A 3D-printed concrete tiny home is now on Airbnb – see what it’s like to stay inside the $130 per-night stay

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

  • Take a tour of the Fibonacci House, a 3D-printed concrete tiny home that’s now available on Airbnb.
  • The home was designed, created, and sold by a Dutch company, Twente Additive Manufacturing.
  • The Fibonacci House is Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D printed concrete tiny home.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Vacationers have been flocking to Airbnb’s “unique stays,” and searches for these unconventional rentals have jumped 94% in 2021 compared to the same time in 2019, according to Airbnb.

the exterior side view of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, a new one-of-a-kind unique stay is available for summertime vacationers to rent: the Fibonacci House …

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

… Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D-printed concrete tiny home, according to a press release from Twente Additive Manufacturing (TAM).

a wall of the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

Twente Additive Manufacturing is a Dutch construction technology group that specializes in, of course, 3D-printed concrete homes.

The Fibonacci House under on-site construction
The Fibonacci House.

Like other 3D-printed concrete homes, the sound and weatherproof Fibonacci House has distinctly curved walls.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

If the home’s name sounds familiar, that’s because its design and name pay homage to the Fibonacci Sequence – or the golden ratio – hence its curved appearance.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

The home was designed to use “the least number of straight lines in the design as possible,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House was printed over 11 days in 20 parts using a 3D concrete printer.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

These components were first printed off-site before being assembled at its current woodsy Canadian location, Lynne Myers reported for Designboom.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Designboom

The Airbnb now sits in the Kootenay Lake Village at the waterfront Procter Point community.

the Fibonacci House in a wooded area
The Fibonacci House.

Besides 3D printing, the spiral concrete home also capitalizes on another big real estate trend: tiny homes.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In this case, tiny means 376.7 square feet.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

This space – which follows a curved, spiraling floor plan – fits a living room, kitchen, bathroom, patio, and sleeping loft.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The bathroom is located in the middle of the curved floor plan, and its shower tops off the center of the spiral.

the Fibonacci House's shower
The Fibonacci House.

The room also has a toilet, sink, and enough storage to accommodate items like towels, according to images on the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's bathroom
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, moving on to the bedroom. The sleeping loft can be accessed using the ladder, according to the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen and ladder
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

If you’ve never slept in a loft before, don’t be too concerned about the height.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The side of the bed closest to the ledge is guarded by a mesh net.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In total, this area can sleep two adults and two children.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

Moving along, the window-lined kitchen and living room are at the base of the ladder.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Taking a closer look, the kitchen has amenities like a dual induction cooktop, a coffee maker, and cabinets.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen
The Fibonacci House.

Now, let’s head outside to the last part of this tour, the covered patio.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Don’t want to cook in the kitchen? You’re in luck. The outdoor space has a barbecue and view of a park and the nearby Kootenay Lake.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Almost all of the home’s elements that aren’t based in concrete are made up of sustainably sourced wood from a nearby community forest.

the bathroom of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The revenue from the Airbnb listing will be donated to World Housing, a home building charity that’s currently looking to construct a community of affordable 3D printed homes for single mothers in Canada.

The exterior of the Fibonacci House with a tree
The Fibonacci House.

The community – currently called “Sakura Place” – will have five three-bedroom homes that will form the appearance of a flower.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Like other companies that specialize in a 3D printing construction method, World Housing believes 3D concrete printing can address two aspects of the housing crisis: the labor and housing shortage.

a close up of the Fibonacci Houses windows
The Fibonacci House.

Similarly, TAM believes that home construction needs to pivot to decreasing building material use and energy consumption while “rewiring … how people think about the process of designing buildings,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

“In addition to affordable homes, the market increasingly demands innovative housing concepts,” Yasin Torunoglu, the housing and spatial development alderman at the municipality of Eindhoven, said in a press release regarding another 3D printed concrete home, this time in the Netherlands.

the Fibonacci House under construction with a crane lifting part of the home
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

“With the 3D printed home, we’re now setting the tone for the future: the rapid realization of affordable homes with control over the shape of your own house,” Torunoglu continued.

the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

A night’s stay at the Fibonacci House ranges from around $127 to $132 per night – not including the cleaning or service fee – depending on the days booked.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

But if you’re currently planning a last-minute trip, don’t go running to the Fibonacci House listing.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House is already fully booked for the reminder of July and almost half of August.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Worldwide phenomenon’ prefab tiny home maker Nestron just started shipping overseas – see inside its $77,000 units

the exterior of the Cube Two at night, lit up
The Cube Two.

  • Singapore-based Nestron is now shipping its prefab tiny home Cube One and Two models to the UK.
  • The company expects to sell over 100 units in the UK by the end of 2021 following massive online interest.
  • Take a look inside the two AI-powered models with smart furniture.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Interest in prefab tiny homes skyrocketed during COVID-19.

the exterior of the Cube One
The Cube One.

Now, one Singapore-based company is looking to capitalize on this trend by introducing its artificial intelligence-powered tiny homes to the UK.

the exterior of the Cube Two at night, lit up
The Cube Two.

Meet Nestron, the brains behind several wildly popular tiny homes that have since become a “worldwide phenomenon,” Choco Toh of Nestron’s marketing team told Insider in December.

the white panels of the Cube One while its being manufactured
Paneling the Cube One.

Source: Insider

Its tiny homes were such a hit, Nestron’s website crashed for a while, likely due to an influx in webpage visits and “extremely overwhelming” popularity, Toh said.

Cube Two's large windows
The interior of the Cube Two.

Source: Insider

To expand its reach, Nestron is now in the process of preparing its debut in Northampton, UK, a little over 65 miles from London.

the steel frame of the Cube One
Cube One’s structure.

Toh says Nestron will close about 10 deals before the homes actually debut in Europe …

the interior of the Cube One with a bathroom, living room, and kitchen
The interior of the Cube One.

… but estimates that by the end of the year, it’ll sell over 100 units in the UK.

the exterior of the Cube Two
The Cube Two.

“We believe with the increase in marketing activities upon our debut, there are nearly 100,000 potential users in the UK, which will bring explosive and continuous growth to our local distributors,” Toh told Insider in an email statement.

Cube Two's bedroom
The interior of the Cube Two.

Like other companies that ship products internationally, Nestron has struggled to move its tiny homes in the face of jammed ports and shipping delays.

The tiny home wrapped in fabric being picked up by a crane
The models being shipped.

But before we dive into how the company is overcoming these issues, let’s take a look at the two futuristic tiny homes that will debut in the UK: the $34,000 to $52,000 Cube One and the $59,000 to $77,000 Cube Two.

the exterior of the Cube Two at night, lit up
The Cube Two.

These prices vary widely due to a list of possible extra add-ons, such as solar panels, heated floors, and additional smart appliances.

Cube Two's bedroom
The interior of the Cube Two.

The Cube One is more popular with solo occupants, while the larger Cube Two has been a hit with families, couples, and as a backyard unit.

Cube Two's dining table
The interior of the Cube Two.

Nestron debuted both units well before its UK plans but has since made sizing changes ahead of its overseas delivery: the Cube One’s size was boosted about 16.2 square-feet, while the Cube Two was expanded by about 25 square-feet.

The tiny homes wrapped in fabric on a truck
The models being shipped.

