Amazing photos show the Air Force’s biggest plane testing flares to lure away enemy missiles

C-5M Super Galaxy cargo plane flares
A 436th Airlift Wing C-5M Super Galaxy releases flares during a test at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, May 12, 2021.

  • The giant C-5M Super Galaxy released flares during a defensive countermeasures test on the Eglin range.
  • Flares are high-temperature heat sources used to mislead surface-to-air or air-to-air missiles’ heat-seekers.
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A C-5M Super Galaxy, belonging to the 436th Airlift Wing, from Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, was involved in a defensive countermeasures testing campaign that saw the US Air Force’s largest aircraft release flares, at night, over an area of the Eglin range, Florida.

Each night, the C-5M released more than 15 flares, repeating the same operation several times, entering the area from different entry points and angles, to increase aircraft and crew combat survivability by evaluating and fielding improved defensive systems capabilities.

Flares are high-temperature heat sources used to mislead surface-to-air or air-to-air missiles’ heat-seeking targeting systems, creating the pyrotechnic visual effect similar to a fireworks display.

Such countermeasures are used against MANPADS (Man Portable Air Defense Systems) and IR-guided surface-to-air missiles.

The giant C-5M Super Galaxy released flares at 300 knots and 1,500 feet: A unique opportunity for both the 9th Airlift Squadron’s operational aircrew involved in the testing and the US Air Force photographer Samuel King Jr., who took the amazing shots you can find in this story.

C-5M Super Galaxy cargo plane flares
A C-5M releases flares during a test at Eglin Air Force Base, May 12, 2021.

“There are rare situations when the aircraft does pop flares,” said Capt. Bryan Chanson, 9th AS pilot in a news release.

“The crew is usually focused primarily on flying out or away from the potential threat and hoping flares do their intended jobs. The testing allowed us to gain the situational awareness to concentrate on flare dispense in a safe environment.”

C-5M Super Galaxy cargo plane flares
A C-5M releases flares during a test at Eglin Air Force Base, May 12, 2021.

“Countermeasure testing like this is a Team Eglin event,” said Capt. Daniel Clarke, 46th TS Defensive Systems Flight commander. “Our test engineers work hand in hand with the 96th Range Group to ensure resources are ready to test and collect data and the 96th Maintenance Group ensures every flare tested is loaded on to each aircraft.”

Interestingly, the C-5M Super Galaxy testing with flares was just the start of a two-month test program, according to the Air Mobility Command.

Through the end of June, the 96th Cyberspace Test Group will execute flare testing on four more aircraft from Air Force Special Operations Command, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve Command Test Center and AMC.

Let’s wait for some more cool flares shots then!

C-5M Super Galaxy cargo plane flares
A C-5M releases flares during a test at Eglin Air Force Base, May 12, 2021.

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A B-1B bomber involved in a failed ejection-seat incident has been retired to take on a new mission

Air Force B-1B Lancer bomber
B-1B Lancer “Spectre” is towed into the 76th Aircraft Maintenance Group’s Expeditionary Depot Maintenance Flight training facility at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, April 10, 2021.

  • The B-1B bomber “Spectre” retired to become an advanced maintenance trainer at Tinker Air Force Base.
  • The bomber was involved in a May 2018 incident in which a fire led to an ejection seat misfire, after which the crew had to make an emergency landing.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The US Air Force disclosed a few days ago that, in early April, the B-1B Lancer 86-109/DY, nicknamed “Spectre,” has been retired at Tinker Air Force Base to become an advanced maintenance trainer.

The aircraft was towed to an Aircraft Battle Damage Repair training pad at the 76th Maintenance Group’s Expeditionary Depot Maintenance Flight on the south side of the base, where it joined a B-52 Stratofortress and a C-135 Stratolifter.

The same “Bone” (as the B-1 is nicknamed in the pilot community) was involved in a May 2018 in-flight emergency while it was returning to Dyess Air Force Base (Texas) after a routine training sortie.

Multiple fire warnings lighted in the cockpit as the engine number three caught fire and reportedly spread to another engine. All but one fire were extinguished and, following the emergency checklist’s procedures, the crew initiated the ejection sequence.

However, when the Offensive Systems Operator’s ejection seat failed to leave the plane successfully, the aircraft commander ordered the crew to immediately stop the escape procedure and diverted to Midland International Air and Space Port near Odessa, Texas, still on fire with a missing hatch, no cockpit pressurization and an armed ejection seat that could fire at any moment, performing a successful emergency landing without injury or further damage to the aircraft. The four crew members have been later awarded the Air Force’s Distinguished Flying Cross.

At the end of October 2018, the damaged B-1B was flown to Tinker AFB by an Air Force Reserve crew from the 10th Flight Test Squadron. The crew had to fly the “Bone” on just three engines without raising the landing gear and without sweeping the wings for the entirety of the flight.

