Wimbledon 2021 runs through July 11 – you can watch the tennis championships on ESPN

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Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic hopes to defend his men’s singles title at Wimbledon 2021.

  • The 2021 Wimbledon Championships started June 28 and will end July 11.
  • You can watch Wimbledon’s final matches live on ESPN; select matches will also stream on ESPN+.
  • Sling is the cheapest live TV service with ESPN networks; you can get your first month for $10.

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Wimbledon, the third Grand Slam tennis tournament of 2021, kicked off its annual championship on June 28. It will hold its finals on July 10 and 11. This year’s event is the first Wimbledon tournament since 2019. The coronavirus forced the 2020 event to be canceled.

You can watch the final matches live on ESPN, and select games will also stream on ESPN+.

This year’s tournament sees Novak Djokovic hoping to defend his 2019 Wimbledon men’s singles title. Djokovic faces Matteo Berrettini on July 11 in Berrettini’s first-ever grand slam final. On the women’s side, 2019 French Open champion Ashleigh Barty will face Karolína Plíšková, a 2016 US Open finalist, on July 10.

Below, we’ve broken down the full schedule for Wimbledon 2021, along with details on where you can watch the remaining rounds.

2021 Wimbledon Championships schedule

The 2021 Wimbledon Championships began on June 28. The women’s singles final will be held on July 10 and the men’s singles final will fall on July 11.

Here’s a full schedule for the remaining live Wimbledon matches on ESPN and encore presentations on ABC:

Women’s singles final, men’s doubles final, and women’s doubles final

Date Time Channel
July 10 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET ESPN
July 10 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. ET ABC (encore of singles final)

Men’s singles final and mixed doubles final

Date Time Channel
July 11 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET ESPN
July 11 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. ET ABC (encore of singles final)

Where to watch the 2021 Wimbledon Championships

You can watch most of the remaining 2021 Wimbledon Championship matches on ESPN. You can access the channel via cable/satellite and various live TV streaming services, including Sling TV, Hulu + Live TV, YouTube TV, Fubo TV, and AT&T TV.

In addition to the ESPN broadcasts, select matches will also be streamed via the ESPN+ and ESPN3 streaming services. With that said, ESPN+ will not carry live coverage of the women’s singles and doubles finals, the men’s singles and doubles finals, or the mixed doubles finals on July 10 and 11. All other finals will air on ESPN+.

Here’s a full breakdown of live TV streaming services with access to Wimbledon matches on ESPN.

Sling TV

The cheapest way to stream Wimbledon matches on ESPN is through Sling TV. Sling Orange ($35/month) offers live access to ESPN as well as ESPN2 and ESPN3. While Sling Blue ($35/month) includes access to other sports on Fox and FS1 channels, it does not have access to ESPN networks.

For a limited time, you can get your first month of Sling Orange for just $10. If you keep you plan after your first month is up, the price will go up to the regular $35 monthly rate.

TV (small)

YouTube TV

You can also catch Wimbledon with YouTube TV. The live TV streaming service offers both ESPN and ESPN2 along with other sports channels including FS1, CBS Sports Network, the MLB Network, the NFL Network, and NBA TV. YouTube TV costs $55/month for your first three months, and then $65 a month after.

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Hulu + Live TV

For $65 a month, you can get a Hulu + Live TV plan that includes Wimbledon matches via ESPN. The service also features other sports networks like CBS Sports Network and NBC Sports Network, as well as access to Hulu’s on-demand library of shows and movies. You can also bundle the live TV service with Disney Plus and ESPN+ for $73 a month.

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FuboTV

Another option to watch Wimbledon is with Fubo TV. The Starter Plan offers around 115 channels, including ESPN and ESPN2, for $65 a month. New subscribers can get a seven-day free trial.

The streaming service’s Elite Plan ($80/month) also includes access to a number of additional sports networks including FS1, NBCSN, NFL Network, BeinSports, CBS Sports Network, and more.

