‘I got no defense’: Ted Cruz responds after viral tweet mocking California energy policies resurfaces amid Texas storm

Ted Cruz
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021, on the fifth day of the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.

  • Sen. Ted Cruz responded to online criticism over a resurfaced tweet Tuesday evening.
  • In August, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas mocked California’s “failed energy policies” on Twitter.
  • His post resurfaced Tuesday as over 3 million Texans were without electricity during a winter storm.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Sen. Ted Cruz struck a rare conciliatory tone after Twitter users lambasted the Texas senator for a resurfaced August tweet in which he mocked California’s “failed energy policies,” as millions of Texans were left without electricity due to a severe winter storm this past weekend. 

Many accused Cruz of being hypocritical for criticizing California’s power infrastructure following the wildfires and extreme heat waves that plagued the West Coast last summer, when his own state’s infrastructure is also struggling to handle inclement weather.

“I got no defense,” Cruz tweeted Tuesday, following the online critiques. “A blizzard strikes Texas & our state shuts down. Not good.”

 

In August, Cruz responded to a message from the governor’s office urging Californians to turn off unneeded lights and limit their use of appliances, saying the state was “unable to perform even basic functions of civilization, like having reliable electricity.”

He then accused President Joe Biden, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Vice President Kamala Harris of wanting to make California’s “failed energy policy the standard nationwide.”

“Hope you don’t like air conditioning!” he tweeted last year.

 

Now, Texas’ power grid has failed, as the state’s infrastructure is unequipped to handle large amounts of ice and snow and freezing temperatures. As of Tuesday evening, more than 3 million Texans were without power, according to the outage tracking site PowerOutage.us.

The power outages and rolling blackouts have affected designated warming centers and shelters. Two men were found dead this week in Texas; their deaths are believed to have been due to exposure to low temperatures.

Insider’s Charles Davis reported Tuesday that there are a number of reasons for the mass power outages across Texas, but the simplest explanation is that the extreme cold has spurred an unprecedented demand for heat, outstripping the state’s ability to provide.

According to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, as the weather has gotten worse, the capacity to generate electricity has diminished.

Despite Cruz’s concession, many were quick to point out that the senator had not actually issued an apology to Californians or the politicians he criticized in his original tweet. Some praised his honesty, while others urged the lawmaker to take legislative action to help the millions across the region affected by the freezing temperatures.

“Stay safe!” he tweeted.

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Ted Cruz defends ‘Mandalorian’ actress fired after she compared Jews in Nazi Germany to conservatives today

cruz mando 2x1
Sen. Ted Cruz and Gina Carano

  • Sen. Ted Cruz blasted Disney for firing Gina Carano from the hit “Star Wars” spinoff “The Mandalorian.”
  • Carano was sacked after she compared Jews in Nazi Germany to modern-day conservatives.
  • Republicans have increasingly inserted themselves into the so-called cancel culture debate.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas threw his support behind an actress fired by Disney after she compared Jews in Nazi Germany to contemporary American conservatives.

Gina Carano, a mixed martial artist who played the hard charging mercenary Cara Dune on “The Mandalorian,” was terminated by Lucasfilm on Wednesday after comparing modern-day Republicans to Jews persecuted during the Holocaust.

Lucasfilm is owned by Disney, where the hit “Star Wars” spinoff airs on Disney Plus.

Cruz backed Carano, a fellow Texan, in a tweet Thursday morning.

“Texan Gina Carano broke barriers in the Star Wars universe: not a princess, not a victim, not some emotionally tortured Jedi,” Cruz tweeted. “She played a woman who kicked ass & who girls looked up to. She was instrumental in making Star Wars fun again. Of course Disney canceled her.”

Republicans have increasingly inserted themselves into cultural debates over so-called cancel culture, defending those who have been sacked or otherwise faced consequences for their speech on social media.

In Carano’s case, she was dropped by both Lucasfilm and her agency UTA after she made an Instagram post comparing the oppression and mass murder of Jews in Nazi Germany to modern-day conservatives in the US.

“Jews were beaten in the streets, not by Nazi soldiers but by their neighbors…even by children,” Carano wrote in a since deleted Instagram caption.