Let’s take a closer look at the Cube One, which stands at about 156 square feet.

the interior of the Cube One with a bathroom, living room, and kitchen
The interior of the Cube One.

This square footage holds the living room, bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen space (which comes with cabinets, a sink, and a stovetop, according to renderings of the unit).

the interior of the Cube One with storage units
The interior of the Cube One.

Like any typical home, the living room has a dining table and sofa, while the bedroom has a side table, closet, and of course, a bed.

the interior of the Cube One with storage units and a bed
The interior of the Cube One.

Moving towards the bathroom, the tiny Cube One comes with a shower, towel rack, and sink, all in one enclosed space.

the interior of the Cube One with a bathroom, living room, and kitchen
The interior of the Cube One.

The little living unit also has built-in necessary amenities like lights, storage units, electric blinds, and a speaker.

the interior of the Cube One with a bathroom, living room, and kitchen
The interior of the Cube One.

There’s even room for a modern-day must-have: air conditioning units.

the interior of the Cube One with storage units
The interior of the Cube One.

Now, let’s take a look at the larger Cube Two, which can accommodate three to four people with its two beds, both of which sit on opposite ends of the tiny home.

Cube Two's countertop and windows
The interior of the Cube Two.

Like its smaller sibling, the almost 280-square-foot Cube Two has a living room, two beds, a kitchen, and a bathroom, all with the same furnishings as the Cube One.

a peek down Cube Two's hallway with the kitchen and windows
The interior of the Cube Two.

However, the dining table in the Cube Two is noticeably larger, and there’s a skylight for added natural light and stargazing.

Cube Two's dining table and countertop
The interior of the Cube Two.

Both models come insulated and have smart home capabilities using Nestron’s “Canny,” an artificial intelligence system.

Cube Two's kitchen and skylight
The interior of the Cube Two.

Canny can complete tasks like brewing your morning coffee or automatically adjusting your seat heights.

Cube Two's dining table
The interior of the Cube Two.

Everything is “smart” these days, which means the Cube One and Two can also come with motion-sensing lights and smart mirrors and toilets.

Cube Two's kitchen and skylight
The interior of the Cube Two.

You might be wondering how Nestron plans to move its Cube One and Two tiny homes overseas in one piece. Well, let’s move on to everyone’s favorite topic: logistics, and how the company managed to ship its tiny homes despite global delays.

the steel frame of the Cube Two
Cube Two’s structure.

According to Toh, Nestron has had a “solid foundation built in the industry … allowing it to have a good relationship with experienced and professional forwarding partners.”

a worker insulating the tiny home
A worker applying the insulation layer.

Despite this foundation, like other companies, Nestron has experienced delays related to the global supply chain jam, specifically congested ports in the UK.

the wiring and plumbing inside the bare tiny home under construction
The wiring and plumbing systems.

As a result, the company’s forwarding charges were tripled what it initially expected, according to Toh.

the white panels and windows of the Cube Two while its being manufactured
Paneling the Cube Two.

But instead of charging its clients extra money for immediate shipping, Nestron decided it would pause shipping until costs were lowered.

the white panels of the Cube One while its being manufactured
Paneling the Cube One.

To bypass these congestion issues, Nestron also decided to reroute its original plan to ship straight to the UK.

the wiring and plumbing inside the bare tiny home under construction
The wiring and plumbing systems.

“In the end, [we] decided to travel over to Antwerp, Belgium, and then land in the UK,” Toh said. “This way, by the time we reach the UK port, the congestion would’ve been clear.”

the tiny home under construction with white panels
One of the tiny homes under construction.

Despite this detour, shipping costs were still higher than expected, in part because the company and its distributors still wanted to make the debut timeline.

a person connecting the water and sewage points
The water and sewage connection points.

“Since the demands are growing and people want to experience touch and feel with Nestron, we took the chance and sent the units off earlier this month, expecting them to arrive late July [or] early August,” Toh said.

Cube Two's windows and tables
The interior of the Cube Two.

To aid in the transportation process, the tiny homes have built-in retractable hooks to help make it compatible with cranes.

The tiny home wrapped in fabric being picked up by a crane
The models being shipped.

The homes’ structures are also stable enough to withstand the stress of moving, according to Toh.

the steel frame of the Cube Two
Cube Two’s structure.

And all the little living units are also packaged in waterproof fabric to both avoid rusting and to allow for easy inspection.

A completed Cube One in the factory.
A completed Cube One in the factory.

Being in the UK will allow potential consumers to “engage with Nestron units directly,” Toh said. “The experience will definitely influence the market interest and purchase power.”

two tiny homes on a truck for a road test
The tiny homes on a road test.

Read the original article on Business Insider

These $26,000 California-inspired DIY tiny home kits made of hemp are sold out for the rest of the year

the inside living space of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

  • Coexist is creating tiny home and office DIY kits that include all the necessary construction materials.
  • This includes sustainable hemp-based insulation.
  • The “Traveler” kits start at $26,000 and are sold out for the rest of this year.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
A Pennsylvania-based company is creating do-it-yourself kits that turn sustainable construction materials into 140-square-foot tiny homes and offices.

The exterior of the Coexist Traveler build among trees and outdoor seating
The exterior of the Traveler.

Let’s take a closer look at the Traveler DIY kit, which was first launched on Earth Day in April.

The design of the home – which starts at $26,000 – was inspired by the co-founders’ times in California.

the inside living space of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

Coexist was co-founded by Anastasiya Konopitskaya and Drew Oberholtzer, a wife-and-husband team. 

Traveler has a midcentury modern Scandinavian appeal with a design that “merges the indoor and outdoor,” according to Konopitskaya, a licensed architect. This was done by integrating a 12-foot-wide glass-paneled wall with a sliding door and mesh screen.

But if that’s not enough, extra windows can be added in.

 

In total, the home can fit three queen beds, accommodating up to six people throughout its first floor and loft, which is accessible using a ladder.

the inside of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

There’s also room for a half bathroom, couch, coffee table, and more, depending on the customers’ needs.

The loft can also either come with a solid plywood or netted floor, which evokes the image of a hammock, according to its maker.

Even the exterior of the kit home is customizable.

The exterior of the Coexist Traveler build among trees and outdoor seating
The exterior of the Traveler.

Customers can pick between three facades: a “sandy beach” cedar, a plaster and hemp combination, or a recyclable corrugated metal.

The unit stands at 19-feet deep, 14-feet long, and 15-feet tall.

the inside of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

But if that’s too small, several Travelers can be combined into a larger compound.

Now, let’s dive into what makes the Traveler stand out from other kit homes: sustainability.

The hempcrete
The hempcrete.

This includes the wooden pegs and mortise and tenon, both of which are built by a nearby craftsperson.

The company also sources the timber framing’s wood from a local sustainable forest, which allows Coexist to bypass some of the pricing complications other homebuilders and DIY-ers have seen throughout COVID-19, Konopitskaya said.

The team tries to source most of the materials from its home state in Pennsylvania, but due to supply chain bottlenecks in the hemp industry, the raw hemp needed for the homes’ insulation still has to be imported from Europe, mostly France.

It’s 2021. Why not sow some cannabis seeds and reap some home insulation.

blocks of hempcrete
The hempcrete.