At that time, the press release said that “Spectre” was to “undergo depot maintenance and upgrades at the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex, be quality tested by the 10th FLTS, and be returned to the Dyess AFB B-1B Lancer fleet upon completion.”

Air Force B-1B Lancer bomber
B-1B Lancer 86-109, known as “Spectre,” is towed down Patrol Road at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, April 10, 2021.

It seems however that there was a change of plans, as the aircraft was included in the 17 B-1Bs with the least amount of usable life that have been marked for early retirement to allow the Air Force to prioritize the health of the fleet.

These bombers had experienced significant structural fatigue, with cracks appearing in highly stressed structural components joining the wings to the fuselage, which would have required each $10 to $30 million for the repairs.

“The artisans of the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex repaired the damaged nacelle, replaced the ejection system, and performed both the Integrated Battle Station modification and a full Programmed Depot Maintenance overhaul,” said Col. Greg Lowe, 76th Aircraft Maintenance Group commander. “Despite all of the work, the aircraft was selected for retirement, but it will be a welcome addition to the ABDR [Aircraft Battle Damage Repair] program.”

So, after 12,136 flying hours and almost three years after that in-flight emergency, “Spectre” left the flight line for the last time following its divestiture which saw the removal of its engines, certain avionics and other equipment not essential for its new mission.

According to the press release, for the aircraft to safely leave the flight line and travel to its new home, two temporary gravel ramps were constructed. A number of road signs, poles and a power line had to be temporarily removed to give the aircraft an unobstructed path.

The bomber’s wings were kept in their swept position to keep the aircraft’s footprint as narrow as possible, with two counterweights, each weighing 2,640 pounds, suspended from the forward section of the aircraft to preserve the balance as it was towed.

Following the 20 minute-long, half-mile trip, the wings “were manually brought forward one at a time using only a cordless drill, which took about 5 minutes per wing,” instead of the usual 10 seconds when done in flight.

Even if now retired, “Spectre” will still perform, within the Expeditionary Depot Maintenance Flight, an important mission that will be advantage of the entire B-1B fleet.

“This aircraft will be important to train for advanced repair techniques and as an engineering test aid for form, fit, and function of future modifications and structural repairs,” said Col. Lowe.

As mentioned in the press release, the Expeditionary Depot Maintenance flight is responsible for maintaining the Air Force’s sole source for ABDR rapid repair capabilities for the entire tanker and bomber fleets, which are tested and trained on its B-52 and C-135 maintenance trainers and, from now on, also on the B-1.

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Here’s how the A-10 Warthog’s legendary Avenger Gatling gun really works

GAU 8 vw a-10 gun
The GAU-8/A Avenger Gatling gun next to a VW Type 1.

  • Wanna know what’s behind the trademark BRTTTTT noise of the A-10 Warthog’s GAU-8/A Avenger Gatling Gun?
  • The video below, produced by the 3D Mil-Tech YouTube channel, shows in extensive detail how the Avenger works.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Dubbed Warthog, Hog or just Hawg, the A-10 Thunderbolt II is, basically, an airplane built around the GAU-8 Avenger 30-mm hydraulically driven seven-barrel Gatling-type cannon.

The Avenger cannon is the Hog primary weapon and is able to fire 3,900 bullets per minute.

“It’s a highly-accurate point-and-shoot weapon that grants our pilots superior firepower and flexibility in a close-combat ground fight,” a Warthog pilot once told us. The GAU-8 is rated at “5 mil, 80%,” meaning that 80% of rounds will hit within a 5-mil circle, with mils being milliradiants (at 1,000 feet five mils would be 5 m hence 80% of rounds would hit within a 5-m circle and that’s at 70 rounds a second).

A 10 Warthog
A US Air Force maintainer adjusts equipment on an A-10 Warthog at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, April 17, 2002.

Everything in the A-10 is designed to “make room” to the gun, including the nose landing gear, offset to the right of the aircraft so that the firing barrel lines up along the center of the airframe.

More in detail, as the gun’s recoil forces could push the entire plane off target during strafes, the gun itself is mounted laterally off-center, slightly to the port side of the fuselage centerline, with the actively “firing” barrel in the nine o’clock position (when viewed from the front of the aircraft), so that the firing barrel lies directly on the aircraft’s centerline.

The firing barrel also lies just below the aircraft’s center of gravity, being bore-sighted along a line 2 degrees below the aircraft’s line of flight. This arrangement accurately centers the recoil forces, preventing changes in aircraft pitch or yaw when fired.

Each of its seven barrels has an internal riffling groove which passes through the whole length of the barrel so that a spin on each round can be induced.

The 1,150 30-mm rounds of bullets stored in the drum weigh about 4,000 pounds: this means that the weight of the rounds and their shells has to be taken in consideration to position of the center of gravity of the aircraft. Without the rounds, you would actually have to put ballast in the nose on an empty gun to balance the airplane!

a10 damage a 10 gau-8 avenger rotary cannon
An armored vehicle after being hit by an A-10 providing close air support.