TV (Starter Plan) (small)

AT&T TV

AT&T TV also carries Wimbledon on its live TV streaming service via ESPN. The cheapest plan starts at $70, however, so we don’t recommend this as the best option for people who are primarily looking for an affordable way to watch the tournament.

TV (small)

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Wimbledon 2021 runs through July 11 – you can watch the tennis tournament on ESPN and ESPN2

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Roger Federer during his opening match at Wimbledon 2021
Roger Federer during his opening match at Wimbledon 2021.

  • The 2021 Wimbledon Championships started June 28 and will end July 11.
  • You can watch live Wimbledon matches on ESPN and ESPN2; select matches will also stream on ESPN+.
  • Sling is the cheapest live TV service with ESPN networks; you can get your first month for $10.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyTV (small)Monthly Subscription Service (small)

The Wimbledon Championships are back after a one-year break due to the pandemic.

Wimbledon, the third Grand Slam tennis tournament of 2021, kicked off its annual championship on June 28 and will wrap up its finals on July 11. It’s the first Wimbledon tournament since 2019 when the coronavirus forced the 2020 event to be canceled. You can watch matches live on ESPN and ESPN2, and select games will also stream on ESPN+ and ESPN3.

This year’s tournament sees Novak Djokovic hoping to defend his 2019 Wimbledon singles title. As of the second round, however, a number of popular players are already out of the running for the championship.

This includes 2019 women’s single champion Simona Halep who withdrew due to injuries prior to the tournament. Naomi Osaka took the tournament off for personal time, while veteran Rafael Nadal decided to sit out in order to prolong his career. Adrian Mannarino and tennis great Serena Williams exited the first round due to injuries on Centre Court.

Below, we’ve broken down the full schedule for Wimbledon 2021, along with details on where you can watch each round.

2021 Wimbledon Championships schedule

The 2021 Wimbledon Championships began on June 28. The first round ran through June 29, and the second round ran from June 30 to July 1. The third round begins on July 2 and concludes on July 3.

After a one-day break, the tournament will resume July 5 with the round of 16. It will conclude on July 10 with the women’s single final and July 11 with the men’s single final.

Here’s a full schedule for the remaining Wimbledon matches on ESPN and ESPN2:

Third round

Date Time Channel
July 2 6 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET ESPN
July 2 11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. ET ESPN2
July 3 8 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET ESPN
July 3 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. ET ESPN2
July 3 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. ET ESPN

Round of 16

Date Time Channel
July 5 6 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET ESPN2
July 5 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET ESPN

Women’s quarterfinals

Date Time Channel
July 6 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET ESPN
July 6 8 a.m. – 4 pm. ET ESPN2

Men’s quarterfinals

Date Time Channel
July 7 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET ESPN
July 7 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET ESPN2

Women’s semifinals

Date Time Channel
July 8 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. ET ESPN

Men’s semifinals

Date Time Channel
July 9 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. ET ESPN

Women’s single final, men’s doubles final, and women’s doubles final

Date Time Channel
July 10 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET ESPN

Men’s single final and mixed doubles final

Date Time Channel
July 11 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET ESPN

Where to watch the 2021 Wimbledon Championships

Coverage of the 2021 Wimbledon Championships is being broadcast on ESPN and ESPN2. Both channels are available via cable/satellite and various live TV streaming services, including Sling TV, Hulu + Live TV, YouTube TV, Fubo TV, and AT&T TV.

In addition to the ESPN and ESPN2 broadcasts, select matches will also be streamed via the ESPN+ and ESPN3 streaming services. That said, it’s unclear which games those platforms will choose to air throughout the tournament. ESPN+ costs $6 a month or $60 a year. You can also pair it with Disney Plus and Hulu (ad-supported) for $14 a month.

Monthly Subscription Service (small)

Here’s a full breakdown of live TV streaming services with access to Wimbledon matches on ESPN and ESPN2.

