The mind-blowing diets of the world’s best shot-putters are so wild they ‘don’t even like food anymore’

ryan crouser
Ryan Crouser doesn’t always want to eat so much food.

  • Two of the world’s best shot putters, Ryan Crouser and Joe Kovacs, broke down their diets in 2019.
  • Both men eat so much that they don’t even enjoy their food anymore.
  • Those meals include a carton of scrambled eggs, a pound of meat, and 16 oz of milk to wash down meals.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

While some athletes are forced to be very careful about what they put into their bodies and how much of it, the world’s best shot-putters can’t get enough sustenance.

Two of the world’s best shot-putters, Ryan Crouser and Joe Kovacs, divulged details of their diets to The New York Times’ Lindsay Crouse in 2019.

It’s clearly working for both men – they won gold and silver, respectively, in the shot put at the Tokyo Olympics.

Much like NFL linemen who are forced to eat beyond when they’re hungry, the diets of Crouser and Kovacs consist of several heavy meals per day.

“I don’t even like food anymore,” Crouser told Crouse. “Each one of my meals is half of what a normal person eats in a day. And I do that five times. If I ever feel hungry during the day, that means I’m not doing my job.”

Here are some of the details of their wild diets:

  • Each meal is about 1,000 calories.
  • Kovacs eats a carton of scrambled eggs every morning.
  • Dinner includes “no less than a pound of meat, measured after cooking,” according to Crouse.
  • Crouser often eats a whole Domino’s pizza with three meat toppings.
  • Crouser washes down every meal with 16 oz. of milk.
joe kovacs
Joe Kovacs eats a carton of scrambled eggs each morning.

According to Crouse, at track and field events, pre-prepared meals are often designed for runners, the lighter athletes in track and field. That might include half a chicken breast, a quarter cup of rice, and a salad. Crouser and Kovacs said they often have to ask for several of those plates, and then they go out for second or third dinners.

Crouse reported that Crouser’s girlfriend often got mad at him for pushing his food around his plate, prepping himself for another meal.

“Sometimes before another meal, I’ll stare at it for a while, like, ‘This again.'”

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How to watch the Tokyo Olympics – live track and field, basketball, and soccer events continue this week

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Simone Biles
Simone Biles won the bronze medal in the balance beam final at the Tokyo Olympics.

  • The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo began on July 23 and will run through August 8.
  • NBC is providing live coverage of the games on its networks, along with select events on Peacock.
  • Check out our schedule breakdowns for track and field, basketball, soccer, gymnastics, and swimming.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

The Tokyo Olympics held its opening ceremonies on July 23 after a one-year delay, welcoming thousands of athletes from 205 countries and states. The international competition will continue through August 8 with events from 33 different sports.

Live broadcasts and streamed events from Tokyo are available every day on NBC and other NBC affiliate networks. Free highlights and select live events are also available on Peacock, NBC’s streaming service. You can find full channel details and schedules for track and field, gymnastics, swimming, basketball, and soccer events in our individual articles for each sport.

Because the event was originally planned for last year, this year’s Summer Olympics are still being called the Tokyo 2020 Games. Japan hosted the Winter Olympics in 1998, and last hosted the summer games in 1964. New sports at this year’s Olympics include skateboarding, karate, and 3-on-3 basketball.

How to watch the Olympics

megan rapinoe
Megan Rapinoe and the US Women’s Soccer team will no longer be eligible for a gold medal at Tokyo 2020 after suffering losses to Sweden and Canada.

To watch the Olympics you’ll need access to NBC and its affiliated networks. Olympic coverage is spread across multiple NBC channels, including NBC Sports Network, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and USA; Telemundo and Universo carry Spanish language coverage. You can find channel details and schedules for track and field, gymnastics, swimming, basketball, and soccer in our breakdowns for each sport.

If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s various channels, you can use your account information to stream every Olympic event online via the NBC Sports app or the NBCOlympics website. You can also visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule with specific network information for every event.