Other design features of the Warthog support the operation of the Avenger.

For instance, as explained by Maj. Cody “ShIV” Wilton, the commander of the A-10 Demo Team, in a pretty epic walkaround video we have published last year, the slat on each wing – that are not slats in the traditional airplane sense as they do not generate lift nor help the pilot land any slower it, but they smooth the airflow off the wing in the engine and prevent stalls when the aircraft flies at high AOA (Angle Of Attack) – also helps diverting the gun gas underneath the wing so it doesn’t suffocate the engine (as the gun gas does not have oxygen) when the aircraft uses the gun.

There’s also a wind fence that, when the gun is shooting, diverts the gas down the fuselage.

The stunning video below, produced by the 3D Mil-Tech YouTube channel, shows with unprecedented details, how the GAU-8 Avenger works: It gives an idea of the seven-barrel carriage assembly including the double-ended feed system which allows the spent casings to be returned to the ammunition drum.

What a fine piece of machinery!

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US F-15E fighter jets did their munitions transport mission in their new ‘bomb truck’ configuration

Air Force F-15E fighter jet bomb truck
An F-15E Strike Eagle configured to carry extra bombs to bare base locations, taking off from an undisclosed location, April 25, 2021.

  • Six F-15E Strike Eagles relocated as part of an Agile Combat Employment operation.
  • The fighters were in their “bomb truck” configuration, each bringing 12 JDAMs and 4 SDBs.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Just two months after it was tested at Eglin Air Force Base, the F-15Es of the US Air Force used for the first time the new “bomb truck” configuration during an operational mission in the US Central Command theater.

More precisely, six Strike Eagles of the 494th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron relocated to Al Dhafra Air Base (United Arab Emirates) on April 25 as part of an Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operation, bringing with them a heavy load of munitions to sustain combat missions from the new base.

The six F-15Es in “bomb truck” configuration are part of a larger deployment of 18 Strike Eagles of the 494th Fighter Squadron “Panthers,” which deployed from their homebase at RAF Lakenheath to an “undisclosed location” earlier this month.

This location is likely Muwaffaq Salti/Al-Azraq Air Base in Jordan, where Lakenheath’s other F-15E squadron, the 492nd Fighter Squadron “Bolars,” was deployed in 2020.

Air Force F-15E fighter jet bomb truck
An F-15E Strike Eagle configured to carry extra bombs to bare base locations, taking off from an undisclosed location, April 25, 2021.

The Bolars were relieved by the 391st Fighter Squadron “Bold Tigers” from Mountain Home AFB (Idaho), which are now being in turn relieved by the Panthers.

“These F-15Es are carrying what is called a ‘tac-ferry’ load out. What that means is we can maneuver using Agile Combat Employment, and be postured to go forward from a main operating base,” said Lt. Col. Curtis Culver, 494th EFS Director of Operations. “This is the next step for the Air Force in Agile Combat Employment. So instead of having multi-capable airmen that are exercising maneuver and logistics, now we’re doing that with sustained munitions to project power.”

Each of the six F-15Es in “bomb truck” configuration was carrying 12 500-kg-class JDAMs (Joint Direct Attack Munition), both the base GBU-38 and laser-guided variant GBU-54, and four GBU-39 SDBs (Small Diameter Bomb).

In this configuration, the Strike Eagle is actually carrying twice its standard bomb load, as testing at Eglin AFB allowed to clear for use all six attachment points on each “Fast Pack,” instead of just three.

Back then, the USAF noted that not all the JDAMs carried can be employed in a single mission, so it is possible that the six bombs mounted on the upper hardpoints of the “Fast Packs” may not be cleared for release in combat, but only for ferry flights.

Air Force F-15E fighter jet bomb truck
An F-15E Strike Eagle configured to carry extra bombs to bare base locations, taking off from an undisclosed location, April 25, 2021.

“We were asked to come out and support combat missions with a very short turnaround, and with the bombs not being built previously here for us. By carrying more bombs than we’d actually carry to drop, we’re setting up the initial days of combat,” said Capt. Jessica Niswonger, 494th EFS Weapon System Officer (WSO) and mission planner. After witnessing the arrival of the six F-15Es in “Bomb Truck” configuration, Capt. Niswonger added: “It was a great moment. I’m just glad to have the team here and now we’re going to get ready for combat ops.”

The forward-deployed 494th EFS with its F-15E “bomb truck” aircraft will begin flying air tasking orders immediately to support US Central Command priorities, according to the USAF press release.

It is not clear if the relocation of the six F-15Es to Al Dhafra Air Base is related to the flux of support fires that will protect US troops during the Afghanistan drawdown. Among those we can find four B-52H Stratofortress bombers of the 5th Bomb Wing from Minot Air Force Base (North Dakota) that were deployed last week to Al Udeid Air Base (Qatar).