The Traveler uses hemp-based insulation for a greener living environment and customers can select between three hemp options: “hemp blanket batt” insulation, precast “hempcrete block” infill, or both.

Hempcrete blocks can maintain interior temperatures, among other uses, and are made of the plant’s woody core, a limestone-based binder, and water. They’re also biodegradable, lightweight, and have no carbon footprint, according to Coexist.

The hemp blanket batt is made of 92% hemp fiber (the remaining 8% is a binder) and is “superior to all insulations on the market because of its high density and thermal mass properties,” according to its maker.

The inspiration for creating a hemp-based home came when the couple was still living in Los Angeles.

blocks of hempcrete
The hempcrete.

“We started building guest and single-family houses in Los Angeles and we were looking for materials that perform well that are also healthy and good for the environment,” Oberholtzer said. “We really couldn’t find anything,” 

Then, the couple found hempcrete.

blocks of hempcrete
The hempcrete.

“We went down the rabbit hole trying to learn everything we could about it,” Oberholtzer continued.

That’s when the couple decided to move from California to Pennsylvania, where they bought a small research farm to produce a “seed-to-structure where we could create proof of concepts,” Oberholtzer said.

blocks of hempcrete
The hempcrete.

The farm also grows other products, including flax, and has already received research grants from the state’s department of agriculture. It’s also working with Thomas Jefferson University to create 3D printed hemp bioplastic home products to create a local “hemp farmer-to-end use” supply chain with carbon sequestering capabilities.

Coexist also designed the Traveler to be a healthy unit to live in.

The exterior of the Coexist Traveler build among trees and outdoor seating
The exterior of the Traveler.

Part of the home is compostable, and none of the wood or hemp materials have been chemically treated, according to its brochure. This means no formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, or latex paint throughout the home.

Coexist is even in the “early stages of trying to apply carbon credit” to the Traveler, according to Oberholtzer.

So why tiny homes and offices? Well according to Oberholtzer, the idea for the product came out of COVID-19-induced demand.

the lofted bedroom of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

The couple has two children at home and experienced the same parenting and work-life balance difficulties that have been all too familiar for many parents during COVID-19.

This then led the couple to look into the cabin and tiny home markets, where they found that there was nothing hemp-based “that’s really focused on health, wellness, and performance,” Oberholtzer said.

The exterior of the Coexist Traveler build among trees and outdoor seating
The exterior of the Traveler.

That’s when Traveler was born, inspired by the working parents’ drive to create their own “well-performing and healthy” DIY kit using their area of expertise in hempcrete.

At first, the couple thought more people would use the Traveler DIY kit as a backyard office since that was the original plan for the build.

the inside of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

But after its market debut, the team realized most of its customers wanted it for uses other than an office, whether it be a backyard home or a family compound.

Unlike other tiny homes that ship prefabricated or almost fully built, the Traveler comes as a DIY kit, construction materials included.

the inside living space of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

This allows savvy customers looking for a construction project to build their own unit. And all it takes is one week, some power tools, and at least two people.

Despite the extra customer effort of a DIY unit, interest in the Traveler has been skyrocketing, and the response has been “pretty crazy,” Oberholtzer said

The exterior of the Coexist Traveler build among trees and outdoor seating
The exterior of the Traveler.

Tiny homes have skyrocketed in popularity during COVID-19, and the Traveler is no exception: the kits are now sold out for the remainder of the year.

At first, Coexist was only selling five units per season. But now, the company is taking unlimited pre-orders for the spring 2022 season. It’s already seen hundreds of inquiries, including some that want to create entire communities out of Travelers.

“We had to pivot a bit because we weren’t anticipating the response, Oberholtzer said. “It’s been great, but we need to do some things to be able to fulfill potentially 50 or 100 [orders], so that’s going to require a little preparation for the spring.”

the inside living space of the Coexist Traveler build
The interior of the Traveler.

All of these inquiries have also given the team ideas on how to improve the Traveler. Some customer suggestions have included releasing a bigger build or a build with a kitchenette or full bathroom.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LA’s first prefab tiny home village for the homeless opened this year as a ‘test case’ for the city – see how it’s doing now

Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

  • Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission’s Chandler Street Tiny Home Village first opened in February.
  • The village was created to temporarily house North Hollywood’s unhoused residents.
  • See how the Los Angeles’ first tiny home community is doing now, and how it’s inspired similar developments.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
In February, an unassuming and “forgotten” corner of North Hollywood, Los Angeles, was transformed into a colorful village of tiny homes run by nonprofit Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission.

Chandler Boulevard Bridge Home Village
The Chandler Boulevard Bridge Home Village.

Source: Insider

City officials first scouted the teardrop-shaped infill lot when they were looking for a place to build “bridge” homes, or shelters meant to aid in finding unhoused residents a permanent home.

IMG_0869
The entrance to the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village

Now, 43 residents call the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village their (temporary) home, just a few months after the community’s February grand opening.

IMG_0827
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Lehrer Architects, which designed the tiny home community with the city’s Bureau of Engineering, had a $3.49 million budget for the project. But foundational work – including street leveling and sewer lines – became the most expensive component of the project.

IMG_0846
The laundry facility at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Despite this cost, the beta project’s shelters “add real value” to the once vacant lot, according to Lehrer Architects.

IMG_0868
The entrance to the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Lehrer Architects

Chandler Village was the first tiny home community Hope of the Valley had planned for Los Angeles.

IMG_0766
The bed inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

It’s since served as a “test case” for the city, Rowan Vansleve, CFO of Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission, told Insider.

IMG_0784
A tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The nonprofit has already opened its second tiny home village, pictured below, about two miles away from the initial community, riding off of the success of the Chandler site.

IMG_0917
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

The new site, the Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village, is much larger than the original “test case” Chandler site pictured below. It’ll have 200 beds, a significant uptick from Chandler’s 75 beds

IMG_0851
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

“They had taken another piece of unused land that had encampments on it and they used the learnings of that to build [the new Alexandria Park village],” Vansleve said.

IMG_0877
A peek through the fence into the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

By starting with the Chandler site, the nonprofit learned that the village’s bright colors worked well, but that any upcoming villages would need more on-site offices for case managers.

IMG_0850
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

These learnings were then applied to the new Alexandria site, and will dictate how the nonprofit’s future tiny home villages will look.

IMG_0878
The entrance into the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

This includes upcoming communities in the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles, which will be open in the next two months.

IMG_0824
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

But now, let’s take a closer look at the first tiny home village that started it all.

IMG_0822
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

In April, I took a tour of the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village, which has 40 tiny homes and 75 beds.

IMG_0780
The window of a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Hope of the Valley

After being temperature checked by a guard at the entrance of the community, I walked past a series of lockers into the fenced village.

IMG_0880
The entrance into the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The lockers are meant to secure the residents’ items that aren’t allowed inside of the village, whether it be drugs or personal defense weapons, Vansleve told me while we toured the Alexandria Park location.

IMG_0879
The entrance into the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

An outdoor smoking area and the restroom facilities with showers sit right across from the entrance.

IMG_0795
The smoking area at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

From there, I turned the corner and was immediately greeted by the line-up of tiny homes, an outdoor seating area, and shipping container-like buildings.