NBC’s streaming service, Peacock, also features daily highlights, docuseries, commentary, and a limited selection of live events for free. Peacock is available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs.

(Free Plan) (small)

Live TV services with NBC coverage of the Olympics

If you don’t already have a cable or TV provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like YouTube TV, Hulu Live TV, Sling TV, or FuboTV to watch the Olympics live on channels like NBC, NBC Sports, and USA.

Of those options, Sling’s Blue plan is the most affordable at $35 a month ($10 for your first month) for NBC, USA, and NBC Sports. However, to watch all of NBC’s live Olympic coverage on Sling, you’ll need to add the $11 sports package to get access to the Olympic Channel and Golf Channel, as well as the $6 news package for CNBC.

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How to watch the Olympics opening ceremony

The opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics was broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC. If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC, you can stream a replay of the opening ceremony via NBCOlympics.com, the NBC Sports app, or any live TV streaming service with access to NBC.

The opening ceremony is also available to watch on-demand via Peacock, NBC’s standalone streaming service.

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Key dates for the Tokyo Olympics

Katie Ledecky
US swimming star Katie Ledecky won two gold medals and two silver medals at the Tokyo Olympics.

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Simone Biles returns to compete in the Tokyo Olympics tomorrow morning – here’s how to watch the gymnastics finals live

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Simone Biles at Tokyo 2020.
Simone Biles at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

  • The 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition started on July 23 and concludes this Tuesday.
  • The balance beam final featuring Simone Biles and Sunisa Lee can be streamed for free via Peacock.
  • NBC is rebroadcasting portions of its gymnastics coverage during primetime.

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Gymnastics is one of the most popular sports at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The qualification subdivisions started on July 23 and the last gymnastics final is on August 3. Coverage will be rebroadcast during primetime on NBC, and you can stream select events live on Peacock for free.

Women compete on four apparatuses: balance beam, floor exercise, uneven bars, and vault. Men compete on six apparatuses: floor exercise, horizontal bar, parallel bars, pommel horse, rings, and vault.

So far, Team USA has earned two gold medals in women’s gymnastics events. Sunisa Lee won gold for her performance in the individual all-around, and Jade Carey earned the top podium spot during the floor exercise final.

On Monday morning, USA Gymnastics announced on Twitter that Simone Biles and Suni Lee will compete in the women’s balance beam final. You can stream the event live on August 3 at 4 a.m. ET through the Peacock streaming service. The highly anticipated Olympic event will replay that night in primetime at 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET on NBC.

How to watch Olympic gymnastics

Complete coverage of the 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition is available to stream live on the NBCOlympics website or NBC sports app if you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC. Since most of the gymnastics events occur early in the morning, NBC is rebroadcasting select portions during its primetime coverage.

Outside of NBC, Peacock is streaming the gymnastics finals live for free. You can sign up for a free plan at the Peacock website.

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If you’re looking to watch NBC’s primetime coverage without cable, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling’s Blue plan is the most budget-friendly of the bunch at $35/month, and new customers can get their first month for only $10. That said, NBC is only available in select markets, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

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Women’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

Simone Biles
Simone Biles.

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Floor exercise final 9:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Balance beam final 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Balance beam final 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

Men’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

sam mikulak
Sam Mikulak.

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Rings and vault finals 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Parallel and horizontal bar finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Parallel bar final 2:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Horizontal bar final 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch the Tokyo Olympics – live gymnastics, swimming, and basketball events continue this weekend

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Simone Biles
Simone Biles withdrew from the team and individual all-around competitions, but she could still compete in other gymnastics events.

  • The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo will run from July 23 to August 8 after a one-year delay.
  • NBC is providing live coverage of the games on its networks, along with select events on Peacock.
  • Check out our schedule breakdowns for track and field, gymnastics, swimming, basketball, and soccer.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

The Tokyo Olympics held its opening ceremonies on July 23 after a one-year delay, welcoming thousands of athletes from 205 countries and states. The international competition will continue through August 8 with events from 33 different sports.