Training for ACE operations has become routine for US Air Forces Europe units with the goal of being strategically predictable but operationally unpredictable, as it was originally mentioned in the 2018 National Defense Strategy, and capable of operating everywhere with minimal support.

Air Force F-15E fighter jet bomb truck
An F-15E Strike Eagle configured to carry extra bombs to bare base locations, taking off from an undisclosed location, April 25, 2021.

This concept can also be found in the new Air Force mission statement released earlier this month: “To fly, fight, and win … airpower anytime, anywhere”. The ability to fight and win with airpower is considered, in fact, the key factor to facing emerging competitors and near-peer adversaries.

According to the US Air Force, the ACE concept envisions the ability to generate airpower from austere airfields with varying levels of capacity and support in a contested environment, dispersing forces across different or remote airports and support their operations with fewer specialists.

The purpose is “to become more agile in our execution, more strategic in our deterrence, and more resilient in our capability. Agility, Deterrence, and Resiliency are essential to defense and operational capability in a contested environment,” the US Air Force in Europe website says when explaining the ACE Concept of Operations.

The latest ACE training operation is currently in progress in Poland, where 20 F-15s, both E and C variants, and four F-16s deployed from their homebases RAF Lakenheath and Spangdahlem Air Base (Germany), respectively, as part of Aviation Detachment Rotation (AvRot) 21-2.

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Russian bombers launched cruise missiles during a surge in military exercises

A Russian TU-95 bomber flies over East China Sea in this handout picture taken by Japan Air Self-Defence Force and released by the Joint Staff Office of the Defense Ministry of Japan July 23, 2019. Joint Staff Office of the Defense Ministry of Japan/HANDOUT via REUTERS
A Russian TU-95 bomber over East China Sea in a handout photo taken by Japan Air Self-Defense Force and released on July 23, 2019.

  • Russian Tu-95MS “Bear H” and the Tu-160 “Blackjack” bombers launched Kh-555 cruise missiles at a range in the Komi Republic.
  • This exercise was one of many during a recent surge of Russian military activity across the entire country, especially around the Black Sea.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Long-range Aviation Command of the Russian Air and Space Force conducted a command-staff exercise as part of the routine winter training, according to the Russian Ministry of Defence.

Notably, the exercise included the launch of cruise missiles from its Tu-95MS “Bear H” and Tu-160 “Blackjack” bombers. This exercise is one of the many disclosed during the recent surge of Russian military activity across the entire country and especially in the Black Sea region.

About 10 aircraft, including the Tu-95MSs, Tu-160s and their supporting Il-78 “Midas” tankers, flew from the Saratov region to a range in the Komi Republic, in northwestern Russia, west of Urals, where they struck ground targets with the cruise missiles, returning to their base after more than seven hours.

The mission included “[air-to-air] refueling at an altitude of more than 6,000 meters [about 19,700 ft] and a speed of about 600 kilometers per hour [about 320 kts], as well as air patrolling in a given zone.”

Although not mentioned in the statement from the MoD, the bombers involved should belong to the Bomber Regiments based at Engels airbase, which is in fact in the Saratov region, while the unspecified range should be the Pemboy range, which is in fact in the Komi Republic about 60 kilometers from Vorkuta.

The same range was also used in 2019 to perform the first test of the Kh-47M2 Kinzhal Hypersonic Missile in the Barents Sea region.

As for the cruise missiles, the MoD published a video from this exercise showing inert Kh-555 missiles being loaded in the bomb bays of both the Tu-95 and the Tu-160.

The Kh-555 is a conventionally armed variant of the Kh-55 (NATO reporting name AS-15 “Kent”) nuclear-tipped subsonic cruise missile, with an improved guidance system and a range of at least 2,500 km (1,350 nm), with some sources reporting it up to 3,000/3,500 km.

The missile became operational in the early 2000s and can be carried by the Tu-95 (six or 16 missiles, depending on the bomber’s version) and the Tu-160 (12 missiles).

According to some sources, the Su-34 “Fullback” is also capable of carrying one Kh-555, while it is not known if the Tu-22M3 “Backfire” has been fully integrated with the missile, even if it was being tested. The Kh-555 was used during Russian strikes against ISIS ground targets in Syria in 2015.

‘Surge’ in military drills

russia tu-160 bomber
Tupolev TU-160 strategic bomber at the MAKS-2005 international air show, outside Moscow, August 16, 2005.

This is just one of the bombers exercises in what some analysts called a “surge” of Russian military activity.

Another notable one happened a day after the cruise missile exercise, with two Tu-160 Blackjacks performing an eight-hour mission over the Baltic Sea escorted by Su-35Ss of the Aerospace Forces and Su-27s of the Baltic Fleet’s Naval Aviation, supported by an A-50 “Mainstay” Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) aircraft.

