How to watch swimming at the Tokyo Olympics – the qualifying heats begin on July 24

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Katie Ledecky
Olympic swimming events will be broadcast live on NBC and USA.

  • Tokyo Olympic swimming events start on July 24 and conclude July 31.
  • Swimming events will air on USA and NBC via live TV streaming services.
  • On the USA team, expectations are high for Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel.

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Swimming events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics start on July 24 and continue daily until July 31. Live coverage will be broadcast on NBC and the USA network.

The USA team has several strong competitors in women’s and men’s divisions, but all eyes will be on Katie Ledecky when she gets in the water. Ledecky already has an impressive collection of five gold medals and one silver medal coming into the Tokyo Olympics. If she snags three more gold medals in Tokyo, Ledecky will tie swimming legend Jenny Thompson as the winningest female US Olympian of all time.

In the men’s division, Caeleb Dressel is expected to lead the pack after his impressive showing at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Dressel earned two gold medals during the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

How to watch Olympic swimming

Live broadcasts of Olympic swimming events are split between two channels: USA and NBC. For both men’s and women’s events, you can watch the preliminary heats on USA and the finals on NBC. Swimming heats will air in the mornings starting around 6 a.m. ET, and final races will air later in the evening during primetime coverage.

If you already have access to NBC and USA through a pay-TV provider, you can also stream every swimming event live via the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com.

If you don’t have cable, you can get NBC and USA through a variety of live TV streaming services. Sling TV is the cheapest subscription service for watching all the Olympic swimming events. New members can get their first month for just $10 (regularly $35). NBC is only offered in select markets, however, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, and YouTube TV are additional live streaming services with access to both channels for watching Olympic swimming, but these options are more expensive at $65/month each.

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Viewers who can’t tune into events live can stay caught up on the action by catching highlights and primetime coverage on NBC. For free swimming highlights and videos from additional Olympic events, you can download the Peacock app or visit NBCOlympics.com.

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Men’s Olympic swimming schedule

Caeleb Dresse stands during Olympic trials in 2021.
Caeleb Dressel.

July 24

Event Time Channel
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 7:55 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 9:52 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:33 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:22 a.m. ET USA
100m Backstroke (Heats) 7:19 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:10 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:31 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:05 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:29 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:43 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:17 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Heats) 7:37 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 9:49 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:21 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:26 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
200m Backstroke (Heats) 6:25 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:15 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:04 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 10:37 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 11:08 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:16 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:50 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:11 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC

Women’s Olympic swimming schedule

Katie Ledecky at the 2021 Olympic Trials
Katie Ledecky.

July 24

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:30 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:15 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:40 p.m. ET NBC
400m Individual Medley (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
100m Backstroke (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:59 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 7:39 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 10:20 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:53 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:56 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 7:32 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:51 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:17 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 10:58 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:57 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:52 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:34 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:53 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 10:28 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:31 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
800m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Heats) 7:08 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:24 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:36 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:46 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:32 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC
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Sling TV is the cheapest way to watch the Olympics without cable

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Everything you need to know about SlingTV 2x1
Sling TV is giving all subscribers free access to the Olympic Channel during Tokyo 2020.

  • If you want to watch the Olympics without cable, Sling TV is one of your cheapest options.
  • New subscribers can get their first month of Sling’s Blue plan for just $10 (normally $35/month).
  • NBC, NBCSN, and USA are all included on Sling Blue, and the Olympic Channel is free through August 8.

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The Tokyo 2020 Olympics have arrived, and if you’re looking for a way to watch the games without signing up for a pricey cable service, Sling TV is offering special deals for new and returning subscribers throughout the Olympics.

New Sling TV subscribers can get their first month of Sling Blue for just $10 – a $25 discount from the full $35/month price. Sling TV is also making the Olympic Channel and NBC Universo free to all subscribers. Those channels usually require additional packages for an extra fee. The Olympic Channel is free through August 8, while Universo is free through September 5.

Certain Olympic events will air on CNBC, which costs $6 with Sling’s news extra package. If you’re interested in watching Olympic golf, you’ll have to add the sports extra package for the Golf Channel.

All together, new Sling TV subscribers can get every channel needed to watch the Olympics for $27 during their first month of service, while current subscribers will pay $52.

