This California company makes smart, off-the-grid, and ‘healthy’ prefab homes for to $670,000 – see inside and how they work

A home from Dvele.4
A home from Dvele.

  • Dvele builds smart self-sustaining prefab homes that use AI to create a healthy home environment.
  • The “software-defined” homes use DveleIQ and 300 sensors to monitor itself and its occupants.
  • Dvele’s lineup includes both homes over 3,000 square-feet and tiny homes for $150,000 to $670,000.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

California-based Dvele is creating smart prefab homes with integrated artificial intelligence programs to make the homes healthier to live in.

While prefabricated homes aren’t a new concept, they’ve often been considered the future solution for our increasingly inaccessible housing market. As a result, several prefab home makers have seen an increase in public interest, especially during the coronavirus pandemic.

This includes Dvele, a technology-forward prefab home maker with a focus on improving both human and planet health.

Dvele’s lineup of home models combine several major topics that have since popped up during COVID-19, specifically home buying, prefab homes, and health. Keep scrolling to see how:

Prefabrication allows Dvele to produce its homes regardless of the weather conditions, all within four to six months.

Dvele's homes under construction.84
Dvele’s homes under construction.

Once the homes are ready, they can be shipped to its final destination and set in place using a crane.

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Dvele’s homes under construction.

According to Matt Howland, Dvele’s president, smart prefab homes are “absolutely” the future.

The Elsinore model.4
The Elsinore model.

“Can you imagine an iPhone being built in normal construction conditions?” Howland told Insider in an email interview. “To achieve a self-powered, intelligent home, factory production is the way to go.”

Dvele's homes under construction.88
Dvele’s homes under construction

Like many prefab home builders, Dvele saw a boost in business during COVID-19.

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom.
A home from Dvele.

However, Howland attributes this more to the nature of Dvele’s “healthy” homes (more on this in a bit) than the prefab aspect.

A home from Dvele. 34
A home from Dvele.

Dvele emphasizes a mid-century modern design with an open floor plan throughout its homes.

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A home from Dvele.

Peeking around inside, the units all look similar to that of any traditionally built home.

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A home from Dvele.

Aspects like the large windows, sliding doors, entertainment areas, custom cabinets, and modern utilities make its prefab nature almost unidentifiable.

A home from Dvele. 43
A home from Dvele.

The homes all have robust air quality, water filtration, and energy saving systems.

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A home from Dvele.

The homes can also be customized, and customers can pick from one of Dvele’s six different exterior finishes.

A home from Dvele.10
A home from Dvele.

Most of Dvele’s clients slightly customize their homes to fulfill their “dream home and lifestyle,” according to Howland.

A home from Dvele.12
A home from Dvele.

Dvele has 13 models of varying sizes, but it’s Elsinore model is its most popular.

The Elsinore model's  2
The Elsinore model.

Elsinore has been a hit with the customers due to its design, open floor plan, and “popular bedroom and bathroom mix,” Howland told Insider.

The Elsinore model's front entry.
The Elsinore model’s front entry.

The $640,000 Elsinore home is 2,940 square-feet with four bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms.

The Elsinore model.2
The Elsinore model.

The popular home has an open kitchen, dining, and living room layout. There are also separate laundry and powder rooms.

The Elsinore model's kitchen.
The Elsinore model’s kitchen.

The kitchen looks like any normal cooking area with its cabinets, pantry, stovetop, dishwasher, oven, and refrigerator.

The Elsinore model's kitchen. 2
The Elsinore model’s kitchen.

Moving on, the living room has its own cabinets, an optional electric fireplace, and sliding doors that lead occupants out to the patio.

The Elsinore model's living room.
The Elsinore model’s living room.

The primary bedroom then has its own bathroom and a walk-in closet with wardrobes …

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom.
A home from Dvele.

… while the other two bedrooms share a bathroom.

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom's bathroom. 2
The Elsinore model’s primary bedroom’s bathroom.

The fourth bedroom – which can function as a guest room – has its own restroom.

The Elsinore model's guest bedroom.
The Elsinore model’s guest bedroom.

The full bathrooms all have the typical necessities, including wall-mounted toilets, showers, and vanities.

A home from Dvele. 227
A home from Dvele.

Other models in Dvele’s arsenal include the 3,523 square-foot Trinity. This option, the company’s largest offering, starts at $670,000 and includes four bedroom and 3.5 bathroom.

A home from Dvele.6
A home from Dvele.

Tiny home enthusiasts can also find their fit with the company’s three 419 square-foot tiny homes ranging from $150,000 to $180,000.