In response, NATO’s Combined Air Operations Centre (CAOC) at Uedem (Germany) launched allied fighter aircraft from bases in Estonia, Lithuania and Poland to intercept and identify the approaching Russian aircraft as some of them were not identifiable by transponder signal and no flight plan had been filed, posing a flight safety hazard for civilian air traffic.

More precisely, NATO specified that the Russian aircraft were intercepted by German and Italian Eurofighter Typhoons from the Baltic Air Policing mission in Estonia and Lithuania, respectively, and Polish Air Force F-16Cs fighters from Poznan Air Base.

In addition, the Royal Danish Air Force national air operations centre scrambled their F-16s from Skrydstrup Air Base. The bombers stayed in international airspace above the Baltic Sea and returned to mainland Russia after roughly three hours.

These recent bomber missions do not seem to be related to the Russian buildup around Ukraine and Crimea which has caused concern among the international community.

Officially, according to the Russian MoD, the buildup is due to scheduled exercises which are taking place in Crimean training ranges and the Black Sea to check the readiness of the Armed Forces.

Numerous armored and air defense units, tactical aircraft and warships have been deployed in the area, under the eyes of cellphones and social medias on the ground and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) and Signal Intelligence (SIGINT) aircraft in the sky.

As always, disinformation and fake news are playing their part to further complicate the understanding of what is happening in the area and what we should expect in the near future.

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Dramatic video shows World War II-era TBM Avenger making emergency landing next to people on Florida beach

TBM Avenger emergency landing Florida beach
Grumman TBM Avenger #91188, operated by the Valiant Air Command, just before ditching off Cocoa Beach during the Cocoa Beach Air Show, April 17, 2021.

  • A Valiant Air Command Pilot made a perfect emergency water landing in a TBM Avenger on a Florida beach.
  • The pilot was able to ditch the aircraft in the shallow water in front of a beach area where spectators were watching the airshow.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Spectators captured dramatic video of the Valiant Air Command’s new Grumman TBM Avenger ditching (making an emergency water landing) on Saturday April 17, 2021, at the Cocoa Beach Air Show in Florida.

There were no injuries reported in the impressive display of airmanship by the TBM Avenger pilot.

The Grumman TBM/TBF Avenger is a single-engine, propeller driven, carrier-borne strike and torpedo bomber with a three-man crew. The aircraft was made famous in the Pacific during WWII in battles that include Midway and the sinking of the giant Japanese battleships Yamato and Mushashi.

Grumman TBF-1 Avengers
Five US Navy Grumman TBF-1 Avengers in formation over Norfolk, Virginia, September 1, 1942.

The aircraft could carry either 2,000 pounds of bombs or a single Mk. 13 torpedo in the anti-shipping strike role. The Avenger was flown by former US President George H.W. Bush, who also survived an accident in his TBM Avenger during WWII when he bailed out of his aircraft before being rescued by a US Navy submarine.

The Grumman TBM Avenger involved in yesterday’s ditching was flying with several other types of historic planes during the airshow including a twin-engine C-47 Dakota transport in a loose trail formation just prior to the ditching. A small amount of smoke briefly appeared from the aircraft in some videos just prior to the emergency water landing.

The pilot did an impressive job of ditching the aircraft in the shallow water directly in front of a beach area where spectators were watching the flight demonstrations. The aircraft can be seen flying slowly at wave-top level before finally stalling with wings level, then gently entering the water with what appears to be little damage.

The aircraft involved in the accident, number 91188, was originally built by the Eastern Aircraft Division of General Motors Corporation in 1945 and operated for the US Navy as Bureau Number 91188.

Today the aircraft flies under civil registration number N108Q and is owned by the Valiant Air Command.

The Grumman TBM Avenger involved in the incident was restored to flying status just over a year ago on January 11, 2020, following an extensive 18-year restoration to airworthiness. Prior to her restoration, she had last flown from 1956 until 1964 while operating as a water bomber in the forest fire suppression role for the US Forestry Service in Davis, California.

In 1964, the aircraft was transferred to the Georgia Forestry Commission in Macon, Georgia where she continued the firefighting mission until 1969 when she was transferred between a series of private owners until purchased by the Valiant Air Command in 2002.

The Valiant Air Command was flying four aircraft at the Cocoa Beach Airshow including their flagship C-47 Dakota “Tico Bell,” a North American SNJ-4 trainer, an N2S Steerman biplane trainer and the TBM Avenger involved in the incident.

Ironically, the TBM Avenger that went down in the accident yesterday is painted in the same markings as one of the five TBM Avengers that disappeared in a famous incident in the “Bermuda Triangle” on December 5, 1945 that claimed the lives of 14 crewmen and an additional 13 that disappeared in a PBM-5 Mariner involved in a search operation for the five aircraft. The incident has remained as a significant piece of lore in the Bermuda Triangle superstition.