“Because history is edited, most people today don’t realize that to get to the point where Nazi soldiers could easily round up thousands of Jews, the government first made their own neighbors hate them simply for being Jews,” she continued. “How is that any different from hating someone for their political views?”

Carano has been the subject of criticism for other incidents on social media, such as in September 2020 when she listed her gender pronouns in her Twitter bio as “boop/bop/beep,” mimicking the practice of identifying one’s gender identity to avoid misgendering. 

Fans decried the gesture as “transphobic,” and Carano did not apologize.

“Beep/bop/boop has zero to do with mocking trans people & [everything] to do with exposing the bullying mentality of the mob that has taken over the voices of many genuine causes,” Carano tweeted in her defense at the time.

Carano also pushed election fraud conspiracy theories and mocked mask wearing in other social media posts.

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Ted Cruz’s ‘Pittsburgh over Paris’ campaign shows us just how dumb the Biden years are going to be

ted cruz capitol riot
  • In response to Biden re-entering the US into the Paris climate agreement, GOP Sen. Ted Cruz has launched a “Pittsburgh over Paris” campaign.
  • Cruz says that Biden rejoining the Paris agreement will cost the citizens of Pittsburgh jobs.
  • But the idea makes no sense and Cruz is just engaging in a bad faith attempt at scoring political points.
  • This is a preview of what is to come under Biden.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Before the ink could even dry on Joe Biden’s first batch of Executive Orders as president, Republicans went back into their bag of obstructionist shenanigans.

Mitch McConnell, the leader of the GOP’s new Senate minority, criticized Biden’s day one actions, trying to cast them as a wave of radical policies. McConnell said that Biden should “remember that he does not owe his election to the far-left.”

But Biden’s actions reflected mainstream views supported by a wide swath of the American public. And his stances against “Defund the police,” unconditional student loan forgiveness, and Medicare For All make it clear Biden is – as he always said – a moderate. McConnell’s complaints are thinly veiled attempts to paint anything more liberal than hardcore GOP policies as “socialism” or “too far left.” .

Then, QAnon-friendly Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green immediately filed Articles of Impeachment. She released a five-second long announcement video stating as much. It has something to do with Ukraine, but the statement announcing the impeachment frankly didn’t make much sense.

Despite national calls for unity, it took the length of Biden’s inauguration speech before the Republicans’ returned to bad-faith strategy. 

Nowhere was this clearer than with potential 2024 GOP presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz. In response to Biden re-entering the US into the Paris climate accord, an international agreement to curb climate change, Cruz launched a campaign of his own.

It’s called “Pittsburgh over Paris” and it’s a sign of just how dumb things are going to get in the Biden era.

Read more: Biden promised a return to ‘normalcy,’ but it’s clear that’s not happening anytime soon.

Here we go again

Black and yellow, the official colors of the NFL’s Pittsburgh Steelers, and thus the unofficial colors of Pittsburgh itself, are the colors used in Ted Cruz’s latest 2024 gambit: a “Pittsburgh over Paris” bumper sticker that he’s giving away, pictured below.

EsRpSPPXYAAHDd0

Nothing says “Pittsburgh” like an image that prominently features the shape of Texas.

Cruz’s fake outrage in service of Pittsburghians is a head-scratcher. What does “Pittsburgh over Paris” even mean? Why does trying to curb the harsh effects of climate change hurt Pittsburgh? Why pick a city that has actually set ambitious goals to tackle climate change, like shifting to 100% renewable energy in City buildings by 2030?

Cruz says the Paris agreement will “destroy jobs,” presumably in Pittsburgh, but the city voted overwhelmingly for Biden – who repeatedly pledged to return to the Paris Agreement. Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto on Thursday said he agreed with Biden’s decision. County Executive Rich Fitzgerald of Allegheny, where Pittsburgh is located, blasted Cruz’s slogan.

“We’ll run what we need to do here, Senator, and keep your nose out of our business,” Fitzgerald told reporters.

Did Ted Cruz just choose Pittsburgh because it starts with the same letter as Paris? He did, didn’t he?