The Emerald Mini Home from Dvele.2
The Emerald Mini Home from Dvele.

No matter the model, all Dvele homes are built with DveleIQ, the company’s proprietary “whole home solution” that integrates artificial intelligence “from the foundation up” to make a home’s interior environment healthier.

A home from Dvele. 24
A home from Dvele.

“While DveleIQ facilitates the normal convenience features of smart home tech, it also provides an intelligent system that will enhance the health of the occupant, the home’s energy efficiency, and even the durability of the home,” Howland wrote.

A home from Dvele. 39
A home from Dvele.

Smart homes aren’t just about lights that turn on and off automatically.

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A home from Dvele.

To Dvele, a smart home is a home that creates a healthy environment while learning to become become more efficient overtime.

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A home from Dvele.

The “software-defined” homes use over 300 sensors and DveleIQ to monitor different aspects of the home, from mold to carbon dioxide.

A home from Dvele.9
A home from Dvele.

The home can then look into the reasons of any issues that have popped up.

The Elsinore model.
The Elsinore model.

For example, when the humidity level falls under a certain point, the home’s system will check for potential causes, such as open doors and the number of people in the home.

A home from Dvele. 28
A home from Dvele.

Another example: if the system notices potential water or mold damage, it will let the homeowners know, and can notify Dvele for any possible solutions.

A home from Dvele.4
A home from Dvele.

However, the units still have all the typical “smart home” features.

A home from Dvele. 31
A home from Dvele.

For example, the home can monitor its occupant’s schedule and preferred thermostat settings to set the interior temperature before the homeowner arrives back from an outing, preventing the thermostat from working even when the home is empty.

A home from Dvele.5
A home from Dvele.

To monitor its occupants, the home can use tools like smart phones and “energy consumption patterns,” according to Howland.

A home from Dvele. 44
A home from Dvele.

“Our homes are constantly learning about their occupants and adapting to them as they start to understand a user’s interaction with the home, anticipate their needs, and facilitate them through the home’s systems,” Howland wrote.

A home from Dvele. 47
A home from Dvele.

Dvele currently has a growing list of about 100 “intelligence home automations” that include detecting maintenance problems and helping its occupants relax at the end of the day, according to Howland.

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A home from Dvele.

“The goal of DveleIQ was to build a software-defined home that could sense in real time the state of the home and react accordingly,” Howland wrote. “Because of this, every Dvele home is continually getting better, like how software updates to a Tesla make it continually better.”

A home from Dvele.1
A home from Dvele.

According to Howland, the public has received DveleIQ well, especially as more people have begun understanding that a “smart home” isn’t just automatic lights and temperature settings.

A home from Dvele. 32
A home from Dvele.

Beyond technological innovations for healthier homes, Dvele also excels in the sustainability space.

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A home from Dvele.

Dvele is able to decrease its waste output because its homes are prefabricated with different models that use several of the same materials.

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A home from Dvele.

With the help of DveleIQ, the homes are also designed to be planet friendly by incorporating aspects like solar power, insulation, and efficient hot water heaters.

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A home from Dvele.

Keeping in line with the company’s green forward mission, Dvele plants 10,000 trees for every home built, and uses “sustainable material sourcing.”

A home from Dvele. 21
A home from Dvele.

Like other sustainable prefab home makers, Dvele aims for passive house certifications.

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A home from Dvele.

The homes are also all self-powered, taking away any reliance on larger power grids.

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A home from Dvele.

This is possible with a Dvele home’s insulation, energy efficient amenities, and solar power use.

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A home from Dvele.

A Dvele home’s solar panel output changes per location and home type. As of now, most of the company’s units are based in California, according to Howland.

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A home from Dvele.

The prefab units also have backup battery and energy storage systems just in case.

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A home from Dvele.

Are you an EV owner? No worry. A Dvele home’s systems have enough energy to charge an electric vehicle.

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A home from Dvele.

“DveleIQ and our ‘Self-Powered’ initiative were both very well received by the market and we saw an uptick in owners looking for quality healthy homes,” Howland wrote. “Our sales and interest have continued to exceed our boldest expectations, it’s been awesome to see how our core tenets are resonating with prospective owners.”