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Poland is buying 5 cargo planes out of the US Air Force’s ‘boneyard’

US Air Force C-130H
Airmen from the Wyoming Air National Guard prepare a C-130H for a mission out of Cheyenne, Wyoming, February 27, 2019.

  • Poland is buying five C-130H Hercules aircraft out of the “Boneyard” in the Arizona desert.
  • The aircraft will be partially retrofitted with new equipment, made flightworthy, and flown to Poland.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Armament Inspectorate of the Polish Ministry of Defense published a release stating that an intergovernmental agreement has been signed on April 12, 2021, concerning the delivery of five C-130H airlifters to Poland.

The deal is a part of the Excess Defense Articles grant program. The aircraft would be partially retrofitted with new equipment, made flightworthy, and then they would fly to Poland.

The agreement has a relatively low value – USD $14.3 million. The US side, the Polish MoD reports, assumes that five C-130H airframes that the Polish Air Force would receive. They are worth $60 million, as per the US quote. The deliveries would be finalized by mid-2024, with the first aircraft arriving this year.

According to the Polish MoD, the aircraft procured rolled off the production line in 1985 and then were decommissioned in 2017. After that, they were stored at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group facility (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. The above makes them 15 years younger than the C-130s currently operated by the Polish Air Force.

The technical status of the aircraft was assessed during the so-called Joint Visual Inspection procedure. It took place at AMARG in Tucson, stated the Inspectorate. The cost of the transfer to Poland was also a subject of this process.

C-130 Hercules takeoff landing gear
An Illinois Air National Guard C-130 Hercules takes off at Fort Carson in Colorado, September 12, 2016.

Then, after the transfer, the aircraft would undergo the periodic, scheduled maintenance (Programmed Depot Maintenance – PDM) at the WZL Nr 2 S.A. facility in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Bydgoszcz is also going to be the place where extra equipment, as required by the Polish Air Force, would be fitted onto the aircraft. Then the airframes are expected to become a part of the inventory of the 33rd Airlift Base in Powidz.

It has been pointed out by the experts that both the engines, as well as the propellers, along with the avionics, may need to be upgraded. What upgrades would be done within that scope remains unclear. However, to make the acquisition reasonable, the AMARG restoration work should also include an upgrade similar to the ones carried out in case of the ANG aircraft: a set of new T-56 Rolls Royce 3.5 engines and NP2000 eight-bladed propellers with electronic controls.

The PGZ Group’s WZL facility in Bydgoszcz provides the Polish Air Force with a relevant maintenance capability regarding the Hercules.

The Polish MoD was putting the airlift capability enhancements in the modernization plans – the procurement was designated as the Drop program. It involved Leonardo S.p.A., Airbus Defence & Space, Embraer, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing, but it was ultimately suspended in July last year. It seems that Poland went with second-hand airframes to serve as an intermediary gap-filler solution.

Krzysztof Płatek, spokesman for the Armament Inspectorate told us that the Drop program is to follow a schedule that is confidential. Procurement of the AMARG C-130s would diminish the pressure caused by deadlines and time.

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Video puts you in the cockpit of a Navy Prowler on a low-level flight through the Cascade Mountains

EA-6B Prowler
An EA-6B Prowler out of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, March 1, 2016.

  • This is what it looks like to fly an EA-6B Prowler on the Visual Route 1355 low-level military training route in Washington state.
  • VR 1355 is known as the “million-dollar ride” for its scenic views and the fun and “aggressive” flying that can be done on it.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The last US Marine Corps EA-6B Prowler squadron, Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 2 (VMAQ-2), was formally deactivated in March 2019, when the last two jets, 162230/CY-02 and 162228/CY-04, took part in a sundown ceremony that also included flying in formation over Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina.

All the US Navy and Marines Prowler squadrons had already been deactivated since then (the last ones being all USMC units: VMAQ-1, in May 2016, VMAQ-4 in June 2017 and VMAQ-3 in May 2018).

The EA-6B was an iconic aircraft born out of military requirements during the Vietnam War. It entered service in 1971 and 170 aircraft were built before the production was terminated in 1991. For more than four decades, the Prowler was “at the forefront of military electronic warfare allowing high-profile air combat missions.”

The EA-6B’s last deployment, in 2018, was carried out by VMAQ-2 to support of Operation Resolute Support and Freedom’s Sentinel, in Afghanistan, as well as Operation Inherent Resolve, in Iraq and Syria.

But, overall, the Prowler deployed more than 70 times to support every major combat operation, including those in Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and Serbia.

EA 6B Refuel

While not deployed, the type carried out stateside training sorties, practicing ground-attack support missions, disruption of enemy electromagnetic activity and tactical electronic intelligence.

While most of the latest mission profiles saw the aircraft operate at medium and high altitude, the Prowler’s aircrews regularly flew low-level training missions too.