Live broadcasts and streamed events from Tokyo are available every day on NBC and other NBC affiliate networks. Free highlights and select live events are also available on Peacock, NBC’s streaming service. You can find full channel details and schedules for upcoming track and field, gymnastics, swimming, basketball, and soccer events in our individual articles for each sport.

Because the event was originally planned for last year, this year’s Summer Olympics are still being called the Tokyo 2020 Games. Japan hosted the Winter Olympics in 1998, and last hosted the summer games in 1964.

How to watch the Olympics

megan rapinoe
Megan Rapinoe and the US Women’s Soccer team defeated Japan to win the gold medal at the 2012 Olympics.

To watch the Olympics you’ll need access to NBC and its affiliated networks. Olympic coverage is spread across multiple NBC channels, including NBC Sports Network, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and USA; Telemundo and Universo carry Spanish language coverage. You can find channel details and schedules for track and field, gymnastics, swimming, basketball, and soccer in our breakdowns for each sport.

If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s various channels, you can use your account information to stream every Olympic event online via the NBC Sports app or the NBCOlympics website. You can also visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule with specific network information for every event.

NBC’s streaming service, Peacock, also features daily highlights, docuseries, commentary, and a limited selection of live events for free. Peacock is available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs.

(Free Plan) (small)

Live TV services with NBC coverage of the Olympics

If you don’t already have a cable or TV provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like YouTube TV, Hulu Live TV, Sling TV, or FuboTV to watch the Olympics live on channels like NBC, NBC Sports, and USA.

Of those options, Sling’s Blue plan is the most affordable at $35 a month ($10 for your first month) for NBC, USA, and NBC Sports. However, to watch all of NBC’s live Olympic coverage on Sling, you’ll need to add the $11 sports package to get access to the Olympic Channel and Golf Channel, as well as the $6 news package for CNBC.

TV (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)

How to watch the Olympics opening ceremony

The opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics was broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC. If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC, you can stream a replay of the opening ceremony via NBCOlympics.com, the NBC Sports app, or any live TV streaming service with access to NBC.

The opening ceremony is also available to watch on-demand via Peacock, NBC’s standalone streaming service.

Premium (Monthly Plan) (small)

Key dates for the Tokyo Olympics

Katie Ledecky
US swimming star Katie Ledecky goes into the Tokyo Games with five Olympic gold medals.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Simone Biles deserves all the praise for prioritizing her mental health. And it’s a good reminder that many Americans can’t afford to take time off when they need it.

Simone Biles looks on during the Tokyo Olympics.
Simone Biles at the Tokyo Games.

  • Simone Biles was rightly praised for prioritizing her mental health during the Olympics.
  • But most people can’t afford to take time off work when their mental health is suffering.
  • Calls for self care mean little if we don’t make systemic changes to reduce economic stressors.
  • Nicole Froio is a freelance journalist and researcher. She writes about pop culture, feminism, queerness, violence against women, digital cultures and much more.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

This week, four-time Olympic champion Simone Biles withdrew from the 2020 Olympic Games to care for her mental health. After a wobbly vault run where Biles risked serious injury, the athlete admitted that the high stakes of the Olympics felt like too much, and the stress was affecting her performance.

“I have to do what’s right for me and focus on my mental health and not jeopardize my health and my wellbeing,” Biles said. “We’re not just athletes, we’re people at the end of the day, and sometimes you just have to step back.”‚Äč

At 24, Biles made the difficult decision to quit and prioritize her own wellbeing over the possibility of winning gold – and the expectations of millions of fans. Her supporters rightfully note the amount of pressure Biles has been under, praising her wisdom to drop out before she hurt herself.

And Biles and her supporters are right: Quitting when your work is harming you takes courage and is an immense burden to parse out. The fact Biles was able to understand her own limitations and communicate her boundaries to the world in such a high-pressure competition is no small feat, and she should be commended for it.