A home from Dvele. 215
A home from Dvele.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Washington company is creating $5,000 prefab tiny homes that can be setup in 30 minutes to help solve the homelessness crisis – see how it works

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

  • Pallet is building tiny homes for people who have lost their homes due to natural and personal disasters.
  • Like other tiny home makers, Pallet saw an uptick in popularity last year.
  • The tiny homes can be installed close to each other to create a community of Pallet units.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Expensive tiny homes have been in high demand since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. But on the opposite end of the spectrum, a tiny home maker specializing in personal units for the homeless has also seen a surge in interest.

Pallet, a social purpose company, creates shelters for people facing homelessness as a result of natural and personal disasters. These personal tiny homes can be set up in multiples to create small communities, allowing occupants to have safety and privacy away from larger community shelter buildings.

“What we felt was really missing from the housing spectrum was a dignified shelter option that honored their individuality and allowed them to have autonomy in their rehabilitation process,” Amy King, founder and CEO of Pallet, told Insider. 

Read more: How a formerly homeless sneakerhead with just $40 to his name built a multi-million dollar resale empire in 6 years

The company’s main customer base is municipalities, although it’s received orders from nonprofits, religious organizations, and people who own plots of land.

According to King, while the tiny home community concept has been present for some time now, it’s definitely become more of a trend as of late. 

Like other tiny home makers, Pallet first started seeing an uptick in interest in March 2020. However, when early October hit, municipalities started realizing they would need individual shelters for people without homes during COVID-19-plagued wintertime.

This realization then created a second wave of Pallet interest in the same year.

The units were initially designed to serve as shelters for people who had lost their homes due to natural disasters, such as fires.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

However, the company started opening its scope of potential occupants when homelessness began reaching a similar “disaster emergency level,” according to King.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Fresno, California.

Despite the potential to capitalize off of the tiny home boom, Pallet currently does not sell any of its units to one-off costumers looking for a backyard tiny home.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

“Right now, we are heavily focused on the humanitarian crisis in front of us,” King said. “We will not stop until homelessness has ended in this country, so that’s where we’re focusing our attention for the time being.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

Last year, Pallet built over 1,500 new beds across the US. There are now Pallets in states like California, Minnesota, Texas, and Hawaii.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Source: Pallet

It took Pallet five or six different iterations before it settled on this final design.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Pallet offers two shelter sizes: the 64-square-foot Pallet 64, and the 100-square-foot Pallet 100. Prices start at $4,900 and $7,000, respectively.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Fresno, California.

The sleeping cabins consist of an aluminum frame and fiber-reinforced plastic composite walls.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

These walls are insulated, but the home also comes with a heater and an air conditioner.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Like any home, the shelters are equipped with safety elements like a lockable door, a smoke detector, and a carbon monoxide monitor.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

The shelters can accommodate up to four beds with a folding bunk bed system, although the beds can optionally be replaced with desks.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

In terms of storage, the tiny home has shelves and room for under-bed storage.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

The structure can withstand up to 100 mile-per-hour winds and manage up to 25 pounds per square-foot of snow.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

If that’s not enough, Pallet also has an “extreme weather” version originally developed for a Hood River, Oregon location.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

However, none of the homes have bathrooms. This was intentional: the company wants its units to serve as “temporary stabilizing shelters” while its occupants wait for a more permanent option.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Also, plumbing is expensive and more difficult to maintain, which would have driven the tiny home’s price up.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

With that being said, Pallet is currently prototyping a bathroom and has previously trialed a community room. Looking forward, Pallet might test a kitchen facility as well.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

The units have a lifespan of more than 10 years, but many people only reside in these tiny homes for months at a time.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

The units are also easy to clean and sanitize in between occupants, which is key given the homelessness emergency during the COVID-19 pandemic.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Unlike permanent “congregate” shelter options that could take years to build, Pallet’s prefabricated tiny homes can be setup in under 30 minutes, and a full village can be created within 10 days.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

This allows Pallet to quickly and inexpensively address the homelessness crisis in the US.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

While Pallet specializes in making individual shelters, the company recognizes the need for community shelters as well.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

“Unfortunately, the homelessness crisis in this country has escalated to a point that we need all products,” King said. “Each person needs something different, and we need to have a diversified opportunity for people to get their needs met.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Homelessness isn’t the only issue Pallet is tackling.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

The Washington-based company’s “social purpose” title means it serves as a combination between a for-profit and a non-profit organization.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

As a result, profits made are put back into the company’s two main missions: stopping “unsheltered homelessness,” and creating a “nontraditional workforce.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

To the latter point, 90% of Pallet’s employees have once faced addiction, incarceration, or homelessness.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

Pallet offers these employees workforce and “life skills” training, which includes teaching them how to start a bank account or get an ID.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

