Mark Zuckerberg is no astronaut, so he’s rocketing Facebook into a virtual universe instead

mark zuckerberg oculus
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on stage at an Oculus developers conference in 2016.

  • Mark Zuckerberg said this week that Facebook will transform into a metaverse company.
  • Metaverse is the next iteration of the internet and will expand on the physical and digital worlds.
  • It’s Zuckerberg’s own futuristic mission after his peers catapulted to the edge of space.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Richard Branson rocketed to the edge of space. So did Jeff Bezos just days later. Elon Musk has grand plans for interplanetary life, too.

But Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is one tech billionaire that’s not following suit. Instead, he unveiled his own futuristic ambitions recently: positioning his company as the center of the so-called metaverse.

Think of it as what will come after the internet. It’s a virtual universe that will straddle the physical and digital worlds, allowing people to live and interact in real-time in both of them.

Digiday gave a good example: you wouldn’t have different social media profiles across various platforms. You would instead automatically be yourself when you log onto Twitter, Instagram, and other online spaces.

The metaverse concept has been somewhat niche, presiding largely in the gaming world, until Zuckerberg pushed it into the limelight this week in an interview with The Verge.

He said Facebook would evolve from a social media company into a “metaverse company.” And Facebook’s Andrew Bosworth said Monday that the company is even building out a designated executive team to oversee progress towards the metaverse vision. It’ll exist within Facebook’s virtual reality branch.

Facebook’s VR and AR technology can currently “teleport you into a room with another person, regardless of physical distance, or to new virtual worlds and experiences,” Bosworth said in the Facebook post. “But to achieve our full vision of the Metaverse, we also need to build the connective tissue between these spaces — so you can remove the limitations of physics and move between them with the same ease as moving from one room in your home to the next.”

Zuckerberg said he’s banking on the transition to occur over the course of the next five years or so.

So he may not achieve astronaut status, but then again, neither did Bezos technically. He may only qualify for “honorary” astronaut wings, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

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How JFK’s nephew became one of Facebook’s most prolific anti-vax misinformation spreaders

robert f kennedy jr
Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is the nephew of former President John F. Kennedy. He’s also one of 12 people found to be spreading the most misinformation online.

  • Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is one of the “disinformation dozen” spreading vaccine misinformation online.
  • He cemented himself as a prominent anti-vaxxer long before the pandemic.
  • Here’s how the nephew of former President John F. Kennedy became an online anti-vax influencer.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A recent report found that most COVID-19 disinformation online is spread by just 12 people – and one of them is the nephew of former President John F. Kennedy.

Robert F Kennedy Jr. cemented himself as a prominent anti-vaccine advocate well before the pandemic. But his rhetoric took on a whole new meaning when the COVID-19 pandemic took over the world in March 2020.

Here’s how 67-year-old Kennedy, who is also the son of former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, became one of the “disinformation dozen” spreading COVID-19 conspiracy theories online.

From government law student to Fauci foe and anti-vaxxer

robert f kennedy jr
Kennedy in 2017.

Kennedy graduated from Harvard, attended law school at the University of Virginia, and then earned his master’s in environmental law at Pace University, according to Vanity Fair.

He gained a reputation for defending Indigenous groups and fighting against the use of fossil fuels , all while rubbing shoulders with Hollywood elite at climate change awareness events and other social functions.

But he veered into anti-vax circles in the 1990s when he co-founded the Food Allergy Initiative. He started entertaining theories that some allergies were linked to vaccines given to children. He edited and wrote multiple books about what he said was inadequate vaccine safety, including “Vaccine Villains: What the American Public Should Know About the Industry.”

He founded the World Mercury Project in 2016, which became the Children’s Health Defense in 2018, an activist organization devoted to anti-vaccine initiatives. The group alleges, among other things, that administering some vaccines in children can cause conditions such as autism and cancer.

And Kennedy will release a new book this fall entitled “The Real Anthony Fauci: Bill Gates, Big Pharma, and the Global War on Democracy and Public Health.”

fauci
Dr. Anthony Fauci, on June 30, 2020

That’s where Facebook comes in.