All of this is frustrating because Cruz doesn’t care about Pittsburgh. He made that clear when he attempted to disenfranchise the city’s biggest county, Allegheny, when he not only helped incite an insurrection to throw out their votes but also doubled down on that sentiment hours after. Instead, what Cruz is trying to do is set up a cultural foundation to run for president in 2024. For this reason, this stunt should not be taken seriously.

Cruz’s glib slogan isn’t about actual policy or concern for the workers in Pittsburgh (many of whom could probably get a steady job in green energy if the GOP actually supported investment in the industry), it’s about political opportunity. Despite their calls for unity, Republicans are gearing up for another cycle of mischief and misdeeds. So all this talk about Pittsburgh should be taken with an Allegheny-sized grain of salt. 

That’s what worries me about the next four years. Biden’s term is poised to be rife with Republican virtue-signaling. The virtue signal, or the disingenuous expression of moral fortitude, is the most used play in their playbook, which includes pretending to be concerned about the national debt despite embracing spending when they’re in charge, and calling everything to the left of Ronald Reagan “radical socialism.”

Cruz is the face of Republican virtue-signaling despite perpetually complaining about the practice. In fact, Cruz’s anti-virtue-signaling stance is a virtue signal within a virtue signal – which sounds like the plot of the lamest possible Christopher Nolan film.

It’s going to be hard for us to out-absurd the days of the Trump administration, considering the then-president made news for staring directly into the sun during a solar eclipse, among many, many other things. But given that we’ve already reached critical eye-roll levels in the first days of the Biden administration, it’s not looking like it’s going to get much better either.

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7 Democratic senators call for ethics probe into Cruz and Hawley to determine whether their electoral college objections contributed to the Capitol siege

Josh Hawley Ted Cruz
Josh Hawley is the subject of an ethics complaint from seven Democratic senators.

  • Seven Democratic senators have now called for a probe into Republican Senators Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz’s role in the Capitol siege. 
  • The Democrats filed an ethics complaint to investigate if Hawley’s and Cruz’s objections to the Electoral College vote on January 6 contributed to the violence that led to five deaths. 
  • Cruz and Hawley have previously faced criticism and pressure to resign from other lawmakers. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Seven Democratic senators have called for an ethics probe into Republican Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz over their objections to the Electoral College vote on January 6 and whether or not their actions contributed to the Capitol siege. 

The probe was requested on Thursday in an ethics complaint by Democratic Senators Sheldon Whitehouse, Ron Wyden, Tina Smith, Richard Blumenthal, Mazie Hirono, Tim Kaine, and Sherrod Brown. 

“The Senate Ethics Committee should open an investigation into the actions of Senators Hawley and Cruz, and perhaps others as the investigation may reveal, in order to protect the integrity, safety, and reputation of the Senate,” they wrote in the complaint.

They also said: “Their actions lend credence to the insurrectionists’ cause and set the stage for future violence. And both senators used their objections for political fundraising.”

The senators asked that the committee offer disciplinary recommendations “including up to expulsion or censure.”

Read more: SCOOP: Trump taps his former chief of staff and impeachment lawyers as the gatekeepers to his papers during his post-presidency

Hawley called the complaint “a flagrant abuse of the Senate ethics process and a flagrant attempt to exact partisan revenge” in a statement on Thursday. 

A Cruz spokeswoman told the Associated Press: “It is unfortunate that some congressional Democrats are disregarding President Biden’s call for unity and are instead playing political games by filing frivolous ethics complaints against their colleagues.”

On January 6, supporters of President Donald Trump breached the US Capitol and clashed with law enforcement, halting the joint session of Congress as lawmakers were debating challenges to electoral votes.

Critics, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, have called on Hawley and Cruz to resign.

Many Republicans abandoned their plans to dispute the election results following the violence, but Hawley and Cruz pushed forward in an effort that would have been futile but gained them points with Trump’s base. 

Sen. Joe Manchin previously said that the Senate should consider using the 14th Amendment to remove Cruz and Hawley. 

The 14th Amendment says that no lawmaker holding office “shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.” 

Then-President Donald Trump has also been criticized for inciting the mob. The House has since impeached Trump on a charge of inciting an insurrection. The Senate will soon hold a trial and vote on whether to convict the former president.

So far, there have been 169 people charged in the Capitol insurrection. 