Many people have taken this moment to call on others to also take stock of their mental health and take a rest when they need it. Those of us who have struggled with mental illness for most of our lives are all too familiar with this phenomenon: There’s a cycle of mental health affirmations that circulate on social media everytime a famous person opens up about their mental struggles.

The problem is that these affirmations don’t actually reflect a society where mental self care is truly taken seriously. Particularly after a pandemic where many of us experienced death and trauma, but were barely granted time away from work to process a global disaster, the gap between “it’s okay not to be okay” and actual mental health provisions at work feels enormous.

Everyone should have the right to quit or take paid time off to care for their own wellbeing. But the reality is that many of us can’t afford to take time off or quit, as much as we know our mental health is suffering. It’s a fantasy to keep repeating that mental health is important and we must care for it, without actually looking at the crushing pressures of capitalism and how they manifest in the workplace. The constant grind of working for food and shelter doesn’t allow most workers to take time off for self care and rest.

I can’t afford to pause for my mental wellbeing

By far, one of the hardest parts of being mentally ill is dealing with work stressors and financial responsibilities. I have been semi-public about my struggles with generalized anxiety disorder and depression for almost a decade, and I was recently diagnosed with PTSD. As part of my treatment plan, I’m being encouraged to slow down the pace of my working life, but quitting isn’t simply a matter of choice.

As a freelance journalist, I have to follow the news cycle to make money and be able to pay rent and bills. I wish I could simply drop everything and take extended time off. But I can’t afford to spend a whole month unpaid, nor do I feel like I can risk editors forgetting that I’m available to be commissioned by being on hiatus.

Plus, treating any mental illness is expensive. Though I’d love to only focus on becoming mentally well rather than working, I also need to make enough money to pay for my mental health treatment out of pocket. In addition to paying for food and rent, I also need to pay for my medication, my psychiatrist, and my therapist.

It’s a never ending cycle: I should slow down to take care of myself, but to take care of myself, I need to make money, so I exhaust myself to make money and be able to pay for treatment. The odds are against me, but my situation can illuminate what we should be focusing on when we talk about mental health and wellbeing. There needs to be efforts to care for our mental health that go beyond the rhetorical.

We need systemic changes to truly prioritize mental health

A good place to start would be raising the minimum wage and decreasing job insecurity. A recent study determined that a mere $1 increase in minimum hourly wage can decrease suicide rates. Job insecurity is directly related to higher rates of anxiety and somatic symptoms, so creating jobs where people feel secure is essential to caring for people’s mental health.

Prioritizing mental health has to be a concrete possibility for everyone, even when their wages are high and they have a secure job. This means that employers, institutions, and governments have to prioritize mental health over productivity and profit, rather than sending out memos and social media posts with empty platitudes about taking care of our mental health. Paid time off without consequences and a good healthcare plan are basic mental health provisions any employer should be giving their employees.

Biles is right: Everyone should have the right to quit harmful situations that are detrimental to their mental health. But no matter how many infographics I see on Instagram that tell me my mental health is the most important thing in my life, the rhetorical affirmation that I deserve to be well won’t change my current material inability to slow down and get the treatment I deserve. We need concrete ways to care for ourselves and our minds, and that requires major structural changes in our places of work and in how we make our money.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Texas deputy attorney general caught some heat after calling US Olympian Simone Biles a ‘selfish, childish national embarrassment’

Simone Biles.
  • A Texas prosecutor criticized Simone Biles after she withdrew from two Olympic events in Tokyo.
  • The remarks drew backlash, with one person saying Biles has “ten times the integrity than you do.”
  • Deputy Attorney General Aaron Reitz apologized for speaking without full knowledge of the situation.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Texas attorney general caught some heat Wednesday after calling US Olympian Simone Biles a “selfish, childish national embarrassment” for withdrawing from two events at the Tokyo Olympics.

The Olympic gold medalist announced her withdrawal from women’s gymnastics team final at the Tokyo Games earlier this week, citing mental health concerns.