How to watch the Olympics on Sling TV

To watch all of NBC’s coverage of the Olympics on Sling TV you’ll need to sign up for Sling Blue, the Sling news extra package, and Sling’s sports extra package. This will get you live TV access to NBC, NBC Sports, USA, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and NBC Universo.

Sling Blue costs $35/month. New members can get their first month for $10. Sling’s news extra package costs $6/month, and the sports extra package costs $11/month. This brings the total price to $27 for new members for their first month, or $52 a month for existing members.

Access to NBC will be based on your local affiliate station and support is only available in select markets. You can check whether your local NBC network is available on Sling here.

Sling Blue comes with 50 hours of DVR space to record live TV, and up to three devices can watch at the same time with a single account. The Sling TV app is available on most streaming TV platforms, including Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Android devices, and Chromecast. You can also download the app on LG and Samsung smart TVs, and Xbox consoles. On your phone or computer you can watch Sling via Sling.com.

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What else can I watch on Sling TV?

Sling TV Blue, the package needed for Olympic networks like NBC Sports and USA, offers a wide range of live TV channels, including the NFL Network, TNT, the Food Network, Comedy Central, and the Fox family of networks.

Sling features on-demand content like movies and classic TV shows from select channels as well. You can find a full breakdown of Sling TV channels and packages here.

Other ways to watch the Olympics

If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s various channels, you can use your account information to stream every Olympic event online via the NBC Sports app or the NBCOlympics website. You can also visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule with specific channel information for each event.

NBC’s streaming service, Peacock, will also feature daily highlights, docuseries, and commentary for free. Peacock is available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs. You can read more about how to follow the Olympics on our main hub.

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The 10 US colleges best-represented at the Tokyo Olympic Games

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI - JUNE 27: Jordan Chiles competes on the uneven bars during the Women's competition of the 2021 U.S. Gymnastics Olympic Trials at America’s Center on June 27, 2021 in St Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images)
First-time Olympic gymnast Jordan Chiles is also an incoming freshman at UCLA.

  • Polina Marinova is the founder of The Profile, a newsletter that profiles successful people and companies.
  • The following is a recent The Profile post, republished here with permission.
  • In it, she breaks down the top 10 US colleges that are sending the most alumni and athletes to the 2020 Olympics.

In March of 2020, Brooke Forde packed up and left campus as Stanford University and colleges around the nation paused in-person classes due to a global pandemic.

Then, she found out something else was being put on hold: The 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Forde, a student at Stanford, had also been a first-time Olympic hopeful. The last few months have served as a stress test for the 22-year-old swimmer, whose road to Tokyo has anything but straightforward. She overcame two COVID-19 scares, a mid-meet panic attack, and a nerve-wracking Olympic Trials experience.

Despite it all, she ultimately secured a spot on Team USA at the Olympic Games and got to say: “I’m Brooke Forde, and I’m a Tokyo Olympian.”

Joining her in Tokyo will be 31 other current and former Stanford athletes – among them swimmers Katie Ledecky, Simone Manuel, Torri Huske, and Regan Smith.

Stanford students and alumni will participate in swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, volleyball, gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, and track & field this year, according to information provided to The Profile by the US Olympic Committee.

The university has produced at least one medalist in every Olympics in which the US has competed since 1912, including a school-record 27 medals in 2016.

More than 75% of the 2020 US Olympic team competed in collegiate athletics at the varsity and club levels.

Here are the 10 US colleges that will be best-represented at the Olympic Games:

(Note: This list includes athletes who have already finished their collegiate careers, those currently competing, and incomers who have signed National Letters of Intent. If an athlete competed at two different schools, they have been counted at the school they have most recently attended.)

10. University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame.
University of Notre Dame.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Fencing, basketball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Mariel Zagunis, a Notre Dame alumna, is the most decorated US fencer of all time. A two-time Olympic gold medalist, Zagunis will embark on her fifth consecutive trip to the Olympics this year.

“I’ve done a lot for my sport already,” she said. “I’m not trying to prove anything to anybody except to myself that I’m still a good fencer and I’m capable of beating the best in the world and becoming Olympic champion once again.”

Read a profile on Zagunis here.

9. Penn State University

Penn State University
Penn State University.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Soccer, fencing, wrestling, volleyball, rugby, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: When she was growing up, Alyssa Naeher had dreams of making it to the WNBA.