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Corporate America is pausing its financial support for the 147 GOP lawmakers who challenged Biden’s victory. Here are all the S&P 500 companies who gave them money – and then stopped.

Republican Sens. Ted Cruz (center) and Josh Hawley (top) led the GOP effort to challenge Electoral College votes on January 6, which was interrupted as Trump supporters attempted to violently overturn Biden's victory.
  • S&P 500 companies gave $23 million to the 147 GOP lawmakers who contested Electoral College results.
  • After GOP efforts to overturn Biden’s victory led to violence, some companies paused their support.
  • Here’s a list of how much each corporate PAC had given and whether they’ve paused contributions.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On January 6, Congress convened a joint session to formally certify President Joseph Biden’s Electoral College victory, but it was quickly interrupted by a group of Republican objectors who argued, based on little more than conspiracy theories, that Congress shouldn’t proceed because there had been widespread election fraud.

In total, 147 Republicans – roughly 55% of the GOP lawmakers in Congress – objected to certifying the results of at least one state’s Electoral College vote.

But that long-shot effort to overturn democratic election results was itself interrupted by pro-Trump rioters who – citing the same election fraud conspiracies – stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to violently keep Trump in power, forcing members of Congress to evacuate, leaving five dead and dozens injured.

In the wake of the failed insurrection, corporate America found itself facing backlash for its extensive financial support of Trump and the lawmakers whose repeated amplification of election fraud conspiracies helped fuel the violence.

Political Action Committees backed by S&P 500 companies gave more than $23 million to the 147 GOP election objectors during the most recent campaign cycles (2020 for House members; 2016 and 2018 for senators), according to an Insider analysis of Federal Election Commission data provided by the Center for Responsive Politics.

Critics, from activists to shareholders to other executives, have argued the contributions helped those lawmakers get elected and stay in power, giving them the platform they used to undermine voters’ faith in the election (which Trump’s former top cybersecurity official called “the most secure in American history“).

Read more: Democrats are plotting the death – and rebirth – of a hamstrung Federal Election Commission now that they’ll control the White House and both chambers of Congress

But following reporting from Popular Information and other media outlets, many companies began rethinking their political contributions.

Companies’ commitments have varied widely, however.

Few have permanently blacklisted election objectors, and as Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez pointed out, the largest contributions typically happen right before, not after elections, leaving the door open for companies to resume their support once the public’s attention has turned elsewhere. Others have paused all PAC contributions, potentially allowing them to benefit from the positive PR without having to explicitly condemn – or risk alienating – more than half of the Republicans in Congress.

Still, dozens have issued public statements or internal memos announcing they will at least pause contributions while they reevaluate how they use their money to influence politics.

Here’s a list of the S&P 500 companies – some of the largest and most influential businesses in the US – how much they gave to the 147 election objectors in the latest election cycles through their corporate PACs, and whether they’ve pulled their support.

Do you work for one of these companies and have information about how they’re responding to recent events? We’d love to hear how they’re navigating the current political landscape. Contact this reporter using a non-work device via encrypted messaging app Signal ( +1 503-319-3213 ), email (tsonnemaker@insider.com), or Twitter (@TylerSonnemaker ). We can keep sources anonymous. PR pitches by email only, please. 

 

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Manchin says Senate should consider using 14th Amendment to remove Hawley and Cruz over their objections to Electoral College votes

Joe Manchin
WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 05: Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks to the press near the Senate subway following a vote in the Senate impeachment trial that acquitted President Donald Trump of all charges on February 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. After the House impeached Trump last year, the Senate voted today to acquit the President on two articles of impeachment as the trial concludes.

  • Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia said the Senate should consider removing his Republican colleagues, Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz. 
  • Manchin said the 14th Amendment should be applied after Cruz and Hawley pushed forth with efforts to dispute Electoral College votes last week. 
  • Trump supporters stormed the Capitol during a joint session to debate the electoral results, leading to the deaths of five people. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sen. Joe Manchin said the Senate should consider using the 14th Amendment to remove Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz, two Republicans who objected to the Electoral College vote last week. 

“That should be a consideration,” Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, said when asked if the 14th Amendment should be triggered during an interview with PBS’s “Firing Line.”

