Islamic terrorists.
  • Biden revoked Trump’s travel ban, which primarily affected predominantly Muslim countries, on his first day in office.
  • Trump did not name the countries he thought should be subject to the travel ban.
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Former President Donald Trump is calling on Biden to reinstate his travel ban to keep the US safe from “radical Islamic terrorism.”

In a statement released on Monday night, Trump advocated that the controversial policy, which mostly affected those traveling from predominantly Muslim countries, should be put back in place.

“If Joe Biden wants to keep our country safe from radical Islamic terrorism, he should reinstitute the foreign country travel ban and all of the vetting requirements on those seeking admission that go with it, along with the refugee restrictions I successfully put in place,” Trump wrote.

He then added that “terrorists operate all over the world and recruit online.”

“To keep terrorism and extremism out of our country, we need to have smart, commonsense rules in place so we don’t repeat the many immigration mistakes made by Europe, and the USA prior to ‘Trump’,” he wrote.

Trump did not outline in his memo which countries he specifically thought should be banned at this juncture, but most people from Syria, Iran, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, North Korea, and Venezuela were prohibited from traveling to the US in 2017.

The list was broadened in 2020 to include immigrants and those traveling from Myanmar, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Nigeria, Sudan, and Tanzania.

It is not clear what vetting requirements Trump was referring to in the memo released on Monday, but the former president did outline early in his presidency what he called an “extreme vetting” process for immigrants, which included a values test for whether immigrants’ views on gay rights, gender equality and religious freedoms, among other things, aligned with “non-extremist views.”

Biden overturned the travel ban on his first day in office, issuing an executive order to revoke the Trump-era policy.

Insider reported in March that the State Department will now allow those who were earlier denied entry into the US as a result of the travel ban to either re-apply for entry or appeal to have the decision reconsidered.

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Those refused entry to the US under Trump’s Muslim ban policy can get a new decision, State Department says

muslim ban protest
People protest the Muslim travel ban outside the Supreme Court on June 26, 2018.

  • People denied entry under Trump’s travel ban could reapply, the State Department said on Monday.
  • Those who were denied on or after January 20, 2020, would not need to resubmit their applications.
  • Those who were denied before January 20, 2020, would have to submit new applications.
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A majority of those denied entry into the US as a result of travel bans imposed by former President Donald Trump can either apply to have the decision reconsidered or re-apply, the State Department announced on Monday.

On January 20, Biden issued an executive order revoking the ban on travel from majority-Muslim countries.

Biden gave the State Department 45 days to provide a report with a proposal on how to handle the applications of those who were denied because of the two travel ban measures Trump implemented.

Most people from Syria, Iran, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, North Korea, and Venezuela were prohibited from traveling to the US under a plan initially introduced in 2017. In 2020, Trump added immigrants and travelers from Myanmar, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Nigeria, Sudan, and Tanzania to the list.

The State Department said those who got a final refusal on their application on or after January 20, 2020 “could seek re-adjudication without resubmitting their application forms or paying any additional fees, provided the underlying visa petitions remain valid.”

Those who were denied before January 20, 2020, would have to reapply and pay a new application fee.

US law bars people who were selected as part of the diversity visa lottery between 2017 and 2020 to be issued visas if they have not gotten them already, the statement said.

The Department said while they’re working to make sure those impacted can be helped as soon as possible, the pandemic has made it difficult to process visas.

“As the Department works to serve affected applicants as quickly as possible, the health and safety of our workforce and customers remains paramount. The COVID-19 pandemic, and the health safeguards it has necessitated, continue to severely impact the number of visas our embassies and consulates abroad are able to process,” the statement read.

“Our team in Washington and around the world continue to work tirelessly to find ways to increase the number of immigrant visa appointments, and will continue to do so in the coming months.”

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