The book explores what Kennedy describes as Fauci’s botched handling of the pandemic and how he staged an “assault on our First Amendment guarantee of free speech.”

“Fauci’s Silicon Valley and media allies dutifully censored criticism of his policies on mainstream social media and collaborated to muzzle any medical information about therapies and treatments that might end the pandemic and compete with vaccines,” it alleges.

Internet platforms have attempted to crack down on vaccine misinformation during the pandemic, prompting allegations of censorship on the right.

The book also alleges that Fauci and Gates “worked together to finance and promote the very gain-of-function experiments in Wuhan that may have released the COVID-19 pathogen.”

Kennedy told Biden that ‘vaccines cause injuries and death’

biden vaccine
President Joe Biden receives a coronavirus vaccine.

In a March letter addressed to President Joe Biden, Kennedy alleged that vaccines could be causing injuries and deaths and implored the US to identify more of such cases.

He also alleged that the CDC was brushing cases under the rug and was working “with the media and social media sites to remove and censor these reports.”

Biden said in mid-July that Facebook and other online platforms are “killing people” by allowing health misinformation to proliferate.

He was kicked off Instagram for posting ‘debunked claims’

robert f kennedy jr
Kennedy in 2016.

Kennedy took many of these viewpoints to his social media accounts.

Facebook said in February that it removed Kennedy’s account because he was “repeatedly sharing debunked claims about the coronavirus or vaccines.”

But Kennedy is still very active on other sites, like Twitter for example.

He regularly shares posts from his anti-vax organization, such as one on Wednesday featuring a scientist who purported to have found evidence between COVID vaccines and neurodegenerative disorders.

Others in the Kennedy bloodline notably don’t share his stance on vaccines.

In a 2019, Kennedy’s siblings – Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Joseph P Kennedy II – and niece – Maeve Kenned McKean – penned an essay in Politico entitled “RFK Jr. is Our Brother and Uncle. He’s Tragically Wrong About Vaccines.”

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This is 996 culture, a grueling 72-hour work week popular in China that’s been criticized for ruining work-life balance

man walks past alibaba logo at headquarters
Alibaba, a Chinese e-commerce giant, is one of many companies criticized for its grueling work culture.

  • The 996 schedule compels employees to work from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week.
  • The schedule is widespread in China, especially among tech companies in China’s Silicon Valley.
  • Chinese workers have blasted the policy on social media for ruining their personal lives.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The brutal work schedule known as the “996” has been blamed for making work-life balance impossible, causing unnecessary stress, and even killing workers at some of China’s leading tech companies.

This unwritten rule of many Chinese workplaces has been championed by tech leaders and denounced by workers and activists for years. Here’s what you need to know about the infamous “996.”

What is 996 work culture?

The “996,” a work schedule which encourages or coerces employees to work from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week, is common among Chinese tech companies and startups. Though the practice is technically prohibited by Chinese law, many companies still enforce the hours informally or formally.

Working overtime is now normal,” a blogger on Weibo, a Chinese social media platform similar to Twitter, said. “What’s even more scary is that so many young people are already used to this and don’t dare to protest because they know even if they do, it will be useless.”

‘We can’t help but ask – is it really worth it to exchange our lives for money’? How does 996 affect Chinese workers?

For young tech workers, the grinding work schedule means more burnout and less time for basics like sleep, sex, or a personal life, according to the South China Morning Post.

An activist group created the project “996.ICU” on Github in early 2019, where critics listed examples of unreasonable overtime work and blacklisted companies accused of engaging in the practice and whitelisted companies with more humane hours, Reuters reported.

Furor over the “996” was reignited in December, 2019, after a 22-year-old working at Pinduoduo, an e-commerce company, collapsed and died on the streets of Urumqi, China, after leaving work at 1:30 a.m. The woman was seen in China as another victim of an extreme culture of overworking, and outrage flared on Chinese social media.

“This way of working is very harmful for the human body, we’ve heard a lot of news about deaths from working overtime in recent years, but this deformed overtime system still prevails,” one blogger said. “We can’t help but ask – is it really worth it to exchange our lives for money?”

Who supports this schedule?