IMG_0866
Outdoor communal areas at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village

The shipping container-like buildings make up the communal facilities, which include a laundry room. It’s also where the case workers are located.

IMG_0857
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The village also offers its residents three meals a day here.

IMG_0839
A cup at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The outdoor communal tables are located right next to these facilities and in front of the small dog park, which sits at the center of the village.

IMG_0810
The dog park at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Surrounding these public amenities are the tiny homes.

IMG_0863
The outdoor tables and a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Several of these tiny homes have already been personalized with flowers, flags, and posters.

IMG_0817
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Each tiny home has an entry door that can be locked, a luxury some of the residents might not have had prior.

IMG_0787
The lock on the door of a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“Achieving this level of privacy and security is not possible in a traditional shelter,” Michael Lehrer and Nerin Kadribegovic, Lehrer Architects’ founding partner and partner, respectively, told Insider in an email interview in February. “The evocation of a child’s drawing of a ‘house’ and even Monopoly’s homes reinforces the idea of ‘home.'”

IMG_0768
The bed inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The interior has all of the basic amenities needed to live in a tiny home in Los Angeles, including a bed, a heater …

IMG_0761
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

… an air conditioning unit, windows, shelves, and a desk.

IMG_0769
The air conditioning unit inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The units were all created by Washington-based Pallet, which specializes in creating prefab tiny homes that can be quickly assembled to create homes for people who may have been unhoused due to natural or personal disasters.

IMG_0786
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“What we felt was really missing from the housing spectrum was a dignified shelter option that honored their individuality and allowed them to have autonomy in their rehabilitation process,” Amy King, founder and CEO of Pallet, told Insider in January.

IMG_0855
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

Parts of the community, including some of the tiny homes, have been painted bright reds, yellows, and blues to keep the village feeling colorful and non-“institutional,” according to Vansleve.

IMG_0792
The smoking area of the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

However, it wasn’t the community’s bright colors that caught my attention. It was the people.

IMG_0867
Two people at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The village’s residents were friendlier than my own neighbors: almost every person I walked by smiled and said “hello.”

IMG_0872
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

And before I left, I had a chat with someone in the village who told me about their daughter, son in college, and interest in other cultures.

IMG_0774
A desk and chair inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The conversation reminded me of something Vansleve told me during our chat at the new Alexandria Park location: “I look at people on the street [in their late 60s, early 70s] and some of them could be my mum. They’ve experienced incredible amounts of trauma and they’re left on the street. I think it’s a moral issue.”

IMG_0844
Communal areas at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Think of Chandler Street Tiny Home Village as a transitioning place for its residents.

IMG_0864
A tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The goal of the village, and Hope of the Valley’s upcoming sites, is to provide its residents with stability and a temporary home while helping them eventually transition into more permanent housing.

IMG_0765
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

When a new resident arrives, the community’s employees, which include case workers, will help the new individual with a list of personal needs.

IMG_0865
The Pallet logo on a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“Here it’s more supportive, more in-depth,” Priscilla Rodriguez, a case manager at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village, told Insider. “When somebody comes in, they could be at the very beginning.”

IMG_0871
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

From there, case workers will help the residents receive necessary paperwork like an ID, a social security card, or a birth certificate.

IMG_0847
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The team will also help its residents find income. This could be unemployment benefits at first, but will hopefully lead to a job or Supplemental Security Income.

IMG_0858
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The case workers even help with life skills, which could include teaching them how to keep their tiny homes clean or encouraging them to bathe everyday.

IMG_0804
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Workers will also connect the residents to doctors and physicians for both mental and physical healthcare.

IMG_0837
The laundry facility at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“Some of them wanted to bring their tents into their home because they’re not used to coming out of that setting and transitioning back into permanent housing,” Rodriguez said.

IMG_0812
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

This is the “transition” case workers like Rodriguez are trying to help with.

IMG_0853
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“They are going to be housed on their own one day, and we want to help support them in every way so that way when they get there, they feel confident to be there and to keep that house on their own,” Rodriguez said.

IMG_0771
A window inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The program lasts for 90 days, but can be extended for an additional 90 days if they find the resident is making good headway and improvements, and is “actively working” with the case managers to meet goals.

IMG_0800
The outdoor tables and tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“All we need from them is just to connect with us,” Rodriguez said. “Just tell us what you need.”

IMG_0815
The dog park at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Every resident in this current batch has already received an extension because the village and program is so new. But moving forward, the goal is for residents to meet the 90-day timeline.

IMG_0807
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Each resident gets to dictate the pace at which they move, and right now, many of them are showing “tremendous progress.”

IMG_0823
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The majority of the 43 residents currently being housed at the Chandler site are on track to be housed independently, which is the ultimate goal of the program.

IMG_0859
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“We really are showing that the program is working,” Rodriguez said.

IMG_0825
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

In order to qualify for a bed at the village, an outreach worker, often from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, has to verify that the potential resident is homeless and resides within a few miles of the village.

IMG_0781
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The Chandler site has been so popular there’s already a waitlist for the beds.

IMG_0821
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The team will accept anyone into the village, even if they have substance abuse or mental health issues, physical disabilities, or legal problems.

IMG_0805
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“We’re just people who were trying to help these participants better their life,” Rodriguez said. “They’re not trying to harm the community in any way, they’re trying to get themselves back into that community.”

IMG_0806
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

And despite the ongoing pandemic, the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village hasn’t had any COVID-19 outbreaks.

IMG_0860
Communal areas at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The tiny homes each typically shelter up to two people, but due to the virus, only couples are allowed to share a unit.

IMG_0816
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

And every one to two weeks, the village offers COVID-19 testing on-site.

IMG_0819
The fence and a sign at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Several residents have already received their first round of vaccines as well.

IMG_0778
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Many of the residents have also been complying with face mask wearing, social distancing, and sanitizing protocols, according to Rodriguez.

IMG_0826
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Despite the work Chandler Street is doing for the homeless community, the program has experienced some protests and hecklers.

IMG_0828
Tiny homes and outdoor tables at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The hecklers “just want to cause a scene saying we’ve got drug addicts and criminals in here,” according to Rodriguez.

IMG_0832
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“It’s sad to see the pushback because any one of us could be here at any point,” Rodriguez said. “You never know what it’s gonna take to make you homeless, especially during a covid year.”

IMG_0830
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Despite this, the village and its program has so far been a success, and has already attracted international attention.

IMG_0809
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

As a “test case” for future tiny home communities, and since most residents are on track to be permanently housed, the concept has served as an inspiration for people around the world.

IMG_0835
Communal areas at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The Chandler site has even seen out-of-country visitors who have been interested in incorporating a similar idea in their own city or state.

IMG_0790
A tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“It’s making a big impact,” Rodriguez said. “They see that we have had a lot of success with this program, so I definitely see it expanding … hopefully all over the country and in other nations as well.”

IMG_0773
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Read the original article on Business Insider

See inside the prefab tiny homes LA is building to combat the city’s homelessness crisis

IMG_0920
A peek inside one of the tiny homes.

  • This year, Hope of the Valley opened two prefab tiny home villages to house Los Angeles’ unhoused residents.
  • The nonprofit plans to open two more communities in Los Angeles this year.
  • Take a look inside the prefab tiny homes, which were made by Washington-based Pallet.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Los Angeles’ homelessness crisis has been quietly brewing for several years now.