Source: Pallet

“If we didn’t have them, I don’t think we’d be nearly [as successful],” King said. “They’re not just workers for us, they’re helping lead the concept here.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A New York company has created a wildly popular $21,000 DIY cabin that can be built in 3 days

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

  • Den Outdoors unveiled a $21,000 do-it-yourself A-frame Cabin kit that can be assembled in three days with the help of two or three people.
  • The A-frame Cabin kit targets three segments that have experienced a shake-up during COVID-19 times: DIY-ers, remote and tiny living, and tourism.
  • The interior can fit up to two people and the structure is only semi-permanent, which means it can be taken apart and moved as needed.
  • The kit and Den Outdoors have received so much interest, the company is now contemplating raising a seed round “because the business continues to grow despite our lack of resources,” Den founder Mike Romanowicz told Business Insider in an email interview.
  • According to Den, the kit is a good option for companies in the glamping and hospitality business, and for people looking to list properties on Airbnb.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Den Outdoors unveiled a do-it-yourself A-frame Cabin kit that can be assembled in three days.

Unlike most cabin and tiny home makers that sell fully built units, New York-based Den Outdoors takes the approach of selling both construction plans and do-it-yourself kits with all of the necessary parts. In line with these two product types, the A-frame cabin’s plans can be purchased for $99, and the full DIY kit starts at $21,000.

Read more: The top 5 do-it-yourself home renovations to maximize your property value, from the dean of a top-ranked interior design program

According to Den founder Mike Romanowicz in an email interview with Business Insider, the company and its cabin kit has seen a “huge swell of traffic and interested customers.”

“What’s propelling the product’s popularity is that we’ve launched something that has exactly the right characteristics that people want,” Romanowicz wrote in the email interview with Business Insider. “It’s beautiful, fast to build, and accessibly priced relative to other options in the market.”

Keep scrolling to see inside the wildly hyped A-frame cabin:

Read more: Here’s the pitch deck this New York startup used to raise $15 million to expand the services it offers its community of 17 million do-it-yourselfers

The A-frame Cabin kit comes in three finishes: a black Forest, grey Alpine, and cream Coast.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Den Outdoors

The back of the cabin has a large floor-to-ceiling double-pane glass window for a flood of natural light.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The 115-square foot cabin is 12 feet tall with 11-foot ceilings …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… and has room for two people with a king bed or two twin beds.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame can remain both on or off-grid, and has insulated floors and windows, making it four-seasons friendly.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

It’s no surprise the A-frame kit has become so popular given trends that have appeared during COVID-19.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The product capitalizes on two movements that have exploded during the coronavirus pandemic: tiny and remote living, and do-it-yourself projects.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame cabin fits perfectly in the tiny home segment boom that both rental companies and makers have been seeing during the coronavirus pandemic, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Wall Street Journal

According to Romanowicz, people have been looking for spaces that are near the outdoors, whether that be in the form of a tiny home, “normal” sized home, or cabin.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“People are moving from cities to residential areas, and folks still in cities are seeking vacation homes for extra space and a place to go retreat from urban living,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Similarly, people started seeking do-it-yourself projects – especially home renovations – while stuck at home due to COVID-19-related lockdowns.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to Romanowicz, people have been seeking “self reliance” during the COVID-19 pandemic, whether it be through baking bread or completing do-it-yourself projects.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to a blog published in July by market and consumer analysis company Netbase Quid, DIY-related trends are seeing an “explosive growth” with a yearly 4% growth rate.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Netbase Quid

To target this segment, Den decided to make the kit easy to successfully assemble.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

These new living trends, coupled with the rise in DIY-ers, created the perfect storm for Den Outdoors and its cabin kit.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The company was officially launched this past July. Since then, Den has already seen explosive growth “partially aided by the tailwinds that COVID-19 is providing,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The company now has about 24,400 followers on Instagram, over 10,000 customers in its email database, and has seen sales increasing monthly from organic growth alone.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“To date, we’ve been self-funded, but we’re now heavily considering raising a seed round because the business continues to grow despite our lack of resources,” Romanowicz wrote. “The path to scalable growth and profitability lies clearly ahead.”