Some people drew comparisons between Biles’ exit and US gymnast Kerri Strug, who helped her team win gold in the 1996 Olympic Games despite having a broken ankle, showing what could happen when athletes push themselves too far.

Writer Chris Buskirk tweeted a video of Strug’s performance in 1996, saying she had “amazing grit” and that “the great ones find a way.”

Aaron Reitz, a deputy attorney general in Texas, reshared Buskirk’s tweet, with the caption: “Contrast this with our selfish, childish national embarrassment, Simone Biles.”

The now-deleted post drew criticism, and one Twitter user responded to Reitz, saying Biles has “ten times the integrity than you do.”

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said in a statement he “learned about a very inappropriate and insensitive tweet by one of our employees” and that the matter “will be handled internally.”

“I know Simone Biles – she is a fantastic athlete but an even better person,” Paxton said in the statement. “Mental health is far more important than any athletic competition and I fully support her decision.”

Following the statement from the Office of the Texas Attorney General, Reitz later tweeted saying his “personal social media comments do not represent Attorney General Paxton or the Office of the Attorney General.”

“In a moment of frustration and disappointment, I opined on subjects for which I am not adequately versed,” Reitz said in a statement posted later Wednesday. “That was an error. I can’t imagine what Simone Biles has gone through.”

“Simone Biles is a true patriot and one of the greatest gymnasts of our time,” he added. “I apologize to her, and wish her well.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Michelle Obama and Sen. Mitt Romney praise Simone Biles after she pulled out of Olympics event: ‘We are rooting for you’

simone biles
Simone Biles of Team United States blows a kiss whilst watching the Men’s All-Around Final on day five of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Gymnastics Centre on July 28, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan.

  • Several politicians praised Simone Biles after she pulled out of an Olympics event.
  • “I love and admire Simone Biles and our Olympians,” Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah tweeted.
  • Biles withdrew from the team competition, citing mental health concerns.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Several public figures and politicians threw their support behind US gymnastics champion Simone Biles after she decided to pull out from a team Olympics event on Tuesday.

Former First Lady Michelle Obama tagged Biles in a tweet on Tuesday evening and wrote: “Am I good enough? Yes, I am. The mantra I practice daily.”

“We are proud of you and we are rooting for you,” she added.

GOP Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah similarly commended the superstar gymnast, writing in a tweet: “I love and admire Simone Biles and our Olympians.”

“Beyond their determination and sacrifice, they evidence the greatness of the human spirit, in victory and in defeat,” he continued. “I take pride in them, not so much for the medals they win as for the grace, humanity & character of their hearts.”

Biles sent shockwaves through the Olympic Games on Tuesday when she unexpectedly withdrew from Team USA’s group competition in Tokyo, Japan, after she scored low marks on her opening vault routine. USA went on to earn silver in the women’s gymnastics team final.

The 24-year-old athlete later revealed that she dropped out due to mental health concerns.

“I have to put my pride aside. I have to do what’s right for me and focus on my mental health and not jeopardize my health and well-being,” she told reporters. “That’s why I decided to take a step back.”

Biles also cited the stress of the global sporting competition and the pressure to perform well for others as reasons for her exit. She announced on Wednesday that she will also not participate in the individual all-around final at the Olympics, set to take place Thursday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi acknowledged the move in a press briefing on Wednesday.

“God bless our athletes. We admire them for their skill, and their discipline, and their focus, and their talent,” the top Democrat said. “And we admire them as athletes, but we admire them as people for having the strength to walk away from all that.”

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Biles’ withdrawal “courageous” and congratulated the rest of the women’s gymnastics team on Twitter on Tuesday evening.

Other members of Congress also tipped their hat to Biles for pulling out of the competition.

Rep. Lori Trahan of Massachusetts described her as an “American icon” and “inspiration to young women across the world.”

“She’s also human, and her decision to put her mental health first is once again setting an incredible example for all of us,” Trahan added. “We’ve got your back, Simone.”