IMG_0871
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

To address this issue, nonprofit Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission has opened two colorful tiny home villages in the city this year: Chandler Street and the newer Alexandria Park.

IMG_0992
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The villages aren’t meant to house millennial tourists or trendy minimalists interested in tiny living.

IMG_0937
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

Instead, the two communities were built to temporarily house Los Angeles’ unhoused residents.

IMG_0872
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

This serves as an alternative to “congregate” shelters that can often be more expensive and less time-efficient to construct.

IMG_0830
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The goal of Hope of the Valley’s tiny house program is to help its residents find a permanent home by the end of their stay.

IMG_0867
Two people at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The program starts at 90 days with the option to extend for an additional three months depending on the progress of the resident, Priscilla Rodriguez, a caseworker at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village, told Insider.

IMG_0850
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The two villages are about two miles away from each other and were opened only two months apart.

IMG_0905
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The first tiny home village on Chandler Blvd. (pictured below), opened in February as a “test case” for Los Angeles, Rowan Vansleve, CFO of Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission, told Insider.

IMG_0805
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The North Hollywood-based community has 40 tiny homes and 75 beds, but as of now, only couples are allowed to share a unit due to COVID-19 protocols.

IMG_0827
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

So far, the program has been a success, according to Rodriguez.

IMG_0824
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The village’s on-site caseworkers help the residents with a variety of tasks, from obtaining a social security card, to finding income, to teaching them life skills, such as how to keep their tiny homes clean.

IMG_0804
The tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“Some people come here and they’re used to being in a tent and not having their own space,” Rodriguez said. “They’re going to be housed one day on their own, and we want to support them in every way so when they get there, they feel confident to be there and to keep that house on their own.”

IMG_0855
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Many of the residents at this first site have already made “huge progress,” and the majority of the community’s 43 occupants are already on track to be housed independently, according to Rodriguez.

IMG_0864
A tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Now, Hope of the Valley is looking to continue this success with its latest tiny home community just a short drive away from the original Chandler site.

IMG_0917
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The new Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village is the largest tiny home community in California, according to the nonprofit.

IMG_0954
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The new site, which is also located in North Hollywood, is over double the size of the original Chandler location with 103 tiny homes and 200 beds.

IMG_0953
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The new community will begin welcoming its first round of residents this week.

IMG_0955
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

The Alexandria Park and Chandler Street sites are both filled with 64-square-foot shelters made by Washington-based Pallet, which specializes in building tiny homes for people who have been unhoused due to natural or personal disasters.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Source: Insider

The company also makes 100-square-foot units, but let’s take a look inside the smaller iteration that’s being used by Hope of the Valley.

IMG_0920
A peek inside one of the tiny homes.

The cabins have an aluminum frame with insulated, fiber-reinforced plastic composite walls.

IMG_0761
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

Like any typical home, the shelters have a lockable entry door.

IMG_0787
The lock on the door of a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

A locking door may seem like a no-brainer for most people, but many of the communities’ residents may not have previously had this security measure.

IMG_0780
The window of a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

This sense of privacy and security isn’t possible in a “traditional” congregate shelter, Michael Lehrer and Nerin Kadribegovic, Lehrer Architects’ founding partner and partner, respectively, told Insider in an email interview in February. Lehrer Architects designed the Chandler site with the Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering.

IMG_0786
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

“Ethically and morally for people who’ve experienced trauma, having a locking door can sometimes become the difference between accepting help getting off the street and making a step towards permanent supportive housing,” Rowan Vansleve, CFO of Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission, told Insider.

IMG_0765
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

A 64-square-foot space may seem small, but it has enough room to accommodate all of the unit’s amenities, which include temperature controls like an air conditioner and heater …

IMG_0926
The inside of one of the tiny homes.

… lights that can be used when the four windows don’t provide enough natural brightness …

IMG_0924
The inside of one of the tiny homes.

… and outlets.

IMG_0772
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The beds are topped with a navy blue duvet, which is meant to invoke a calm feeling, according to Vansleve.

IMG_0766
The bed inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

There’s also a small desk, a smoke detector for an added layer of security …

IMG_0776
The smoke detector inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

… and storage space underneath the bed frames.

IMG_0778
Inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The new Alexandria Park tiny homes also come with toiletries bags customized for men and women.

IMG_0935
The inside of one of the tiny homes.

Several of the new shelters’ furnishings are sourced from Hope of the Valley’s five donation and thrift shops located throughout the greater Los Angeles region.

IMG_0921
The inside of one of the tiny homes.

Several residents who have been living at the Chandler location have already made themselves at home with plants, posters, and artwork.

IMG_0822
Tiny homes at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

The tiny homes either come with one or two beds, and some of the single-bed units have enough space to accommodate a wheelchair.

IMG_0901
The interior of the wheelchair accessible tiny home.

The shelters don’t have room for a private restroom, but both communities have shared individual bathrooms that each come with a sink, toilet, and shower.

IMG_0978
Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village’s bathroom.

Same goes for laundry, which can be done at the sites’ communal laundry facilities.

IMG_0846
The laundry facility at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Pallet’s shelters typically have a lifespan of over 10 years, and the units can be easily disassembled and reassembled, according to Pallet.

IMG_0771
A window inside a tiny home at the Chandler Street Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

The Pallet homes located in Alexandria Park can be assembled within 90 minutes.

IMG_0903
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

A 64-square-foot Pallet shelter starts at $4,900.

IMG_0902
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

Source: Insider

But external costs such as sewage, electricity, and internet bumped the cost of each bed at the Alexandria Park location up to about $43,000.

IMG_0992
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

“It doesn’t feel like a homeless shelter, it feels like a launching pad,” Vansleve said about the Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village. “As you walk through, it almost has a college dorm sort of vibe to it, which is exciting.”

IMG_0940
The Alexandria Park Tiny Home Village.

Read the original article on Business Insider

This California company makes smart, off-the-grid, and ‘healthy’ prefab homes for to $670,000 – see inside and how they work

A home from Dvele.4
A home from Dvele.

  • Dvele builds smart self-sustaining prefab homes that use AI to create a healthy home environment.
  • The “software-defined” homes use DveleIQ and 300 sensors to monitor itself and its occupants.
  • Dvele’s lineup includes both homes over 3,000 square-feet and tiny homes for $150,000 to $670,000.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

California-based Dvele is creating smart prefab homes with integrated artificial intelligence programs to make the homes healthier to live in.

While prefabricated homes aren’t a new concept, they’ve often been considered the future solution for our increasingly inaccessible housing market. As a result, several prefab home makers have seen an increase in public interest, especially during the coronavirus pandemic.

This includes Dvele, a technology-forward prefab home maker with a focus on improving both human and planet health.

Dvele’s lineup of home models combine several major topics that have since popped up during COVID-19, specifically home buying, prefab homes, and health. Keep scrolling to see how:

Prefabrication allows Dvele to produce its homes regardless of the weather conditions, all within four to six months.

Dvele's homes under construction.84
Dvele’s homes under construction.

Once the homes are ready, they can be shipped to its final destination and set in place using a crane.

Dvele's homes under construction.98
Dvele’s homes under construction.