“If I’m being honest, basketball was my first love,” said Naeher, an ’09 Penn State graduate. “I wanted to play basketball at UConn. We obviously didn’t really have a [pro women’s soccer league] of our own yet.”

Today, Naeher has channeled that same passion into become a confident and record-setting goalkeeper for the Chicago Red Stars and United States Women’s National Soccer Team. “The only thing I can control is my effort on the field – working hard, keeping my head down, being there, pushing myself, pushing my teammates, and trying to get better,” she said.

Read a profile on Naeher here.

8. University of Oregon

University of Oregon
University of Oregon.

Number of athletes: 11

Events: Softball, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Freshman Micah Williams is University of Oregon’s star sprinter. He has already won a national indoor championship after tying a school record with a 60-meter time of 6.49 seconds. Williams and fellow Olympian Cravon Gillespie became the first Oregon men’s sprinters in program history to make the US Olympic team.

Read a profile on Williams here.

7. University of Florida

University of Florida campus

Number of athletes: 14

Events: Softball, basketball, swimming, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Caeleb Dressel has been called “swimming’s reluctant star” for a reason. Dressel constantly draws comparisons to legendary Olympian Michael Phelps, and he couldn’t be less interested in external expectations or comparisons.

“I swim different events than Michael,” he said. “I’m not chasing someone else’s goals. I want to chase my own.”

Dressel, who graduated from the University of Florida in 2018, has claimed 15 world championship medals, 13 of them gold, since 2017, making him one of the biggest stars in swimming. At the Tokyo Olympics, he is a favorite to win six gold medals for Team USA.

Read a profile of Dressel here.

6. University of Georgia

University of Georgia
The University of Georgia.

Number of athletes: 15

Events: Swimming and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Swimmer Allison Schmitt is an eight-time Olympic medalist with four golds, two silvers, and two bronzes. Schmitt qualified for her fourth Olympics, which puts her at one short of the record for American women’s swimming.

Schmitt, who graduated from the University of Georgia in 2013, said, “This one is definitely the most emotional, and I think it’s special to be here at 31 [years old] and have everyone in the stands that’s here supporting me … and have been along on this journey the past four years.”

Read a profile on Schmitt here.

5. University of Southern California

usc
The statue called ‘Tommy Trojan’, the mascot of USC from 1930 located at the center of the USC campus on September 23, 2015, three weeks before the USC announced they have fired Trojans football coach Steve Sarkisian.

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Water polo, swimming, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Isaiah Jewett may be a track star at USC, but he’s also a student who needs to complete his homework. In June, he qualified for his first Olympic Games after finishing second in the men’s 800-meter run. In his post-race press conference, he revealed that although he was excited, he was also really worried about completing his 10-page paper that was due in just a few hours.

“My legs feel really good. Mentally I’m tired. I need to sleep. I have a 10-page essay due tonight,” he said. “I’m mentally trying to re-focus and get that done because it’s due tonight and my teacher didn’t give me an extension.” He submitted his paper at 11:50 p.m. that night.

Read a profile on Jewett here.

4. University of California, Berkeley

UC Berkeley cover image
UC Berkeley campus

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Swimming, water polo, rowing, soccer, golf, rugby, table tennis, and softball

Athlete Spotlight: Twenty-four-year-old Collin Morikawa has already made history. Earlier this month, he became the first golfer in history to win his debut at two different major events. Additionally, he became the eighth golfer ever to win two majors before turning 25. More so than anything, Morikawa is really charismatic.

Here’s how writer Kyle Porter described him: “He’s clean-cut and buttoned-up. He’s fresh and likable. He has not made any public mistakes nor had to watch himself suffer.” Morikawa is considered one of the top US golfers set to compete at the Olympics. This ’19 Cal graduate is definitely one to watch.

Read a profile on Morikawa here.

3. University of Texas

University of Texas
University of Texas

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Diving, swimming, rowing, basketball, softball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Windle, who is returning for a fifth year at the University of Texas, executed a near perfect dive during the Olympic trials. After three attempts at qualifying for the Olympic Games, Windle’s efforts finally paid off. Windle has a long history of not giving up, though.