The footage in this post was taken in 2010 by a user who, based on the other videos posted on his Youtube channel, flew with the US Navy’s VAQ-139 “Cougars.”

The clip is particularly interesting as it shows, from the front cockpit, an EA-6B flying low level along VR-1355, one of the low-level routes running through national parks in the Cascade Mountains.

As we explained in a post about a photo of an EA-18G taken there, the Visual Route 1355 is colloquially called the “million-dollar ride” for both the scenic views and the fun and “aggressive” flying that can be done through the valleys.

Thanks to the video below, now you can also get an idea of what it looked like to fly the route at low level in the Prowler.

While the footage is outstanding, I’m pretty sure it will also remind someone the famous incident that occurred to an EA-6B in Italy in 1998.

On February 3, 1998, EA-6B Prowler #163045/CY-02, from VMAQ-2, deployed at Aviano Air Base, in northeastern Italy, for the Balkans crisis, using radio callsign “EASY 01” and flying a low-level route cut a cable supporting a cable car of an aerial lift, near Cavalese, a ski resort in the Dolomites. Twenty people died when the cabin plunged over 260 feet and crashed on the ground in what is also known as the “Cavalese cable car disaster” or “Strage del Cermis.”

At 15:13 LT, when the aircraft struck the cables supporting the cable car the aircraft was flying at a speed of 540 mph (870 km/h) and at an altitude of between 260 and 330 feet (80 and 100 m) in a narrow valley between the mountains.

While the aircraft had wing and tail damage, it was able to return to Aviano.

The subsequent investigation found that the EA-6B was flying too low and against regulations. Initially, all four men on the plane were charged, but only the pilot, Capt. Richard J. Ashby, and his navigator, Capt. Joseph Schweitzer, actually faced trial (that took place at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina), charged with 20 counts of involuntary manslaughter and negligent homicide.

At the end of the first trial, the pilot was acquitted on all charges relating to the disaster (charges which were dropped for the navigator too) in a verdict that caused shock and resentment in Italy generating an upsurge of anti-American feeling.

During the trial it emerged that the US Marine Corps aircrews used obsolete US military maps that, unlike local ones, did not show the cables, and were not aware of altitude regulations concerning low-level flying.

The two Marines were court-martialed a second time when it became evident they had destroyed a videotape filmed on the day of the incident. Eventually, Capts. Ashby and Schweitzer were found guilty in May 1999; both were dismissed from the service and Ashby received a six-month prison term. Families were eventually compensated 1.9M USD per victim.

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Rare, close-up video shows a B-2 stealth bomber preparing for takeoff

Air Force B-2 bomber
A US B-2A bomber and a Dutch F-35A conduct aerial operations in support of Bomber Task Force Europe 20-2 over the North Sea, March 18, 2020.

  • This rare video shows how the B-2 Spirit’s control surfaces move during pre-flight checks.
  • Such tests are done after start-up and during taxi to make sure the surfaces can move freely.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In March last year, three US Air Force B-2 Spirits, belonging to the 509th Bomb Wing and the 131st Bomb Wing, Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, operated from RAF Fairford, UK, as part of Bomber Task Force Europe 20-2 deployment.

From there, the stealth bombers carried out a variety of missions across northern Europe, including one that saw the B-2s fly toward the Arctic, over Iceland.

As usual, their stay in the UK also provided a great opportunity for local aviation enthusiasts and spotters to get some cool in-action photos and videos of the tailless aircraft.

To that respect, the clip below is particularly interesting. Posted by “Saint1 Aviation Vids” Youtube channel, that includes many great videos of B-2s, B-52s and U-2s, it shows B-2 #82-1068, “Spirit of New York,” as it carries out pre-flight checks on its control surfaces before departing RAF Fairford.

Similar tests are conducted after start-up and during taxi in order to assess that the surfaces are not obstructed or limited and can freely move.

The video shows the movement of the split rudders and elevons that on the B-2 are installed along the trailing edge of the plane. Since the aircraft has no vertical fin, the split rudders and the elevons are used to control the aircraft rotation along the vertical/yaw axis, whereas pitch and roll are controlled by means of (mid and inboard) elevons. The split-rudders also act as speed brakes.

Unfortunately, the clip doesn’t provide a clear view of the Spirit’s peculiar exhaust and the wedge-shaped flap in the middle of the trailing edge, the GLAS (Gust Load Alleviation System), that looks like the aircraft’s beaver tail and counters the rolling impact or resonance to smooth out the ride of the B-2 in turbulent conditions and extend the aircraft’s fatigue life.

Air Force test data finite elemental analysis (FEA) modeling suggest the B-2 will remain structurally sound to approximately 40,000 flight hours. This analysis also revealed that the rudder attachment points at the B-2’s wingtips are the highest structural stress areas and will be the first to fail.