According to Matt Howland, Dvele’s president, smart prefab homes are “absolutely” the future.

The Elsinore model.4
The Elsinore model.

“Can you imagine an iPhone being built in normal construction conditions?” Howland told Insider in an email interview. “To achieve a self-powered, intelligent home, factory production is the way to go.”

Dvele's homes under construction.88
Dvele’s homes under construction

Like many prefab home builders, Dvele saw a boost in business during COVID-19.

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom.
A home from Dvele.

However, Howland attributes this more to the nature of Dvele’s “healthy” homes (more on this in a bit) than the prefab aspect.

A home from Dvele. 34
A home from Dvele.

Dvele emphasizes a mid-century modern design with an open floor plan throughout its homes.

A home from Dvele. 213
A home from Dvele.

Peeking around inside, the units all look similar to that of any traditionally built home.

A home from Dvele. 41
A home from Dvele.

Aspects like the large windows, sliding doors, entertainment areas, custom cabinets, and modern utilities make its prefab nature almost unidentifiable.

A home from Dvele. 43
A home from Dvele.

The homes all have robust air quality, water filtration, and energy saving systems.

A home from Dvele. 225
A home from Dvele.

The homes can also be customized, and customers can pick from one of Dvele’s six different exterior finishes.

A home from Dvele.10
A home from Dvele.

Most of Dvele’s clients slightly customize their homes to fulfill their “dream home and lifestyle,” according to Howland.

A home from Dvele.12
A home from Dvele.

Dvele has 13 models of varying sizes, but it’s Elsinore model is its most popular.

The Elsinore model's  2
The Elsinore model.

Elsinore has been a hit with the customers due to its design, open floor plan, and “popular bedroom and bathroom mix,” Howland told Insider.

The Elsinore model's front entry.
The Elsinore model’s front entry.

The $640,000 Elsinore home is 2,940 square-feet with four bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms.

The Elsinore model.2
The Elsinore model.

The popular home has an open kitchen, dining, and living room layout. There are also separate laundry and powder rooms.

The Elsinore model's kitchen.
The Elsinore model’s kitchen.

The kitchen looks like any normal cooking area with its cabinets, pantry, stovetop, dishwasher, oven, and refrigerator.

The Elsinore model's kitchen. 2
The Elsinore model’s kitchen.

Moving on, the living room has its own cabinets, an optional electric fireplace, and sliding doors that lead occupants out to the patio.

The Elsinore model's living room.
The Elsinore model’s living room.

The primary bedroom then has its own bathroom and a walk-in closet with wardrobes …

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom.
A home from Dvele.

… while the other two bedrooms share a bathroom.

The Elsinore model's primary bedroom's bathroom. 2
The Elsinore model’s primary bedroom’s bathroom.

The fourth bedroom – which can function as a guest room – has its own restroom.

The Elsinore model's guest bedroom.
The Elsinore model’s guest bedroom.

The full bathrooms all have the typical necessities, including wall-mounted toilets, showers, and vanities.

A home from Dvele. 227
A home from Dvele.

Other models in Dvele’s arsenal include the 3,523 square-foot Trinity. This option, the company’s largest offering, starts at $670,000 and includes four bedroom and 3.5 bathroom.

A home from Dvele.6
A home from Dvele.

Tiny home enthusiasts can also find their fit with the company’s three 419 square-foot tiny homes ranging from $150,000 to $180,000.

The Emerald Mini Home from Dvele.2
The Emerald Mini Home from Dvele.

No matter the model, all Dvele homes are built with DveleIQ, the company’s proprietary “whole home solution” that integrates artificial intelligence “from the foundation up” to make a home’s interior environment healthier.

A home from Dvele. 24
A home from Dvele.

“While DveleIQ facilitates the normal convenience features of smart home tech, it also provides an intelligent system that will enhance the health of the occupant, the home’s energy efficiency, and even the durability of the home,” Howland wrote.

A home from Dvele. 39
A home from Dvele.

Smart homes aren’t just about lights that turn on and off automatically.

A home from Dvele. 222
A home from Dvele.

To Dvele, a smart home is a home that creates a healthy environment while learning to become become more efficient overtime.

A home from Dvele. 231
A home from Dvele.

The “software-defined” homes use over 300 sensors and DveleIQ to monitor different aspects of the home, from mold to carbon dioxide.

A home from Dvele.9
A home from Dvele.

The home can then look into the reasons of any issues that have popped up.

The Elsinore model.
The Elsinore model.

For example, when the humidity level falls under a certain point, the home’s system will check for potential causes, such as open doors and the number of people in the home.

A home from Dvele. 28
A home from Dvele.

Another example: if the system notices potential water or mold damage, it will let the homeowners know, and can notify Dvele for any possible solutions.

A home from Dvele.4
A home from Dvele.

However, the units still have all the typical “smart home” features.

A home from Dvele. 31
A home from Dvele.

For example, the home can monitor its occupant’s schedule and preferred thermostat settings to set the interior temperature before the homeowner arrives back from an outing, preventing the thermostat from working even when the home is empty.

A home from Dvele.5
A home from Dvele.

To monitor its occupants, the home can use tools like smart phones and “energy consumption patterns,” according to Howland.

A home from Dvele. 44
A home from Dvele.

“Our homes are constantly learning about their occupants and adapting to them as they start to understand a user’s interaction with the home, anticipate their needs, and facilitate them through the home’s systems,” Howland wrote.

A home from Dvele. 47
A home from Dvele.

Dvele currently has a growing list of about 100 “intelligence home automations” that include detecting maintenance problems and helping its occupants relax at the end of the day, according to Howland.

A home from Dvele. 228
A home from Dvele.

“The goal of DveleIQ was to build a software-defined home that could sense in real time the state of the home and react accordingly,” Howland wrote. “Because of this, every Dvele home is continually getting better, like how software updates to a Tesla make it continually better.”

A home from Dvele.1
A home from Dvele.

According to Howland, the public has received DveleIQ well, especially as more people have begun understanding that a “smart home” isn’t just automatic lights and temperature settings.

A home from Dvele. 32
A home from Dvele.

Beyond technological innovations for healthier homes, Dvele also excels in the sustainability space.

A home from Dvele. 211
A home from Dvele.

Dvele is able to decrease its waste output because its homes are prefabricated with different models that use several of the same materials.

A home from Dvele. 49
A home from Dvele.

With the help of DveleIQ, the homes are also designed to be planet friendly by incorporating aspects like solar power, insulation, and efficient hot water heaters.

A home from Dvele. 229
A home from Dvele.

Keeping in line with the company’s green forward mission, Dvele plants 10,000 trees for every home built, and uses “sustainable material sourcing.”

A home from Dvele. 21
A home from Dvele.

Like other sustainable prefab home makers, Dvele aims for passive house certifications.

A home from Dvele. 221
A home from Dvele.

The homes are also all self-powered, taking away any reliance on larger power grids.

A home from Dvele. 36
A home from Dvele.

This is possible with a Dvele home’s insulation, energy efficient amenities, and solar power use.

A home from Dvele. 230
A home from Dvele.

A Dvele home’s solar panel output changes per location and home type. As of now, most of the company’s units are based in California, according to Howland.