Born in Cambodia, Windle was placed in an orphanage about a year after his parents died tragically. Meanwhile, a retired naval officer named Jerry Windle wanted to start a family but struggled to adopt as a single, gay man in the US He read about someone who had adopted a child from Cambodia, and five months later, he found and adopted Jordan, who had been suffering from malnutrition, scabies, intestinal parasites and severe infections. Today, the father-son duo are inseparable.

“I hope that Jordan’s story, our story, inspires people to give children the opportunity to do amazing things,” Jerry said.

Read a profile on Windle here.

2. UCLA

UCLA

Number of athletes: 21

Events: Gymnastics, soccer, softball, baseball, basketball, tennis, volleyball (court), beach volleyball, and water polo

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Chiles has a lot going on in 2021. She is an incoming freshman at UCLA, and she’s also a first-time Olympian competing alongside teammates including gymnastics legend Simone Biles. Chiles is expected to be a Tokyo breakout star three years after nearly quitting gymnastics.

“I didn’t think the sport wanted me anymore,” she said. “So I went in the opposite direction.” She had lost all confidence and motivation – until she had a talk with Biles. Biles took on the role of Chiles’s big sister, repeating to her these three words: “You belong here.”

Read a profile on Chiles here.

1. Stanford University

Stanford University

Number of athletes: 32

Events: Swimming, artistic swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: At the 2016 Olympics, Katie Ledecky was an incoming freshman at Stanford University. In 2021, she’s a recent grad with a degree in psychology and a total of six Olympic medals (five gold, one silver). In the last year, the 24-year-old competitive swimmer has done more solo training than ever before. It makes the already unusual run-up to the Tokyo Olympics even more so for the most dominant swimmer on the planet.

“The most important expectations are the ones that I have for myself,” she said. “I do a pretty good job of sticking to those and not seeing what kinds of medal counts or times that people are throwing out about what I could accomplish if everything goes perfectly.”

Read a profile on Ledecky here.

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How to watch soccer at the Tokyo Olympics – women’s group matches begin on July 21

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USWNT US Women's National Team Soccer
US women’s national soccer team members Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe celebrate.

  • Olympic soccer will begin before the opening ceremonies with women’s group matches starting July 21.
  • Games will air on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel via cable and live streaming services.
  • The women’s gold medal match is August 5, while the men’s gold medal will be decided on August 7.

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Soccer will be one of the first sports to begin competition at the Tokyo Olympics, with women’s group stage matches starting on July 21 and the men’s matches starting on July 22. The Tokyo Opening Ceremonies will be held on July 23 and Olympic soccer competition will continue through August 7.

A total of 24 nations will compete in soccer during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with 16 qualifying men’s teams and 12 women’s teams. You can watch select games on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel through cable and live streaming services.

While Olympic men’s soccer has been restricted to players 23-years-old and younger since 1992, the one-year delay of the 2020 games led to the age limit being increased to 24. Men’s teams can also name up to three senior players above the age limit to compete in the Olympics. Brazil won the men’s soccer gold medal as the host nation in 2016, led by international superstar Neymar.

Women’s teams don’t have roster restrictions, and the US women’s national soccer team, or USWNT, is bringing back most of its players from the 2019 World Cup championship squad. The Americans plan to return to gold medal form after losing in the quarter-finals of the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The US Men’s soccer team was eliminated from Olympic contention after a loss to Honduras in a June qualifying tournament. USWNT has won four Olympic gold medals including a 2012 victory over Japan, while the men’s team has never won a gold medal and hasn’t qualified for the Olympics since 2008.

How to watch Olympic soccer

You can watch select Olympic soccer games on NBC Sports, USA, the Olympic Channel, Telemundo, and NBC Universo. Most of the games in Tokyo will air during the early morning hours in the US. The most important Olympic soccer matches will air on USA and NBC Sports Network.

If you have an authenticated pay-TV provider with access to the required NBC stations, you can stream every Olympic soccer match via NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app.

If you don’t have a cable provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling TV is the most affordable choice to get every Olympic soccer channel. The Sling Blue plan starts at $35/month for access to NBC, NBCSN, and USA. New subscribers can get their first month for just $10. You can add the Olympic channel for an additional $11/month with the Sports Extra package.

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If you can’t watch the games live, NBC will provide daily highlights and evening recaps of each day’s events. In addition to primetime coverage on NBC, you can visit NBCOlympics.com or download Peacock, NBC’s streaming service, to watch free soccer highlights and clips from other sports.