Well, many Chinese tech CEOs for one.

Alibaba CEO Jack Ma, who rose from poverty to become one of China’s richest men, is one of the most fervent supporters of 996, calling the hectic schedule a “huge blessing” for young professionals. “If you find a job you like, the 996 problem does not exist,” he said. “If you’re not passionate about it, every minute of going to work is a torment.”

Richard Liu, CEO of Chinese ecommerce company JD.com, agreed with Ma’s statement, stating on his WeChat feed that “slackers aren’t my brothers!

But it’s not just Chinese leaders who defend long hours – Elon Musk believes that people looking to make an impact on the world should work 80 to 100 hours a week, saying “nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week.”

Is this policy actually effective?

Research has shown that shorter work weeks are often more productive and that people struggle to concentrate on their tasks for long hours. Sleep deprivation has also been linked to cancer, weight gain and memory problems.

Do you have a 996 work culture story to share? Email the reporter of this story from a non-work email at hschlitz@insider.com

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Reddit’s Alexis Ohanian compared Facebook to Marvel villain Thanos, saying its growth is ‘inevitable’ unless the government intervenes

alexis ohanian
Alexis Ohanian.

  • Alexis Ohanian said Facebook’s explosive growth is “inevitable” unless lawmakers intervene.
  • The Reddit founder said government intervention is the only thing to “stop the march” of big tech firms.
  • Regulatory talk is growing louder in Washington as scrutiny mounts on the tech industry.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian said the only thing that can reel in tech’s biggest players is the US government.

Ohanian told the Wharton Business Daily’s Dan Leony that “it is now very obvious that there isn’t going to be anything to stop the march of” Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, and Google without government intervention.

He likened Facebook specifically to the Marvel villain Thanos, who declares in the final installments of the franchise that he is “inevitable” in his mission to wipe out half the universe.

“Talk about Thanos saying, ‘I’m inevitable,’ like Facebook growing to a two trillion-dollar company is inevitable, short of government intervention,” Ohanian said. Facebook hit a $1 trillion valuation in late June after a judge tossed out lawsuits filed by the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general.

The venture capitalist also said he hopes the conversations among lawmakers in regard to tech regulation are “well-informed” about technology since he said heavier oversight, if carried out incorrectly, could stifle innovation.

Chatter about finally regulating the lucrative tech world has grown louder in the past year. Lawmakers investigated the Big Four over online competition and concluded last fall that they are “the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons.”

Big tech companies are also facing lawsuits from the FTC, state attorneys general, and agencies across the pond. The FTC, which is empowered to enforce antitrust laws, is now led by a vocal big tech critic. And Congress unveiled a package of antitrust bills in June intended to keep tech firms from growing too powerful.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Big Tech knows there’s a housing crisis. Apple and Amazon donate millions of dollars to affordable housing where they operate.

apple campus silicon valley
The Apple Campus 2 is seen under construction in Cupertino, California in this aerial photo taken January 13, 2017.

  • Apple said Wednesday it has poured $1 billion into affordable housing efforts in California.
  • Amazon similarly said Tuesday it’s giving $40 million worth of unused land for Virginia to build new homes.
  • The donations signal that Big Tech is aware of housing crises in areas where it operates.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Big Tech knows there’s a housing crisis – if the millions of dollars they’re donating to affordable housing is any indication.

Apple said on Wednesday that it has poured $1 billion into housing development efforts in Northern California, including the San Francisco Bay Area, as part of a broader $2.5 billion initiative that it kicked off in late 2019.

And Amazon said on Tuesday that it’s giving Virginia’s Arlington County $40 million worth of unused land to build 550 new, affordable housing units. The e-commerce giant is currently constructing its second headquarters in the county.

Big Tech has long come under fire for moving into communities whose members are later priced out by companies’ high-earning workers. And although subsequent housing crises are caused by a number of factors, the tech companies contribute to many of those issues.

The Bay Area specifically is notorious for its sky-high rent and unsustainable housing problems. San Francisco has some of the highest rent in the country, a reality that in part has to do with the city’s zoning restrictions.