A home from Dvele. 217
A home from Dvele.

The prefab units also have backup battery and energy storage systems just in case.

A home from Dvele. 218
A home from Dvele.

Are you an EV owner? No worry. A Dvele home’s systems have enough energy to charge an electric vehicle.

A home from Dvele. 410
A home from Dvele.

“DveleIQ and our ‘Self-Powered’ initiative were both very well received by the market and we saw an uptick in owners looking for quality healthy homes,” Howland wrote. “Our sales and interest have continued to exceed our boldest expectations, it’s been awesome to see how our core tenets are resonating with prospective owners.”

A home from Dvele. 215
A home from Dvele.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Washington company is creating $5,000 prefab tiny homes that can be setup in 30 minutes to help solve the homelessness crisis – see how it works

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

  • Pallet is building tiny homes for people who have lost their homes due to natural and personal disasters.
  • Like other tiny home makers, Pallet saw an uptick in popularity last year.
  • The tiny homes can be installed close to each other to create a community of Pallet units.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Expensive tiny homes have been in high demand since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. But on the opposite end of the spectrum, a tiny home maker specializing in personal units for the homeless has also seen a surge in interest.

Pallet, a social purpose company, creates shelters for people facing homelessness as a result of natural and personal disasters. These personal tiny homes can be set up in multiples to create small communities, allowing occupants to have safety and privacy away from larger community shelter buildings.

“What we felt was really missing from the housing spectrum was a dignified shelter option that honored their individuality and allowed them to have autonomy in their rehabilitation process,” Amy King, founder and CEO of Pallet, told Insider. 

Read more: How a formerly homeless sneakerhead with just $40 to his name built a multi-million dollar resale empire in 6 years

The company’s main customer base is municipalities, although it’s received orders from nonprofits, religious organizations, and people who own plots of land.

According to King, while the tiny home community concept has been present for some time now, it’s definitely become more of a trend as of late. 

Like other tiny home makers, Pallet first started seeing an uptick in interest in March 2020. However, when early October hit, municipalities started realizing they would need individual shelters for people without homes during COVID-19-plagued wintertime.

This realization then created a second wave of Pallet interest in the same year.

The units were initially designed to serve as shelters for people who had lost their homes due to natural disasters, such as fires.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

However, the company started opening its scope of potential occupants when homelessness began reaching a similar “disaster emergency level,” according to King.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Fresno, California.

Despite the potential to capitalize off of the tiny home boom, Pallet currently does not sell any of its units to one-off costumers looking for a backyard tiny home.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

“Right now, we are heavily focused on the humanitarian crisis in front of us,” King said. “We will not stop until homelessness has ended in this country, so that’s where we’re focusing our attention for the time being.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

Last year, Pallet built over 1,500 new beds across the US. There are now Pallets in states like California, Minnesota, Texas, and Hawaii.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Source: Pallet

It took Pallet five or six different iterations before it settled on this final design.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Pallet offers two shelter sizes: the 64-square-foot Pallet 64, and the 100-square-foot Pallet 100. Prices start at $4,900 and $7,000, respectively.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Fresno, California.

The sleeping cabins consist of an aluminum frame and fiber-reinforced plastic composite walls.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

These walls are insulated, but the home also comes with a heater and an air conditioner.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Like any home, the shelters are equipped with safety elements like a lockable door, a smoke detector, and a carbon monoxide monitor.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

The shelters can accommodate up to four beds with a folding bunk bed system, although the beds can optionally be replaced with desks.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

In terms of storage, the tiny home has shelves and room for under-bed storage.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

The structure can withstand up to 100 mile-per-hour winds and manage up to 25 pounds per square-foot of snow.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

If that’s not enough, Pallet also has an “extreme weather” version originally developed for a Hood River, Oregon location.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

However, none of the homes have bathrooms. This was intentional: the company wants its units to serve as “temporary stabilizing shelters” while its occupants wait for a more permanent option.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Also, plumbing is expensive and more difficult to maintain, which would have driven the tiny home’s price up.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

With that being said, Pallet is currently prototyping a bathroom and has previously trialed a community room. Looking forward, Pallet might test a kitchen facility as well.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

The units have a lifespan of more than 10 years, but many people only reside in these tiny homes for months at a time.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

The units are also easy to clean and sanitize in between occupants, which is key given the homelessness emergency during the COVID-19 pandemic.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

Unlike permanent “congregate” shelter options that could take years to build, Pallet’s prefabricated tiny homes can be setup in under 30 minutes, and a full village can be created within 10 days.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

This allows Pallet to quickly and inexpensively address the homelessness crisis in the US.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Shelter 64.

While Pallet specializes in making individual shelters, the company recognizes the need for community shelters as well.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

“Unfortunately, the homelessness crisis in this country has escalated to a point that we need all products,” King said. “Each person needs something different, and we need to have a diversified opportunity for people to get their needs met.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Multnomah County.

Homelessness isn’t the only issue Pallet is tackling.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

The Washington-based company’s “social purpose” title means it serves as a combination between a for-profit and a non-profit organization.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

As a result, profits made are put back into the company’s two main missions: stopping “unsheltered homelessness,” and creating a “nontraditional workforce.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet 100.

To the latter point, 90% of Pallet’s employees have once faced addiction, incarceration, or homelessness.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

Pallet offers these employees workforce and “life skills” training, which includes teaching them how to start a bank account or get an ID.

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
Pallet shelters in Santa Cruz, California.

Source: Pallet

“If we didn’t have them, I don’t think we’d be nearly [as successful],” King said. “They’re not just workers for us, they’re helping lead the concept here.”

pallet shelters tiny home homeless
The Pallet factory.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A New York company has created a wildly popular $21,000 DIY cabin that can be built in 3 days

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

  • Den Outdoors unveiled a $21,000 do-it-yourself A-frame Cabin kit that can be assembled in three days with the help of two or three people.
  • The A-frame Cabin kit targets three segments that have experienced a shake-up during COVID-19 times: DIY-ers, remote and tiny living, and tourism.
  • The interior can fit up to two people and the structure is only semi-permanent, which means it can be taken apart and moved as needed.
  • The kit and Den Outdoors have received so much interest, the company is now contemplating raising a seed round “because the business continues to grow despite our lack of resources,” Den founder Mike Romanowicz told Business Insider in an email interview.
  • According to Den, the kit is a good option for companies in the glamping and hospitality business, and for people looking to list properties on Airbnb.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Den Outdoors unveiled a do-it-yourself A-frame Cabin kit that can be assembled in three days.

Unlike most cabin and tiny home makers that sell fully built units, New York-based Den Outdoors takes the approach of selling both construction plans and do-it-yourself kits with all of the necessary parts. In line with these two product types, the A-frame cabin’s plans can be purchased for $99, and the full DIY kit starts at $21,000.

Read more: The top 5 do-it-yourself home renovations to maximize your property value, from the dean of a top-ranked interior design program

According to Den founder Mike Romanowicz in an email interview with Business Insider, the company and its cabin kit has seen a “huge swell of traffic and interested customers.”

“What’s propelling the product’s popularity is that we’ve launched something that has exactly the right characteristics that people want,” Romanowicz wrote in the email interview with Business Insider. “It’s beautiful, fast to build, and accessibly priced relative to other options in the market.”