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Women’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of women’s soccer matches for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 21

Event Time Channel
Great Britain vs. Chile (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
China vs. Brazil (Group F) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Sweden (Group G) 4:30 a.m. ET USA
Japan vs. Canada (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

Zambia vs. Netherlands (Group F) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Australia vs. New Zealand (Group G) 7:30 a.m. ET USA

July 24

Event Time Channel
Chile vs. Canada (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET TBA
China vs. Zambia (Group F) 4 a.m. ET TBA
Sweden vs. Australia (Group G) 4:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network
Japan vs. Great Britain (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET TBA
Netherlands vs. Brazil (Group F) 7 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. United States 7:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network and Telemundo

July 27

Event Time Channel
Sweden vs. New Zealand (Group G)

4 a.m. ET

TBA
United States v Australia (Group G) 4 a.m. ET USA
Chile vs. Japan (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Canada vs. Great Britain (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Brazil vs. Zambia (Group F) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Netherlands vs. China (Group F)

7:30 a.m. ET

TBA

July 30

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Women’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET TBA

August 2

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals one 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals two 7 a.m. ET USA

August 5

Event Time Channel
Women’s bronze medal match 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s gold medal match 10 p.m. ET USA

Men’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of men’s soccer matches announced for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 22

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Spain (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Mexico vs. France (Group A) 4 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo
New Zealand vs. South Korea (Group B) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Cote d’Ivoire vs. Saudi Arabia (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Argentina vs. Australia (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Japan vs. South Africa (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Honduras vs. Romania (Group B) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Brazil vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo

July 25

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Argentina (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
France vs. South Africa (Group A) 4 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. Honduras (Group B) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Brazil vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Australia vs. Spain (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Universo
Japan vs. Mexico (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Telemundo
Romania vs. South Korea (Group B) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Saudi Arabia vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET TBA

July 28

Event Time Channel
Saudi Arabia vs. Brazil (Group D) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Germany vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Romania vs. New Zealand (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
South Korea vs. Honduras (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Australia vs. Egypt (Group C) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Spain vs. Argentina (Group C) 7 a.m. ET Universo
France vs. Japan (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

South Africa vs. Mexico (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo

July 31

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET USA

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals one 4 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s semifinals two 7 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s bronze medal match 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal match 7:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
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Toyota canceled plans to run Olympics-themed commercials during the games, despite being a major corporate sponsor of the event

Toyota Logo
  • Tokyo Olympics sponsor Toyota won’t air Olympics-related TV commercials during the games.
  • Top Toyota executives are also skipping the Olympics opening ceremony.
  • COVID-19 cases are on the rise in Tokyo, and many are calling for the games to be canceled amid safety concerns.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Toyota Motor Corp., one of the top corporate sponsors of the Tokyo Olympics, is pulling its Olympics-related TV commercials from rotation, a senior company executive announced on Monday.

Additionally, Toyota’s CEO Akio Toyoda and other top executives will skip the Olympic opening ceremony.

Jun Nagata, the company’s chief communications officer, told Japanese outlet Yomiuri that Toyota would still supply a fleet of more than 3,000 vehicles to the games.

Earlier this year, Toyota filmed a TV spot featuring several of the 200 or so athletes the company sponsored.

Nagata declined to specify why exactly the company was pulling its Olympics-themed spots, though he said that there are still “things that are not understood” about the games, which kick off this Friday, will operate.

Some are speculating that the move is meant to distance the carmaker from the beleaguered and increasingly unpopular games.

COVID-19 infections in Tokyo continue to rise. Last week, the city reported the highest number of new COVID-19 cases in two months, prompting many to call for the games to be canceled.

A survey conducted by conservative Japanese news site Asahi Shimbun in June found that around 48% of the Japanese public wanted the games to be canceled.

On Sunday, two members of the South African soccer team tested positive for COVID-19. On Monday, 17-year-old American tennis star Coco Gauff announced she’d be dropping out of the games after testing positive for the virus.

Insider has reached out to Toyota for comment.