On January 6, supporters of President Donald Trump breached the US Capitol and clashed with law enforcement, halting the joint session of Congress as lawmakers were debating challenges to electoral votes.

Critics have called on the senators to resign and blamed them for the five deaths that occurred as a result of the siege on the Capitol. 

The House has since impeached Trump on a charge of inciting an insurrection. The Senate will soon hold a trial and vote on whether to convict the president.

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez previously said Cruz and Hawley’s support of the election challenges, which stemmed from President Donald Trump’s baseless allegations of mass voter fraud, helped inspire the mob that ransacked and destroyed the Capitol. 

“Sen. Cruz, you must accept responsibility for how your craven, self-serving actions contributed to the deaths of four people yesterday. And how you fundraised off this riot. Both you and Senator Hawley must resign. If you do not, the Senate should move for your expulsion,” Ocasio-Cortez said. 

Manchin had also previously said that the senators were at fault for the violence. 

“There’s no way they cannot be complicit in this,” he said. “That they think they can walk away and say, ‘I just exercised my right as a senator?’ Especially after we came back here and after they saw what happened.”

He added: “I don’t know how you can live with yourself right now knowing that people lost their lives.”

The 14th Amendment says that no lawmaker holding office “shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.” 

Many Republicans abandoned their plans to dispute the election results following the violence, but Hawley and Cruz pushed forward in an effort that would have been futile but gained them points with Trump’s base. 

Earlier this week, Democratic aides also told The Hill that some senators were also considering censuring Cruz and Hawley. While a censure wouldn’t remove them from office, it could seriously hurt their political aspirations. 

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‘I thought I was going to die’: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez rips GOP lawmakers, shares experience during Capitol riots on Instagram Live

AOC
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) leaves the U.S. Capitol on March 27, 2020 in Washington, DC.

  • During a candid Instagram Live on Tuesday night, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said that she had a “very close encounter,” where she thought she “was going to die,” at the Capitol as it was stormed by a violent mob on January 6.
  • In a wide-ranging commentary, Ocasio-Cortez briefly described some of the traumatizing events and added that Rep. Jamie Raskin who had lost his son days before the insurrection, was locked down with his daughter as they feared for their lives.
  • She also ripped into Republican colleagues in the House and Senate: “Ted Cruz, you do not belong in the United States Senate. Josh Hawley, you do not belong in the United States Senate, so get out.” Ocasio-Cortez said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who has been vocal about GOP colleagues facing consequences for their roles in inciting a violent mob who overtook the Capitol last week, opened up about her experience being locked down during an Instagram livestream on Tuesday.

On January 6, Ocasio-Cortez said that she experienced a “very close encounter,” where she thought she “was going to die.” Ocasio-Cortez did not disclose all of the details of what transpired for “security concerns,” but called the encounter “traumatizing.”

“I did not know if I was going to make it to the end of the day alive,” Ocasio-Cortez said. 

In her livestream, Ocasio-Cortez repeated some of the censures and calls for resignation that she and Democrat colleagues have called for, namely from Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley.

“Ted Cruz, you do not belong in the United States Senate. Josh Hawley, you do not belong in the United States Senate, so get out,” Ocasio-Cortez said. She said Hawley fist pumped the mob, moments before they stormed the Capitol and accused them of putting their political futures ahead of democracy and the safety of Americans. 

The congresswoman also called on all colleagues who supported efforts to overturn the election to step down.

“What claim will you have? That you rule over a destroyed society? That the ashes belong to you? Let me give you a sneak peek, you will never be president. You will never command the respect of this country, never,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

“And you should resign, and so should every member of congress who voted to overturn the election results because they would rather cling to power instead of respect our democracy,” she said, adding that the only viable future is the US being “a multiracial democracy,” and insisting that white nationalist violence could not be “voted away overnight,” without accountability.

On her livestream, Ocasio-Cortez said that during the insurrection, she did not feel secure in the safe room, concerned that QAnon and white nationalist adjacent colleagues knew her location and “would create opportunities to allow me to be hurt, kidnapped.” 

The congresswoman added that she was confident that the House would pass articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, and said in order to convict him, they would need to gain more support.