Rep. Ritchie Torres of New York tweeted that Biles’ “decision to put her mental health first is a testament to her character, bravery & will help #EndTheStigma” around mental health.

“We stand with her & congratulate the USA gymnastics team on bringing home the silver,” he said.

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The US Olympic team’s logo only has 13 stars for a simple legal and logistical reason

Simone Biles, Olympic Logo

Amid all the patriotic cheers for Team USA Olympians in Rio, some have questioned the patriotic accuracy of the logo for the U.S. Olympic Team. Specifically, many people are wondering why the logo only has 13 stars.

The comments in social media circles have ranged from simple curious ity to snark (e.g. “Hey Team USA, it has been a while since we had just 13 states!”)

Well, it turns out there is a simple logistical, and legal, reason for the logo.

When designing the logo back in 2010, it was determined that in many uses of the logo (clothes, caps, merchandise, etc.), the flag would be so small that it would be impossible to make it look good with 50 stars, that aesthetically, it would look like a mess.

“We use the 13-star, which is an official American flag, on our logo because of sizing,” Lisa Baird, the USOC’s chief marketing officer recently told the Chicago Tribune.

Many people have also been wondering, if Team USA is going to use a 13-star flag, why not use the Betsy Ross flag with the stars in a circle?

There is a simple reason for that also – the flag shown in the Team USA logo is still a legal flag of the United States of America.

While not as famous as the Betsy Ross flag, the flag with the stars in the 3-2-3-2-3 pattern was actually the first official flag of the U.S. beginning in 1777, according to USHistory.org. It was used until 1795 when two stars were added for Vermont and Kentucky.

But what is important to note is that even as stars are added to the flag, older versions remain official U.S. flags and can still be used in accordance with the U.S. flag code. Kevin Keim, co-author of “A Grand Old Flag: A History of the United States Through its Flags,” explained to the Chicago Tribune.

“One can fly a 13-star flag and it still deserves the same respect that people would give to the American flag with 50 stars,” Keim said.

So there it is. Team USA is using a legal U.S. flag, one that is simply easier to use in small form than one with 50 stars.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Katie Ledecky will swim for gold at the 2021 Olympic Games – here’s how to watch the event on NBC

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Katie Ledecky
Olympic swimming events will be broadcast live on NBC and USA.

  • Tokyo Olympic swimming events started on July 24 and conclude July 31.
  • Swimming events will air on NBC and USA Network via live TV streaming services.
  • On the USA team, expectations are high for Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyTV (small)

Swimming events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics started on July 24 and continue daily until July 31. Live coverage will be broadcast on NBC and the USA network.

The USA team has several strong competitors in women’s and men’s divisions, but all eyes will be on Katie Ledecky when she gets in the water. Ledecky already has an impressive collection of five gold medals and one silver medal coming into the Tokyo Olympics. If she snags three more gold medals in Tokyo, Ledecky will tie swimming legend, Jenny Thompson, as the winningest female US Olympian of all time.

In the men’s division, Caeleb Dressel is expected to lead the pack after his impressive showing at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Dressel earned two gold medals during the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

During the first three days of swimming events, the USA team earned three gold medals. In an unexpected victory, 17-year-old Alaskan Lydia Jacoby took home the gold medal for her performance in the women’s 100m breaststroke. For the men’s swimming division, Americans earned a top podium spot in the 400m individual medley and the 4x100m freestyle relay.

Katie Ledecky posted the fastest qualifying times in 200m and 1500m freestyle, the Chicago Sun-Times reports. On July 27, the women’s finals for both events will air live during prime time coverage on NBC.

How to watch Olympic swimming

Live broadcasts of Olympic swimming events are split between two channels: USA and NBC. For both men’s and women’s events, you can watch the preliminary heats on USA and the finals on NBC. Swimming heats will air in the mornings starting around 6 a.m. ET, and final races will air later in the evening during primetime coverage.

If you already have access to NBC and USA through a pay-TV provider, you can also stream every swimming event live via the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com.