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Biden said ‘the rules are the rules’ when asked about Sha’Carri Richardson’s suspension for marijuana use

Joe Biden
US President Joe Biden speaks on the economy at Cuyahoga Community College Manufacturing Technology Center, on May 27, 2021, in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • President Joe Biden said “the rules are the rules” when asked if Sha’Carri Richardson’s suspension was fair.
  • But the president went on to question if the rules should remain that way.
  • Richardson, 21, tested positive for THC, the psychoactive component in cannabis, at the US Olympic Team Trials.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden said “the rules are the rules” on Saturday when a reporter asked whether he thought Sha’Carri Richardson’s one-month suspension for marijuana use was fair.

But the president went on to question if the rules should remain that way.

“The rules are the rules,” Biden told reporters. “And everybody knows the rules going in, but whether it should remain that way is a different issue.”

“I was really proud of the way she responded,” he added.

Read more: Banning Sha’Carri Richardson from the Olympics for weed is outdated. So is the idea that weed slows you down.

Richardson, 21, tested positive for THC, the psychoactive component in cannabis, at the US Olympic Team Trials, where she finished first in the 100-meter race. The suspension in light of the positive test put her qualification for the Tokyo Olympics in jeopardy.

Richardson said she took marijuana after she learned from a reporter that her biological mother died.

“To hear that information come from a complete stranger, it was definitely triggering. It was definitely nerve-shocking.” she said on NBC’s Today show. “No offense to him at all, he was just doing his job, but it put me in a state of mind of emotional panic.”

“I’m not making an excuse or looking for empathy in my case,” she said. “However, being in that position in my life, finding out something like that … Dealing with the relationship I have with my mother, that definitely was a very heavy topic on me.”

Biden’s comments came after Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez blasted the decision on Friday.

“The criminalization and banning of cannabis is an instrument of racist and colonial policy,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote in a post on Twitter. “The IOC should reconsider its suspension of Ms. Richardson and any athletes penalized for cannabis use.”

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How to watch the Tokyo Olympics, starting with the opening ceremony on July 23

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Simone Biles
Simone Biles will lead the US Women’s Gymnastics team at her second Olympic Games.

  • The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo will run from July 23 to August 8 after a one-year delay.
  • The opening ceremony will broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET, with a primetime replay.
  • NBC will provide live coverage on its networks, along with highlights on its Peacock streaming service.

The Tokyo Olympic Games will hold its opening ceremonies on July 23 after a one-year delay, welcoming thousands of athletes from 205 countries and states. The international competition will continue through August 8 with events from 33 different sports.

NBC will be the primary broadcaster for the Olympics in the United States, including the opening ceremonies and daily coverage. The Tokyo Opening Ceremony will be broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC, with a primetime replay scheduled for 7:30 p.m. ET. The opening ceremony will include special performances by Japanese artists, the parade of nations, and the lighting of the Olympic torch.

Live broadcasts and streamed events from Tokyo will be available every day on NBC and other NBC affiliate networks. You can find a daily schedule for all 33 sports at NBCOlympics.com, but the broadcast details for each event haven’t been set yet. Free highlights will also be available on Peacock, NBC’s streaming service.

Because the event was originally planned for last year, this year’s Summer Olympics are still being called the Tokyo 2020 Games. Japan hosted the Winter Olympics in 1998, and last hosted the summer games in 1964. International fans can’t enter the country for the Olympics because of ongoing concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic, but local spectators will attend with restricted crowds.

How to watch the Olympics

Sha'Carri Richardson celebrates winning the Women's 100 Meter final on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials
Sha’Carri Richardson was a favorite among US Olympics qualifiers, but her place on the team is in doubt following reports of a positive cannabis test.

The opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics will be broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC. The ceremony will be rebroadcast multiple times starting at 7:30 p.m. ET on July 23 for primetime audiences You can watch the opening ceremony on your local NBC affiliate station, or stream it via NBCOlympics.com and the NBC Sports app.

Olympic coverage will be spread across multiple NBC Networks, including NBC Sports Network, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and USA; Telemundo and Universo will carry Spanish language coverage. NBC’s streaming service Peacock will feature daily highlights, docuseries, and commentary for free.

(Free Plan) (small)

The NBC Sports and Peacock apps are available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs. You can visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule, but NBC still has to announce which channels will broadcast specific events. We’ll update this page with detailed schedule information once it’s available.