“Maybe you should vote to impeach him because he’s an active threat to every single American,” Ocasio-Cortez called out to GOP colleagues. “Maybe you should just do it because it’s the right thing to, instead of what you can build a freaking email list off of.” 

Expanded Coverage Module: capitol-siege-module

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‘I don’t know how you can live with yourself’: Joe Manchin slams Sens. Hawley and Cruz, who continued with election challenges after the Capitol riots

Hawley Cruz
GOP Sens. Josh Hawley of Missouri, left, and Ted Cruz of Texas, right, speak after Republicans objected to certifying the Electoral College votes from Arizona during a joint session of Congress on January 6, 2020.

  • In an interview with Politico, Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia gave a pointed rebuke of GOP Sens. Josh Hawley of Missouri and Ted Cruz of Texas in the aftermath of the US Capitol riots on Jan. 6.
  • “There’s no way they cannot be complicit in this,” he said. “That they think they can walk away and say, ‘I just exercised my right as a senator?’ Especially after we came back here and after they saw what happened.”
  • Sens. Hawley and Cruz, who have long been seen as likely 2024 GOP presidential candidates, have faced a flurry of calls to resign since the riots.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In an interview with Politico, Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia gave a pointed rebuke of GOP Sens. Josh Hawley of Missouri and Ted Cruz of Texas in the aftermath of the US Capitol riots on Jan. 6.

Manchin, a moderate, said that Hawley and Cruz backing President Donald Trump’s election grievances alleging voter fraud and leading the Senate GOP electoral challenge of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory will have serious consequences.

“There’s no way they cannot be complicit in this,” he said. “That they think they can walk away and say, ‘I just exercised my right as a senator?’ Especially after we came back here and after they saw what happened.”

He added: “I don’t know how you can live with yourself right now knowing that people lost their lives.”

Manchin, while in a secure area with other lawmakers during the siege in which five people died, said that he spoke with Hawley, Cruz, and Sens. James Lankford of Oklahoma and Steve Daines of Montana to convince them to drop their electoral objections.

Lankford and Daines chose not to go through with contesting Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College win over Trump, “when they saw the danger of what happened,” according to Manchin.

Read more: Secret Service experts are speculating in group chats about how Trump might be hauled out of the White House if he won’t budge on Inauguration Day

Once the building was cleared of rioters, Hawley and Cruz still went through with their objections to the Arizona and Pennsylvania vote counts, which both failed.

Biden’s victory was certified early in the morning on January 7.

Sens. Hawley and Cruz, who have long been seen as likely 2024 GOP presidential candidates, have faced a flurry of calls to step down. Several of their Democratic colleagues in the upper chamber, including Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Ron Wyden or Oregon, Chris Coons of Delaware, and Patty Murray of Washington, have all called for both Hawley and Cruz to resign.

Republican colleagues and possible 2024 contenders including Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and Ben Sasse of Nebraska declined to join in the election challenges.

Former GOP Sen. John Danforth, who represented Missouri in the Senate from 1976 to 1995 and was one of Hawley’s biggest champions in his 2018 Senate campaign, recently lamented his support as “the worst mistake I ever made in my life.”

Both Hawley and Cruz have refused to step down from their seats, but with the fallout from the riots still in the minds of every lawmaker on Capitol Hill, their effectiveness in the Senate will likely be an open question going forward.

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‘It’s not a f—ing game’: Democratic lawmaker gives the sternest of rebukes against Ted Cruz after deadly Capitol Hill siege

Brendan Boyle
Democratic Rep. Brendan Boyle of Philadelphia speaks as the House debates the objection to confirm the Electoral College vote from Pennsylvania, at the US Capitol, January 7, 2021.

  • Rep. Brendan Boyle of Philadelphia, in what is most likely the harshest public words yet by a Democrat, rebuked Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.
  • Boyle told Cruz to “end this s—” of playing politics after the deadly riots on Capitol Hill.
  • “What the f— is it going to take for you to end this s—,” Boyle tweeted. “How many more 20-yr old staffers do you want to be terrorized and hiding in our offices?”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Brendan Boyle of Philadelphia, in what is most likely the harshest public words yet by a Democrat, rebuked a Senate colleague and told him to “end this s—” of playing politics after the deadly riots on Capitol Hill.