Sling TV

The cheapest way to stream Wimbledon matches on ESPN and ESPN2 is through Sling TV. Sling Orange ($35/month) offers live access to both channels as well as ESPN3. While Sling Blue ($35/month) includes access to other sports on Fox and FS1 channels, it does not have access to ESPN networks.

For a limited time, you can get your first month of Sling Orange for just $10. If you keep you plan after your first month is up, the price will go up to the regular $35 monthly rate.

TV (small)

YouTube TV

You can also catch Wimbledon with YouTube TV. The live TV streaming service offers both ESPN and ESPN2 along with other sports channels including FS1, CBS Sports Network, the MLB Network, the NFL Network, and NBA TV. YouTube TV costs $55/month for your first three months, and then $65 a month after.

TV (small)

Hulu + Live TV

For $65 a month, you can get a Hulu + Live TV plan that includes Wimbledon matches via ESPN and ESPN2. The service also features other sports networks like CBS Sports Network and NBC Sports Network, as well as access to Hulu’s on-demand library of shows and movies. You can also bundle the live TV service with Disney Plus and ESPN+ for $73 a month.

+ Live TV (small)

FuboTV

Another option to watch Wimbledon is with Fubo TV. The Starter Plan offers around 115 channels, including ESPN and ESPN2, for $65 a month. New subscribers can get a seven-day free trial.

The streaming service’s Elite Plan ($80/month) also includes access to a number of additional sports networks including FS1, NBCSN, NFL Network, BeinSports, CBS Sports Network, and more.

TV (Starter Plan) (small)

AT&T TV

AT&T TV also carries Wimbledon on its live TV streaming service via ESPN and ESPN2. The cheapest plan starts at $70, however, so we don’t recommend this as the best option for people who are primarily looking for an affordable way to watch the tournament.

TV (small)

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Naomi Osaka’s anxiety concerns make perfect sense – mental health issues in athletes are wildspread, according to experts

Naomi Osaka
Naomi Osaka withdrew from the French Open this week.

  • Naomi Osaka announced she would be withdrawing from the French Open, citing mental health reasons.
  • She initially boycotted post-match press conferences, before pulling out altogether.
  • Media attention can exacerbate anxiety and depression and “impostor syndrome,” according to experts who spoke to Insider.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Naomi Osaka withdrew from the French Open this week after saying she gets “huge waves of anxiety” when dealing with press. The 23-year-old tennis pro was fined $15,000 for skipping a post-match press conference, and then pulled out of the tournament altogether when she was threatened with expulsion.

“I get really nervous and find it stressful to always engage and give you the best answers I can,” Osaka, who is currently the number two female tennis player in the world, wrote on Instagram. “So here in Paris I was already feeling vulnerable and anxious so I thought it was better to exercise self-care and skip the press conferences.”

Osaka’s words highlight the pervasiveness of high-functioning anxiety.

Psychiatrist Dr. Leela R. Magavi, who has worked with many student and professional athletes, told Insider media attention can exacerbate insecurities in sports players, which can lead to “debilitating anxiety as athletes may feel pressured to look, speak or present a certain way.”

It can also increase the chance of developing, or worsen feelings of “imposter syndrome” – a psychological phenomenon where people doubt their skills and talents and constantly worry they will be exposed as a fraud.

“Many athletes ruminate about what they said during an interview or how they were portrayed in an article or television segment,” Magavi said. “They may replay portions of what they expressed and blame themselves for the content of their speech.”

Some athletes have told Magavi in therapy sessions they felt that one comment or statement they made could ruin their professional careers or personal lives, she said. This means some will agonize over questions they might be asked in interviews for hours, and prepare how they might respond if controversial topics are brought up.

“This anticipatory anxiety could adversely affect their processing speed and their performance during the match, game or tournament,” Magavi said. “This kind of pressure can cause demoralization and cause or exacerbate self-esteem concerns, eating disorders, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and suicidal thoughts.”