But the city’s inclusion in Silicon Valley is also a factor as high-earning tech workers grabbed available housing, pricing lower-income locals out. Even some of those tech employees struggle with the region’s high cost of living.

In Austin, Texas, Tesla Energy has teamed up with Brookfield Asset Management and the real-estate developer Dacra to develop a master-planned community. The move marks the first formal neighborhood Tesla is building from the ground up.

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A Google privacy engineer says he quit over ‘constant gaslighting’ following the firing of two AI experts

Timnit Gebru Sundar Pichai
AI researcher Timnit Gebru (left) and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

  • A Google privacy engineer said he quit after the company controversially fired two AI ethicists.
  • One of them, Timnit Gebru, was fired in December, prompting widespread employee outrage.
  • The engineer, Damien Desfontaines, has been with the company since 2014, per his LinkedIn profile.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A senior privacy software engineer at Google said he quit the tech firm, citing “constant gaslighting” following its prior dismissals of two AI experts, including the high-profile case of Timnit Gebru.

Damien Desfontaines, who goes by TedOnPrivacy on Twitter, announced the news Thursday.

“Personal news! Today’s my last day at Google. My “shields down” moment was the firing of @timnitGebru, then @mmitchell_ai, and all the constant gaslighting since then. I will not be taking further questions at this time,” he said, before adding a smiley face emoji.

Gebru, the AI ethicist who said Google fired her in December, commented on his post and said, “Thank you so much for your support and I hope your future is full of being at environments that value and nurture you.”

According to his LinkedIn profile, Desfontaines has been with Google since 2014 and is based in Zurich, Switzerland. Insider has reached out to him and Google for comment.

Google is still grappling with employee outrage following what Gebru said was her firing from the company. Google maintains that Gebru was not fired and that she instead resigned. A group of Google employees pushed back on that claim in a December blog post, saying she did not resign.

Gebru, a renowned researcher in the ethics space, said she was discussing her potential resignation with Google amid negotiations regarding a research paper of hers, which found potential bias in certain models. Instead of responding to the conditions she set, Gebru said Google bypassed her and let her direct reports know that she had already resigned.

Google fired another ethicist that Desfontaines referenced, Margaret Mitchell, just two months later in February because of what the company said were “multiple violations” of its rules.

At the time, a Google spokesperson said those violations included “the exfiltration of confidential business-sensitive documents and private data of other employees.”

Mitchell told Insider in February that she had tried to use her position to “raise concerns to Google about race and gender inequity, and to speak up about Google’s deeply problematic firing of Dr. Gebru.”

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Jeff Bezos will officially step down on Monday. Here are the top 5 things to know about his replacement Andy Jassy.

andy jassy amazon
Andy Jassy.

  • Jeff Bezos will step down from his role as Amazon CEO on Monday.
  • Bezos will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of AWS.
  • He has been at Amazon for 24 years and is one of the highest-paid executives at the company.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced earlier this year that he was stepping down as the tech giant’s chief executive officer.

Bezos told shareholders that he will officially leave the position on July 5, a “sentimental” date – the same day that Amazon was incorporated in 1994.

In a letter to employees, Bezos said he will transition to executive chairman and will focus on “new products and early initiatives” in the third quarter.

He will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud platform.

Here are 5 things to know about the new CEO, based on what over a dozen current and former employees told Insider in interviews published in January.

Jassy has been at Amazon for about as long as Bezos, 24 years to be exact.

Jassy joined Amazon in 1997, the same year the company went public. The 53-year-old built AWS from the ground up within the past two decades and became CEO of the cloud platform in 2016. Analyst Dan Ives described him to Insider in a previous interview as “one of the most powerful leaders not just within the cloud and tech sector but in the world of business.”

Jassy is a close confidant of Bezos.

Jassy served as a so-called “shadow” advisor to Bezos at one point, joining the chief executive in high-level meetings. In his letter to staff announcing his exit as CEO, Bezos said Jassy will be an “outstanding leader.”

Jassy is one of the highest-paid executives at Amazon.

He has raked in a total of more than $20 million within the past three years. In 2016 alone, Jassy earned over $36 million while Bezos made about $1.7 million in total, according to CNBC.