If you don’t already have a cable or TV provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like YouTube TV, Hulu Live TV, Sling TV, or FuboTV to watch channels like NBC, NBC Sports, and USA. Of those options, Sling’s Blue plan is the most affordable at $35 a month ($10 for your first month).

TV (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)

Key dates for the Tokyo Olympics

Katie Ledecky
US swimming star Katie Ledecky has won five Olympic gold medals, the most for any female swimmer.

  • July 21 – Olympic competition begins with softball and soccer matches
  • July 23 – Tokyo Olympics Opening Ceremony
  • July 24 to July 31 – Swimming: daily coverage at 9:30 p.m. ET
  • July 27 – Gymnastics: Women’s team final, 6:45 a.m. ET
  • July 29 – Gymnastics: Women’s individual all-around, 6:50 a.m. ET
  • July 31 – Track and Field: Women’s 100-meter finals, 6 a.m. ET
  • August 1 – Track and Field: Men’s 100-meter finals, 6 a.m. ET
  • August 6 – Basketball: Men’s gold medal game, 10:30 p.m. ET
  • August 8 – Last day of the Tokyo Olympics
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Rep. Dan Crenshaw calls for Olympic athlete Gwen Berry to be ‘removed from the team’ for national anthem protest

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Tex., appears on Fox News to call for US Olympian Gwen Berry to be "removed from the team" after she protested with a T-shirt during the national anthem.
Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Tex.

  • Rep. Dan Crenshaw on Monday called for a US Olympic athlete to be “removed from the team.”
  • Crenshaw took issue with hammer thrower Gwen Berry’s protest during the national anthem.
  • The Texas Republican has frequently derided cancel culture in media appearances.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw of Texas called for one of the top American track and field stars to be “removed from the team” after she protested the national anthem during qualifiers for the upcoming Tokyo Olympics.

Gwen Berry, a hammer thrower and world record holder, turned her back to the flag during the national anthem over the weekend and held an “activist athlete” t-shirt over her face.

Crenshaw has frequently derided cancel culture in media appearances on Fox News and the podcast circuit, calling it a “radical progressive religion.”

However, in a Fox News appearance on Monday morning, the Texas Republican said Berry should lose her spot for trying to make a political point on the podium.

“We don’t need any more activist athletes,” Crenshaw said. “You know, she should be removed from the team. The entire point of the Olympic team is to represent the United States of America. That’s the entire point, OK.”

“So it’s one thing when these NBA players do it – OK, fine, we’ll just stop watching – but now the Olympic team?” he continued. “And it’s multiple cases of this. They should be removed. That should be the bare minimum requirement.”

Berry said she was not expecting the anthem to be played during the ceremony at the winner’s podium, where she held the third spot with a bronze medal for her performance. “The Star Spangled Banner” isn’t usually played after American qualifying meets like it would be with other nations present at the Olympics or other international competitions.

“I feel like it was set up,” she said after the meet. “I feel like they did that on purpose, and I was pissed, to be honest.”

Crenshaw attributed Berry’s protest to the academic and legal framework of critical race theory, which examines the effect of racism in laws and policies that have a disproportionate impact on people of color, regardless of intent.

Critical race theory has increasingly become an obsession for Republicans in fundraising and messaging efforts.

“Taking it a couple levels deeper, this is the pathology that occurs when we’re teaching critical race theory in our institutions … It results in these displays of hatred towards our own country, and it’s gotta stop,” Crenshaw said.

American Olympians have long used their visibility to draw attention to political and social causes, most notably with the 1968 Olympics “Black power” salute from track stars Tommie Smith and John Carlos.

Later in a press conference following the meet, Berry said her role as an athlete is secondary to fighting racism.

“I don’t need to do anything sport-wise,” she said. “What I need to do is speak for my community, to represent my community, and to help my community. Because that’s more important than sports.”

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Tokyo Olympics organizers are handing out more than 150,000 condoms to athletes – but also asking recipients not to use them at the Olympic village

A single bed with a blanket reading Tokyo 2020 in Japan
A bed in the Olympic village in Tokyo.

  • Organizers of the Tokyo Olympics plan to hand out more than 150,000 condoms to athletes.
  • They’ll also ask the more than 11,000 athletes at the games to continue social distancing.
  • “The distributed condoms are not meant to be used at the Olympic Village,” an official told AFP.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Organizers of the Tokyo Olympics plan to hand out more than 150,000 condoms to the world’s top athletes – but will also ask them to not use them at the Olympic village, according to multiple reports.