Keep scrolling to see inside the wildly hyped A-frame cabin:

Read more: Here’s the pitch deck this New York startup used to raise $15 million to expand the services it offers its community of 17 million do-it-yourselfers

The A-frame Cabin kit comes in three finishes: a black Forest, grey Alpine, and cream Coast.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Den Outdoors

The back of the cabin has a large floor-to-ceiling double-pane glass window for a flood of natural light.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The 115-square foot cabin is 12 feet tall with 11-foot ceilings …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… and has room for two people with a king bed or two twin beds.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame can remain both on or off-grid, and has insulated floors and windows, making it four-seasons friendly.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

It’s no surprise the A-frame kit has become so popular given trends that have appeared during COVID-19.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The product capitalizes on two movements that have exploded during the coronavirus pandemic: tiny and remote living, and do-it-yourself projects.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame cabin fits perfectly in the tiny home segment boom that both rental companies and makers have been seeing during the coronavirus pandemic, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Wall Street Journal

According to Romanowicz, people have been looking for spaces that are near the outdoors, whether that be in the form of a tiny home, “normal” sized home, or cabin.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“People are moving from cities to residential areas, and folks still in cities are seeking vacation homes for extra space and a place to go retreat from urban living,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Similarly, people started seeking do-it-yourself projects – especially home renovations – while stuck at home due to COVID-19-related lockdowns.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to Romanowicz, people have been seeking “self reliance” during the COVID-19 pandemic, whether it be through baking bread or completing do-it-yourself projects.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to a blog published in July by market and consumer analysis company Netbase Quid, DIY-related trends are seeing an “explosive growth” with a yearly 4% growth rate.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Source: Netbase Quid

To target this segment, Den decided to make the kit easy to successfully assemble.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

These new living trends, coupled with the rise in DIY-ers, created the perfect storm for Den Outdoors and its cabin kit.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The company was officially launched this past July. Since then, Den has already seen explosive growth “partially aided by the tailwinds that COVID-19 is providing,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The company now has about 24,400 followers on Instagram, over 10,000 customers in its email database, and has seen sales increasing monthly from organic growth alone.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“To date, we’ve been self-funded, but we’re now heavily considering raising a seed round because the business continues to grow despite our lack of resources,” Romanowicz wrote. “The path to scalable growth and profitability lies clearly ahead.”

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The do-it-yourself kit also touches upon another segment impacted by COVID-19: tourism.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den’s cabin kit targets more than the private customer who wants a backyard cabin.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The kit can also be used by glamping property owners or those interested in renting the space out for Airbnb use.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

In fact, the kit was in part designed for the hospitality industry as the cabin can be listed with high nightly rates …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… but can be set up quickly and inexpensively, making it a good investment, according to its maker.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Because the cabin is four seasons-approved, it can withstand the wintertime when revenue for glamping and camping-related businesses is generally lower due to non-insulated tents.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Like a tent, the cabin can be easily assembled and disassembled and is portable.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

However, the A-frame is more durable than a canvas tent, which is a glamping structure that many companies have started using, according to Den.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“Because of all that, a lot of our interest has come from larger platforms in the camping and glamping industry, as well as from a number of different hotel and hospitality operators and developers who are looking to fix their seasonality problem while offering beautiful accommodations to their guests,” Romanowicz wrote.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The full A-frame is also small enough to be placed without a permit.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The cabin is similar to a shed in that a permanent concrete foundation is not necessary …

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

… although Den recommends placing the cabin on concrete pavers or deck blocks.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The cabin can also be used as more than just a glamping outpost or a backyard escape.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The A-frame can also serve as a place to work out, or as a separate office room.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

According to the company, several people have already purchased the kit to use as a backyard office.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

The kits are now being designed and produced in New York with the goal of providing “revenue, jobs, and stability” during the coronavirus pandemic, according to Den’s press question-and-answer sheet.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

“We were fortunate enough to partner with an incredibly talented local team with the right skills and tooling to enable us to build this with thoughtful craftsmanship, precision componentry, and in a cost-effective way to enable us to get to a competitive price,” the company explained.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den is considering unveiling more kits in the future, but as of now, it’s focused on A-frame order fulfillments.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Den Outdoors will begin shipping out the A-frame kits next year.

Den A-frame cabin
The assembled Den A-frame cabin.

Read the original article on Business Insider

More than half of Americans said they would consider living in a tiny home in a new survey as the lifestyle increases in popularity amid the pandemic

Natura one-bedroom tiny home
The Tiny Housing Co’s one-bedroom Natura tiny home.

  • Tiny homes have become popular during the coronavirus pandemic, and with this sudden surge comes new tiny home trends.
  • IPX1031, a Fidelity National Financial subsidiary, surveyed 2,006 Americans to measure the public interest in tiny housing.
  • Over half of the respondents reported that they would consider living in a tiny home, and of those who are not yet homeowners, 86% said they would consider purchasing a tiny home as their first home.
  • Of those surveyed, 72% said they would consider using a tiny home as an investment property. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tiny homes have become undeniably popular during the coronavirus pandemic, and with this sudden surge comes new tiny home trends.

According to a survey by Fidelity National Financial subsidiary IPX1031, 56% of the 2,006 American respondents reported they would consider living in a tiny home.

Of those surveyed who are not yet homeowners, 86% said they would contemplate purchasing a tiny home as their first home and 84% of those surveyed said they would consider a tiny home as a retirement living option.

Read more: California’s housing crisis is so dire, a startup just raised $3.5 million in VC funding to drop tiny houses in people’s backyards

Affordability, efficiency, eco-friendliness, and minimalism were cited, in that order, as the four most attractive factors that the tiny home lifestyle has to offer. 

It’s no surprise the economical aspects of tiny living was listed by 65% of those surveyed as the most enticing factor of tiny living. The median price of a tiny home falls within the $30,000 to $60,000 range, while the median price of a traditional home sits at $233,400, according to IPX1031. As a result, 79% of survey respondents reported being able to afford the median price of a tiny home, while only 53% said the same for a traditional home.

Aspects like mobility and privacy fell lower on the list of attractive factors, although 54% of survey respondents said they would want a mobile home, and a home under 400 square feet.

The rental trend 

Dark Horse tiny home
The Dark Horse tiny home.

This uptick in tiny home popularity can be attributed to more than just those looking for a permanent downsize. Tiny homes have also become a popular target for tourists looking for an escape during COVID-19, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal, and tiny homemakers have now started targeting customers who want tiny units to rent out or to list on Airbnb.

As a result, 72% of respondents said they would consider using a tiny home as an investment property, with 63% of those people reporting they would use it as a long term rental unit at an average monthly rent of $900. In contrast, 37% said they would rather rent their tiny home for short term stays on platforms like Airbnb and Vrbo with an average nightly rate of $145.

According to the report’s analysis of 1,300 tiny home-related Google search keywords, tiny homes are currently the most popular in the northwest and northeast of the US.

IPX1031 conducted the survey, which was made up of 55% female and 45% male, between November 1 and 5. The median age of those surveyed was 38, and the majority of people surveyed had an income under $80,000, with 37% of respondents making under $40,000, and 46% making between $40,000 to 80,000. 

Read the original article on Business Insider