Boyle’s response was prompted after President-elect Joe Biden blamed President Donald Trump, as well as Cruz and other Senate Republicans, of inciting the siege on Capitol Hill that killed at least five people, including a US Capitol Police officer.

“If he’s the only one saying it, that’s one thing,” Biden said, referring to Trump, to the press after a speech on Friday. “But the acolytes that follow him, like Cruz and others, they are as responsible as he is.”

“I think the American public has a real good clear look at who they are,” Biden added. “They’re part of the big lie.”

Biden went on to draw a comparison between Cruz’s behavior to that of Joseph Goebbels, a Nazi propagandist during World War II. “Big lie” is a reference to a propaganda technique employed by the Nazis in order to sow doubt and confusion.

Cruz, as well as other Republicans like Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, have been criticized for objecting to a congressional procedure to count the 2020 presidential race’s Electoral College votes. Democrats and Republicans have alleged that their claims gave credence to conspiracy theories that have repeatedly been struck down by federal judges, and that they were predicated on debunked theories of widespread voter fraud.

Their objections, which took place on the same day as the Capitol Hill siege on Wednesday, promoted the discontent and political divide, Democrats alleged. Democratic lawmakers accused Cruz and Hawley of “treasonous” behavior, with some calling for them to be censured or expelled.

Cruz took offense to Biden’s comparison and described it on Twitter as “really sad.”

“At a time of deep national division, President-elect Biden’s choice to call his political opponents literal Nazis does nothing to bring us together or promote healing,” Cruz said. “This kind of vicious partisan rhetoric only tears our country apart.”

Cruz condemned the attacks as a “despicable act of terrorism,” but alleged Democrats were taking advantage of the moment. Cruz eventually voted to sustain his objections, which were overwhelmingly struck down by his Senate colleagues.

“No one should be surprised to see Democrats playing politics and to see them try to attack strong conservative leaders,” Cruz said during a radio interview. “That’s something Democrats have done for a long time. I do think it’s really cynical for them to be trying to take advantage of what was a tragic event that occurred yesterday in Washington – the terrorist attack on the Capitol.”

Boyle responded to Cruz on Twitter, telling him to “just stop.”

“You know better. I know you know better,” Boyle tweeted. “It’s not a f—— game. Five people were killed.”

“What the f— is it going to take for you to end this s—,” Boyle added. “How many more 20-yr old staffers do you want to be terrorized and hiding in our offices?”

Neither Boyle’s nor Cruz’s offices responded to a request for comment on Friday evening.

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‘Traitors to the country’: Military veterans in Congress accuse Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley of helping incite the fatal violence on Capitol Hill

ted cruz resign
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.

  • Democratic lawmakers who’ve served in the US military condemned their Republican colleagues and President Donald Trump as “treasonous.”
  • GOP Senators Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley “did not break in with the rioters, and neither did Donald Trump, but their words broke the barriers of civility that have really kept the country together for hundreds of years,” Democratic Rep. Ruben Gallego told MSNBC.
  • “I’ve heard one woman say that this was the most frightening day of her life,” Rep. Seth Moulton, a former Marine, told Insider. “This is not what members of Congress signed up to do. It’s what I expected as a Marine, but not as a member of Congress.”
  • Representatives for Hawley did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Cruz’s office referred to the statements he made denouncing the violent attacks on Capitol Hill, and alleging Democrats were playing politics.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Democratic lawmakers with military backgrounds quickly condemned their Republican colleagues and President Donald Trump as “treasonous,” and accused them of inciting the fatal violence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

But their statements directed at a pair of Senate Republicans went beyond the usual political brinksmanship, particularly after a pro-Trump mob broke into the offices of lawmakers and the chambers of Congress.

At least four people died following the riots, including one person who was shot. Over a dozen D.C. Metropolitan Police officers were injured.

“What is our country coming to,” Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts, a former Marine Corps infantry officer, told Insider. “What is our country coming to, that the greatest democracy the world has ever seen, is under assault from within and inspired by the president of the United States.”

seth moulton (david)
Seth Moulton in Iraq.

Moulton recounted being hurried off to a secure room with dozens of other lawmakers by Capitol Hill’s security team. Dramatic images of the incident showed lawmakers taking cover and assisting others during the hours-long siege.