The organizing committee made the request last week, Agence France-Presse reported.

The wire service said Japan’s condom industry feared an “anticlimax” at the event, which is expecting to bring more than 11,000 athletes to Tokyo. Many will stay in the Olympic Village.

A guard in blue stands in front of the Tokyo Olympics Athletes Village fence
A guard at the Olympic village in May.

Condoms have been handed out to Olympians since at least the 1988 Summer Olympics in South Korea.

At the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, about 110,000 condoms were handed out, Insider reported at the time.

About 100,000 were distributed during the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. About 450,000 male and female condoms were handed out at the Rio Olympics in 2016.

Athletes arriving in Tokyo this summer will be told to continue social distancing. They’ll be asked to bring the condoms to their home countries as a way of raising awareness of HIV and AIDS, Reuters reported.

When the International Olympic Committee rolled out its rules in February, they included a ban on physical contact between athletes. RT reported on the social media backlash, quoting a Twitter user who said there would be a “0% chance they will not be having sex.”

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Masayoshi Son, the CEO of SoftBank and the 2nd-richest person in Japan, joins the growing chorus of voices calling to cancel the Tokyo Olympics

masayoshi son softbank
Masayoshi Son is Japan’s second-richest person, with a net worth of more than $30 billion.

  • Billionaire SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son has joined calls to cancel the Tokyo Olympics.
  • “Currently more than 80% of people want the Olympics to be postponed or canceled. On what authority is it being forced through?” Son wrote on Twitter on Saturday.
  • Tokyo and other parts of Japan are still under a state of emergency amid a new COVID-19 wave.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Billionaire SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son has joined growing calls to cancel the Tokyo Olympics as Japan struggles with a new coronavirus surge and many parts of the country remain under a state of emergency.

“Currently more than 80% of people want the Olympics to be postponed or canceled. Who and on what authority is it being forced through?” Son wrote on Twitter in Japanese on Saturday.

Son, who founded SoftBank in 1981 and has invested millions in financial, healthcare, and tech companies like Uber, ByteDance, and SoFi through the conglomerate, is Japan’s second-richest person with a net worth of $30.3 billion.

The day after his first tweet, the billionaire investor wrote: “There’s talk of a huge penalty (if the Games are canceled), but if 100,000 people from 200 countries descend on vaccine-laggard Japan and the mutant variant spreads, I think we could lose a lot more: Lives, the burden of subsidies if a state of emergency is called, a fall in gross domestic product, and the public’s patience.”

It’s still unclear just how many people will be at the Tokyo Olympics, where about 11,000 athletes are expected to compete. In March, the Japanese government decided to ban foreign spectators from attending the Games due to the emergence of new COVID-19 variants. As for local fans, the organizing committee has not announced how many spectators will be allowed to attend the Games, though it previously said it was considering capping capacity at 50%. Son did not immediately reply to Insider’s request for clarification on the 100,000 number mentioned in his tweet.

Son’s remarks came after International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates said at an online news conference on Friday that the Games would “absolutely” go ahead even if Japan were under a state of emergency.

protesters hold signs at a demonstration against the tokyo olympics, may 9 2021
A protest against the Olympics on May 9, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. With less than three months remaining until the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, concern continues to linger in Japan over the feasibility of hosting such a huge event during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The SoftBank CEO’s voice joins growing calls to halt the Olympics as Japan struggles to keep its coronavirus outbreak under control. A poll last week found that more than 80% of Japanese residents want the Olympics to be canceled. In the same week, a group of 6,000 Japanese doctors wrote an open letter to Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga saying that Japan’s healthcare system could be overwhelmed if the Games are held as scheduled. Many have taken to the streets to protest the Games going ahead.

The Games, which were already postponed from their original dates in 2020, are set to kick off on July 23. Meanwhile, the government said on Sunday that it’s considering extending the states of emergency in Tokyo, Osaka, and seven other prefectures beyond their original May 31 end date.

Japan recorded 5,041 new coronavirus cases on Saturday and only 2% of its population is fully vaccinated, according to Bloomberg’s Vaccine Tracker.

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