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The do-it-yourself kit also touches upon another segment impacted by COVID-19: tourism.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den’s cabin kit targets more than the private customer who wants a backyard cabin.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The kit can also be used by glamping property owners or those interested in renting the space out for Airbnb use.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

In fact, the kit was in part designed for the hospitality industry as the cabin can be listed with high nightly rates …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… but can be set up quickly and inexpensively, making it a good investment, according to its maker.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Because the cabin is four seasons-approved, it can withstand the wintertime when revenue for glamping and camping-related businesses is generally lower due to non-insulated tents.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Like a tent, the cabin can be easily assembled and disassembled and is portable.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

However, the A-frame is more durable than a canvas tent, which is a glamping structure that many companies have started using, according to Den.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“Because of all that, a lot of our interest has come from larger platforms in the camping and glamping industry, as well as from a number of different hotel and hospitality operators and developers who are looking to fix their seasonality problem while offering beautiful accommodations to their guests,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The full A-frame is also small enough to be placed without a permit.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The cabin is similar to a shed in that a permanent concrete foundation is not necessary …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… although Den recommends placing the cabin on concrete pavers or deck blocks.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The cabin can also be used as more than just a glamping outpost or a backyard escape.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame can also serve as a place to work out, or as a separate office room.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to the company, several people have already purchased the kit to use as a backyard office.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The kits are now being designed and produced in New York with the goal of providing “revenue, jobs, and stability” during the coronavirus pandemic, according to Den’s press question-and-answer sheet.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“We were fortunate enough to partner with an incredibly talented local team with the right skills and tooling to enable us to build this with thoughtful craftsmanship, precision componentry, and in a cost-effective way to enable us to get to a competitive price,” the company explained.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den is considering unveiling more kits in the future, but as of now, it’s focused on A-frame order fulfillments.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den Outdoors will begin shipping out the A-frame kits next year.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Read the original article on Business Insider

More than half of Americans said they would consider living in a tiny home in a new survey as the lifestyle increases in popularity amid the pandemic

Natura one-bedroom tiny home
The Tiny Housing Co’s one-bedroom Natura tiny home.

  • Tiny homes have become popular during the coronavirus pandemic, and with this sudden surge comes new tiny home trends.
  • IPX1031, a Fidelity National Financial subsidiary, surveyed 2,006 Americans to measure the public interest in tiny housing.
  • Over half of the respondents reported that they would consider living in a tiny home, and of those who are not yet homeowners, 86% said they would consider purchasing a tiny home as their first home.
  • Of those surveyed, 72% said they would consider using a tiny home as an investment property. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tiny homes have become undeniably popular during the coronavirus pandemic, and with this sudden surge comes new tiny home trends.

According to a survey by Fidelity National Financial subsidiary IPX1031, 56% of the 2,006 American respondents reported they would consider living in a tiny home.

Of those surveyed who are not yet homeowners, 86% said they would contemplate purchasing a tiny home as their first home and 84% of those surveyed said they would consider a tiny home as a retirement living option.

Read more: California’s housing crisis is so dire, a startup just raised $3.5 million in VC funding to drop tiny houses in people’s backyards

Affordability, efficiency, eco-friendliness, and minimalism were cited, in that order, as the four most attractive factors that the tiny home lifestyle has to offer. 

It’s no surprise the economical aspects of tiny living was listed by 65% of those surveyed as the most enticing factor of tiny living. The median price of a tiny home falls within the $30,000 to $60,000 range, while the median price of a traditional home sits at $233,400, according to IPX1031. As a result, 79% of survey respondents reported being able to afford the median price of a tiny home, while only 53% said the same for a traditional home.

Aspects like mobility and privacy fell lower on the list of attractive factors, although 54% of survey respondents said they would want a mobile home, and a home under 400 square feet.

The rental trend 

Dark Horse tiny home
The Dark Horse tiny home.

This uptick in tiny home popularity can be attributed to more than just those looking for a permanent downsize. Tiny homes have also become a popular target for tourists looking for an escape during COVID-19, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal, and tiny homemakers have now started targeting customers who want tiny units to rent out or to list on Airbnb.

As a result, 72% of respondents said they would consider using a tiny home as an investment property, with 63% of those people reporting they would use it as a long term rental unit at an average monthly rent of $900. In contrast, 37% said they would rather rent their tiny home for short term stays on platforms like Airbnb and Vrbo with an average nightly rate of $145.

According to the report’s analysis of 1,300 tiny home-related Google search keywords, tiny homes are currently the most popular in the northwest and northeast of the US.

IPX1031 conducted the survey, which was made up of 55% female and 45% male, between November 1 and 5. The median age of those surveyed was 38, and the majority of people surveyed had an income under $80,000, with 37% of respondents making under $40,000, and 46% making between $40,000 to 80,000. 

Read the original article on Business Insider