Osaka’s decision could be a turning point in what is expected from athletes

Ronald Stolberg, PhD, a licensed clinical and sports psychologist and professor at Alliant International University, told Insider Osaka’s situation may be a “watershed moment” for awareness around mental health issues in athletes.

“A young, female, international superstar being bullied by the four major events in her sport because of a mental health condition has awful optics for the tennis tour and sport in general,” he said. “This incident highlights the pressure placed on athletes to participate in press conferences right after competing in their sport.”

Interviewees in other areas of expertise have time to prepare, while tennis players have questions fired at them straight away when they are still full of adrenaline – running on a high of their success, or potentially beating themselves up for under-performing. It could be especially difficult for them if those questions focus on topics they would rather avoid, such as their dating life, finances, lawsuits, or political issues.

Scottish tennis player and former number 1 in the world, Andy Murray, for example, admitted in 2013 he would give bland post-match interview answers on purpose, so he wouldn’t have to deal with “the aftermath of any scandals.”

andy murray 6
Former world number 1 tennis player Andy Murray has been a notoriously prickly interviewee.

Psychotherapist Amy Morin, the editor-in-chief of Verywell Mind who specializes in mental strength, told Insider anxiety is most likely an evolutionary trait that has stuck with us from the early days of humanity, when we developed “fight or flight” in response to danger. It probably used to serve us well when we were faced with a predator, but the adrenaline response in modern-day life is sometimes disproportionate.

Morin said in if an athlete’s body is in a heightened state of awareness, and they’re distracted by looming worries about public speaking, it could be difficult for them to perform at their best.

Sometimes it takes just as much strength to give up on something than to force yourself to keep going

Athletes are masters of self-discipline, but this can feed into a misconception that nothing ever bothers them. Just because someone is an excellent sportsperson, doesn’t mean they will be equally skilled at delivering a talk in front of a crowd.

Morin said she is a big believer in people facing fears in life, but not when it costs them more than it’s worth. It’s about figuring out where your boundaries are and not stepping over that line if the costs are not worth it.

While a common mantra in sports is to never quit, Morin thinks we should actually give up on things far more often than we do. She said ego gets in the way sometimes and forces us to complete a task we set out to do, when it would serve us much better to throw in the towel.

“It takes courage to say to people, I’m not doing this anymore, and facing backlash from people who are going to say, ‘You’re a quitter, you gave up, you didn’t try hard enough,'” she said. “Sometimes it takes a lot more strength to quit something and then it does to keep going.”

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Tennis superstar Naomi Osaka’s decision to withdraw from the French Open has everyone talking about mental health right now

naomi osaka
Naomi Osaka.

Hello! This story is from today’s edition of Morning Brew, an awesome daily email publication read by 2.5 million next-generation leaders like you. Sign up here to get it!

This weekend, there’s been more back-and-forth than tennis fans are used to. Naomi Osaka, the highest earning female athlete in the world, dropped out of the French Open yesterday.

The backstory: Osaka announced last week that she wouldn’t be doing any press during the tournament, arguing that press conferences were bad for her and other players’ mental health.

  • On Sunday, the head honchos of tennis fined her $15k for skipping a post-match news conference, and raised the possibility of suspending her from future Grand Slam tournaments for violating her “contractual media obligations.”

Other athletes said they respected Osaka’s initial decision to avoid the press, but pointed out that answering questions in front of a hot mic is just part of the job. Tennis legend Billie Jean King said that professional athletes have a responsibility to talk to the media.

Zoom out: In her withdrawal announcement yesterday, Osaka said she needed to take some time away from the court. She acknowledged that she has been struggling with depression since winning the 2018 US Open, when she became the center of attention at 20 years old after defeating Serena Williams.

This story is from today’s edition of Morning Brew, a daily email publication. Sign up here to get it!

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