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Navy photos show a patrol plane armed with anti-ship missiles in the Middle East

Navy P-8A Poseidon AGM-84 Harpoon missile
Sailors load an AGM-84 Harpoon missile onto a P-8A Poseidon aircraft in the 5th Fleet area of operations, January 15, 2021.

  • A Navy P-8A Poseidon is shown carrying AGM-84D Harpoon missiles in photos taken in January but released this month.
  • It’s not the first time a Poseidon has been spotted with that kind of weapon, but it appears to be the first time a P-8 in the Persian Gulf has been seen with it.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

The US Navy P-8A Poseidon aircraft have started flying missions in the US 5th Fleet AOR (Area of Operations) carrying AGM-84D Harpoon missiles.

Images just released by the naval service through the DVIDS network show sailors assigned to the “Fighting Tigers” of Patrol Squadron 8, deployed with Commander, Task Force (CTF) 57, performing preflight checks on AGM-84 Harpoon missiles carried by a P-8A of VP-8 ahead of a mission in the US 5th Fleet area of operations (that encompasses the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and parts of the Indian Ocean) on January 15-16, 2021.

While the location where the images were taken has not been disclosed, it seems quite likely that the P-8A was being serviced at its usual deployment base in Manama, Bahrain, where P-3 Orion and Poseidon aircraft supporting CTF-57 are usually based.

CTF-57 is the maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft Task Force for the US 5th Fleet, Naval Forces Central Command, and Combined Maritime Forces.

CTF-57 aircraft conduct missions in support of maritime operations to ensure stability, security, and the free flow of commerce in the Central Command area of responsibility, which connects the Mediterranean and Pacific through the Western Indian Ocean.

Navy P-8A Poseidon
A P-8A Poseidon on a flight line in the 5th Fleet area of operations, January 16, 2021.

The AGM-84D Harpoon is an anti-ship missile that complements the Mk 54 air-launched lightweight torpedo, used for ASW (Anti-Submarine Warfare) mission.

It’s obviously not the first time the Poseidon is spotted carrying this kind of weapon, although it’s the first time we see this armament on a P-8 deployed to the Persian Gulf area.

We don’t know where the Poseidon with its live Harpoon payload flew after the shots were taken.

The P-8s are a common presence in the Persian Gulf area, where they have often been tracked by means of their Mode-S transponders. However, they also extend their patrols to the Gulf of Oman and to the Horn of Africa, where they support anti-piracy operations.

Still, considered when the image was taken (mid-January, a period of intense Iranian naval activity in the Persian Gulf and Strait of Hormuz), it seems more likely that that kind of weaponry was loaded to deter any kind of attack against US Navy warships and commercial traffic in the area.

In fact, the US has maintained a significant naval presence in region consistently since May 2019, as a hedge against Iran. Since then, a carrier strike group has been positioned in the Gulf round-the-clock, with few gaps in presence.

At the beginning of February, USS Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group and embarked Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 164 (Reinforced), 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (with its F-35Bs) transited the Strait of Hormuz to operate in the Persian Gulf replacing USS Nimitz, after supporting Operation Octave Quartz off the coast of Somalia.

Navy P-8A Poseidon AGM-84 Harpoon missile
A sailor preforms a preflight check on an AGM-84 Harpoon missile on a P-8A Poseidon aircraft in the US 5th Fleet area of operations, January 16, 2021.

P-8As are maritime patrol aircraft but even when they are not loaded with anti-ship missiles or toperdos, they carry a wide array of sensors that give the aircraft the ability to operate in the ISR (Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance) battlespace. Here’s what we have already explained in a previous article here at The Aviationist:

[…] the P-8s are multi-mission platforms that can gather valuable intelligence using a wide array of sensors. Among these, an Advanced Airborne Sensor (a dual-sided AESA radar that can offer 360-degree scanning on targets on land or coastal areas, and which has potential applications as a jamming or even cyberwarfare platform according to Northrop Grumman); an APY-10 multi-mode synthetic aperture radar; an MX-20 electro-optical/infrared turret for shorter-range search; and an ALQ-240 Electronic Support Measure (ESM) suite, able to geo-locate and track enemy radar emitters. Moreover, all sensors contribute to a single fused tactical situation display, which is then shared over both military standard and internet protocol data links, allowing for seamless delivery of information amongst U.S. and coalition forces.

In that respect, the P-8A Poseidon represents a huge leap forward if compared to the P-3 Orion. For instance, the externally mounted AP/ANY-10 MTI imaging radar system (upgrade from the P-3’s Littoral Surveillance Radar System – LSRS), adds both an overland and maritime MTI capability approaching the fidelity provided by the US Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS). The significant difference with the more modern P-3s is, in particular, in the P-8’s ability to rapidly exchange and share information internally among the crew and externally among joint partners.

H/T Ryan Chan for the heads-up!

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