Jassy was reportedly considered for the role of CEO at Microsoft and Uber.

Ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer approached Jassy at one point about replacing him as chief executive of the company, a person familiar with the discussion told Insider’s Ashley Stewart and Eugene Kim. There was also a rumor that Jassy was considered to take over as Uber CEO after Travis Kalanick stepped down in 2017.

He’s outspoken in regard to political and social issues.

Jassy has spoken out against the police killings of Black Americans and in favor of court decisions to make it illegal to discriminate against members of the LGBTQ community, among other calls to action. Jassy has also spoken out against former President Donald Trump’s contempt for Amazon and helmed AWS amid the company’s decision to ban Parler, a social-media app popular among the far-right.

Read what more than a dozen current and former Amazon employees told Insider about what it’s like to work for Jassy.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Facebook failed to protect against teen sex trafficking, court rules, paving the way for tech companies to be held liable when they’re used for criminal activity

mark zuckerberg facebook
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in Washington D.C. on Oct. 23, 2019

  • The Texas Supreme Court ruled that Facebook can be held liable for sex trafficking recruitment.
  • Facebook argued that it should not be held liable because it is shielded by Section 230.
  • A recent report found most online recruitment in active sex trafficking cases in 2020 was on Facebook.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday that Facebook can be held liable for sex traffickers that use its platform to recruit and prey on child victims.

As the Houston Chronicle reported, the ruling followed three local lawsuits involving teenage victims who had met their traffickers through Facebook’s messaging tools. The plaintiffs said Facebook was negligent and did not attempt to key sex trafficking off its technology.

Facebook has argued that it is shielded by the protections of Section 230 – part of an internet law that states online platforms are not liable for what people post on their services – and should therefore not be held responsible for what is posted on its platform.

But the Texas Supreme Court said Section 230 doesn’t mean Facebook can operate as a “lawless no-man’s-land,” as the Chronicle reported.

“Holding internet platforms accountable for the words or actions of their users is one thing, and the federal precedent uniformly dictates that section 230 does not allow it,” the majority of the court said, per the Chronicle. “Holding internet platforms accountable for their own misdeeds is quite another thing. This is particularly the case for human trafficking.”

Facebook did not immediately respond to Insider’s request or comment.

Section 230 has become the focus of conversations surrounding moderation on internet platforms. Many have called for tech companies to be treated as publishers, since news outlets are alternatively held liable for what they post online.

Online recruitment for sex trafficking victims has surged over the years, and a recent report from the Human Trafficking Institute found that most online recruitment in active cases last year occurred on Facebook.

“The internet has become the dominant tool that traffickers use to recruit victims, and they often recruit them on a number of very common social networking websites,” Human Trafficking Institute CEO Victor Boutros told CBS News earlier this month. “Facebook overwhelmingly is used by traffickers to recruit victims in active sex trafficking cases.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Some Apple suppliers in China are reportedly saying they won’t hire minorities like Uyghur Muslims in job postings

apple tim cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook on November 20, 2019.

  • The Information viewed jobs listings from Apple suppliers in China explicitly saying Uyghurs are excluded.
  • The outlet previously reported some Apple suppliers were linked to suspected forced labor of the minority group.
  • Human rights activists have condemned China for its persecution and detainment of 1 million Uyghurs.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Some Apple suppliers in China aren’t accepting minority job applicants and are explicitly saying members of marginalized groups should not apply, according to a Tuesday report by The Information.

The news site found discriminatory online job listings from companies that produce parts for iPhones, iPads, and AirPods, like circuit boards, iPhone glass, data cables, and camera lenses. Foxconn Technology is one of the companies whose ads were found.

One job listing in April from the company Biel Crystal, which makes iPhone glass, read: “Tibetans, Uyghurs, Hui, Yi, Dongxiang from Tibet or Xinjiang regions aren’t accepted,” per the report. Another from Cathay Tat Ming, which manufactures iPhone parts, read that only “minorities without dietary restrictions are accepted (Uyghurs excluded).”