If you don’t have cable, you can get NBC and USA through a variety of live TV streaming services. Sling TV is the cheapest subscription service for watching all the Olympic swimming events. New members can get their first month for just $10 (regularly $35). NBC is only offered in select markets, however, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, and YouTube TV are additional live streaming services with access to both channels for watching Olympic swimming, but these options are more expensive at $65/month each.

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Viewers who can’t tune into events live can stay caught up on the action by catching highlights and primetime coverage on NBC. For free swimming highlights and videos from additional Olympic events, you can download the Peacock app or visit NBCOlympics.com.

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Men’s Olympic swimming schedule

Caeleb Dresse stands during Olympic trials in 2021.
Caeleb Dressel.

July 27

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:17 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Heats) 7:37 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 9:49 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:21 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:26 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
200m Backstroke (Heats) 6:25 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:15 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:04 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 10:37 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 11:08 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:16 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:50 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:11 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC

Women’s Olympic swimming schedule

Katie Ledecky at the 2021 Olympic Trials
Katie Ledecky.

July 27

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:57 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:52 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:34 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:53 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 10:28 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:31 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
800m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Heats) 7:08 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:24 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:36 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:46 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:32 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC
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How to watch gymnastics at the Tokyo Olympics – the finals are free to stream on Peacock

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Simone Biles.
Simone Biles at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

  • The 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition started on July 23 and concludes on August 3.
  • Select events featuring Team USA can be streamed for free via Peacock.
  • NBC is rebroadcasting portions of its gymnastics coverage during primetime.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky(Free Plan) (small)

Gymnastics are one of the most anticipated events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The qualification subdivisions started on July 23 and the last gymnastics final is on August 3. Coverage will be rebroadcast during primetime on NBC, and you can stream select events live on Peacock for free.

Women will compete on four apparatuses: balance beam, floor exercise, uneven bars, and vault. Men will compete on six apparatuses: floor exercise, horizontal bar, parallel bars, pommel horse, rings, and vault.

Simone Biles is looking to repeat her successful performance at the 2016 Rio Olympics where she won four gold medals and one bronze medal. If the Olympic favorite earns gold again in the all-around, she will become the first female athlete with back-to-back wins in that event since 1968.

Team USA earned a spot in the women’s team final, although the Russian Olympic Committee received a higher score during the qualification event. On July 27, the women’s team final will air live at 6:45 a.m. ET on Peacock. The highly anticipated Olympic event will replay that night in primetime at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

How to watch Olympic gymnastics

Complete coverage of the 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition is available to stream live on the NBCOlympics website or NBC sports app if you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC. Since most of the gymnastics events occur early in the morning, NBC is rebroadcasting select portions during their primetime coverage.

Outside of NBC, Peacock is streaming all of the gymnastics finals live for free. You can sign up for a free plan at the Peacock website.

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If you’re looking to watch NBC’s primetime coverage without cable, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling’s Blue plan is the most budget-friendly of the bunch at $35/month, and new customers can get their first month for only $10. That said, NBC is only available in select markets, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)

Women’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

Simone Biles
Simone Biles.

July 27

Event Time Where to watch
Team Final 6:45 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Team Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 29

Event Time Where to watch
All-Around Final 6:50 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

All-Around Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 1

Event Time Where to watch
Vault and Uneven Bars Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Vault and Uneven Bars Finals 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Floor Exercise Final 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Floor Exercise Final 9:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Balance Beam Final 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Balance Beam Final (Rebroadcast) 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET NBC

Men’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

sam mikulak
Sam Mikulak.

July 26

Event Time Where to watch
Team Final 6 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Team Final 8:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 28

Event Time Where to watch
All-Around Final 6:15 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

All-Around Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 1

Event Time Where to watch
Floor Exercise and Pommel Horse Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Floor Exercise and Pommel Horse Finals 4:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Rings and Vault Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Rings and Vault Finals 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Parallel and Horizontal Bar Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Parallel Bar Final 2:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Horizontal Bar Final 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
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