“To be honest, this was nothing compared to what we saw in Iraq, but for many of my colleagues it was the worst thing they’ve seen,” Moulton added. “I’ve heard one woman say that this was the most frightening day of her life. This is not what members of Congress signed up to do. It’s what I expected as a Marine, but not as a member of Congress.”

Hours before the violence, Trump hosted an event near the White House to galvanize supporters to “never concede” in disputing the results of the presidential election. A joint session of Congress was in session on the same day to count the 2020 presidential race’s Electoral College votes.

Republican lawmakers from both chambers formally objected to the counting, raising debunked theories of widespread voter fraud and lending credence to conspiracy theories that have repeatedly been struck down by federal judges.

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President Donald Trump campaigns with Sen. Josh Hawley of Kansas.

Of note was Sens. Josh Hawley of Kansas, who appeared to raise his fist in support of the rioters on Wednesday; and Ted Cruz of Texas. Both senators were accused of showboating and fueling statements in an effort to advance their political profile. Sen. Hawley’s office also reportedly sent a fundraising email mentioning his objection as the congressional session was underway.

Moulton told Insider he “absolutely” believes Hawley and Cruz shared the blame for the violence.

“These are domestic terrorists attempting a coup who were incited and supported by lawless Republicans lawmakers,” Moulton said. “I think they should be censured because we need to make it clear to future lawmakers and future generations of Americans that you will not incite violence against the United States of America. That’s treasonous.”

Democratic Rep. Ruben Gallego of Arizona, another Marine who deployed to Iraq, also had choice words and accused the two Republicans of inciting violence. Gallego reportedly helped other lawmakers put on their gas masks and gave instructions, as well as sheltering news reporters into his office.

“We have a president and we have senators that incite this that are just as bad as those who broke in,” Gallego said to MSNBC on Wednesday. “Cruz and Hawley did not break in with the rioters, and neither did Donald Trump, but their words broke the barriers of civility that have really kept the country together for hundreds of years. And they’re just as responsible and they should be ashamed.”

“The names of Cruz and Hawley should go down in history next to people like Benedict Arnold and Donald Trump,” Gallego added. “They are just traitors to the country and traitors to the Constitution.”

Representatives for Hawley did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Cruz’s office referred to the statements he made denouncing the violent attacks on Capitol Hill, and alleging Democrats were merely playing politics.

“The attack at the Capitol was a despicable act of terrorism and a shocking assault on our democratic system,” Cruz said. “The Department of Justice should vigorously prosecute everyone who was involved in these brazen acts of violence.”

“No one should be surprised to see Democrats playing politics and to see them try to attack strong conservative leaders,” Cruz said during a radio interview. “That’s something Democrats have done for a long time. I do think it’s really cynical for them to be trying to take advantage of what was a tragic event that occurred yesterday in Washington – the terrorist attack on the Capitol.”

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Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado comforts Rep. Susan Wild of Pennsylvania, while taking cover as protesters disrupt the joint session of Congress to certify the Electoral College vote, January 6, 2021.

Like Gallego, other lawmakers with combat experience sprung to action to assist during the chaos. Democratic Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado, a former US Army Ranger, was pictured comforting Democratic Rep. Susan Wild of Pennsylvania during the siege inside the House chamber.

“I called my wife,” Crow told the Rolling Stone. “I told her I loved her and told the kids I loved them and told my wife I might have to fight my way out. “

“I immediately got into Ranger mode, as I say,” Crow reportedly added. “I’m going to do everything I can, I’m going to take as much action as I can. I did a double-check of all the doors, made sure they were locked. Escorted the more senior members away from the doors, moving them into a defensive position. Asked folks to take off their member pins so that if the mobs break down the doors, the members would be harder to identify. I took a pen out of my pocket to possibly use as a weapon.”

Crow also tweeted of the incident: “It didn’t need to be this way. Enablers of Donald Trump led us to this point.”

After reconvening, both Hawley and Cruz voted to sustain their objection. The Senate ultimately voted overwhelmingly 93-6 against the objection of Arizona’s electoral vote; as well as 92-7 against the objection of Pennsylvania’s.

Read the original article on Business Insider