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Apple relies heavily on its supply chain in China, and The Information reported that the more than 30 Apple suppliers that posted the discriminatory job listings collectively employ more than 1 million people. The outlet also noted that by outsourcing its production to suppliers in China, it’s difficult for Apple to monitor potential violations in company code.

The news comes after the outlet previously reported some Apple suppliers were linked to suspected forced labor of Uyghur Muslims and other minority groups from the Xinjiang region. A March 2020 report from the Australian Strategic Policy Institute also found connections between Apple suppliers and forced Uyghur labor.

“The real irony here is that these companies discriminate against religious and ethnic minorities while utilizing forced labor from Xinjiang,” Katie Paul, director of the Tech Transparency Project, told The Information.

Apple has long denied that its suppliers use forced Uyghur labor.

Human Rights Watch estimates 1 million Uyghur Muslims are being persecuted in China. The country has detained the marginalized community in internment camps and has forced them to abandon their culture for Chinese customs, like the Mandarin language.

China has pushed back on the characterization of the camps, claiming they are for “reeducation” purposes. The ruling party has called Uyghur Muslims terrorists and religious extremists.

If they refuse to participate in the work camps, they are sent to jail. Reports have surfaced of torture at these camps, including one woman who said she witnessed a gang rape and medical experiments on the prisoners while she was teaching Chinese propaganda in the camps. The government has also been accused of sterilizing Uyghur women.

International human rights advocates and countries around the world have condemned China’s actions. Human Rights Watch said in April that China is committing “crimes against humanity” through its prison centers for Uyghurs.

President Joe Biden earlier this month expanded on an executive order prohibiting US investment into some Chinese companies whose surveillance technology has been used against Uyghur Muslims.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will officially step down on July 5. Here are the top 5 things to know about his replacement, Andy Jassy.

andy jassy amazon
Andy Jassy.

  • Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will step down on July 5, the same date Amazon was incorporated in 1994.
  • Bezos will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of AWS.
  • He has been at Amazon for 24 years and is one of the highest-paid executives at the company.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced earlier this year that he was stepping down as the tech giant’s chief executive officer.

And on Wednesday, Bezos told shareholders that he will officially leave the position on July 5, a “sentimental” date – the same day that Amazon was incorporated in 1994.

In a letter to employees, Bezos said he will transition to executive chairman and will focus on “new products and early initiatives” in the third quarter.

He will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud platform.

Here are 5 things to know about the new CEO, based on what over a dozen current and former employees told Insider in interviews published in January.

Jassy has been at Amazon for about as long as Bezos has, 24 years to be exact.

Jassy joined Amazon in 1997, the same year the company went public. The 53-year-old built AWS from the ground up within the past two decades and became CEO of the cloud platform in 2016. Analyst Dan Ives described him to Insider in a previous interview as “one of the most powerful leaders not just within the cloud and tech sector but in the world of business.”

Jassy is a close confidant of Bezos.

Jassy served as a so-called “shadow” advisor to Bezos at one point, joining the chief executive in high-level meetings. In his letter to staff announcing his exit as CEO, Bezos said Jassy will be an “outstanding leader.”

Jassy is one of the highest-paid executives at Amazon.

He has raked in a total of more than $20 million within the past three years. In 2016 alone, Jassy earned over $36 million while Bezos made about $1.7 million in total, according to CNBC.

Jassy was reportedly considered for the role of CEO at Microsoft and Uber.

Ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer approached Jassy at one point about replacing him as chief executive of the company, a person familiar with the discussion told Insider’s Ashley Stewart and Eugene Kim. There was also a rumor that Jassy was considered to take over as Uber CEO after Travis Kalanick stepped down in 2017.

He’s outspoken in regard to political and social issues.

Jassy has spoken out against the police killings of Black Americans and in favor of court decisions to make it illegal to discriminate against members of the LGBTQ community, among other calls to action. Jassy has also spoken out against former President Donald Trump’s contempt for Amazon and helmed AWS amid the company’s decision to ban Parler, a social-media app popular among the far-right.

Read what over a dozen current and former Amazon employees told Insider about what it’s like to work for Jassy.

Read the original article on Business Insider