Family office launch guide: who to know when you’re opening or hiring for a family office

Todd Angkatavanich, Natasha Pearl, Bill Bjiesse, and Lisa Featherngill on a pink background.
Todd Angkatavanich, Natasha Pearl, Bill Bjiesse, and Lisa Featherngill.

  • As global wealth surges, more people want to start family offices to take control of their finances.
  • Insider spoke to more than a dozen industry insiders to compile a list of 21 must-know experts.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Whether they’re rags-to-riches entrepreneurs or old-money heirs, many of the wealthy have created their own family offices to oversee their assets.

Citi estimates that as many as 15,000 family offices have been created in the past two decades alone.

Insider spoke with more than a dozen family-office professionals to find out who the wealthy go to when deciding to set up their own shops. Whether they’re lawyers or wealth managers, here are 21 must-know family-office experts.

You can read our full story if you’re an Insider subscriber: These are the 21 advisors, accountants, and lawyers to know if you’re thinking about starting your own family office

Insider also rounded up some of the must-know executive recruiters in the space, as hiring top talent is key to maintaining wealth that lasts for generations.

Meet 8 top recruiters scouting talent for family offices as the secretive wealth managers to the world’s richest look to supercharge their investing prowess

Read the original article on Business Insider

Check out 9 pitch decks that fintechs looking to disrupt investing, banking, and credit scores used to raise millions

dollar bills money
Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.

Fintech VC funding hit a fresh quarterly record of $22.8 billion in the first three months of 2021, according to CB Insights data. While mega-rounds helped propel overall funding, new cash was spread across 614 deals.

Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.

Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You’ll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding.


Blockchain for private-markets investing

Carlos Domingo is cofounder and CEO of Securitize.
Carlos Domingo is cofounder and CEO of Securitize.

Securitize, founded in 2017 by the tech industry veterans Carlos Domingo and Jamie Finn, is bringing blockchain technology to private-markets investing. The company raised $48 million in Series B funding on June 21 from investors including Morgan Stanley and Blockchain Capital.

Securitize helps companies crowdfund capital from individual and institutional investors by issuing their shares in the form of blockchain tokens that allow for more efficient settlement, record keeping, and compliance processes. Morgan Stanley’s Tactical Value fund, which invests in private companies, made its first blockchain-technology investment when it coled the Series B, Securitize CEO Carlos Domingo told Insider.

Here’s the 11-page pitch deck a blockchain startup looking to revolutionize private-markets investing used to nab $48 million from investors like Morgan Stanley


E-commerce focused business banking

Headshot of Novo cofounders Michael Rangel (CEO) and Tyler McIntyre (CTO)
Michael Rangel, cofounder and CEO, and Tyler McIntyre, cofounder and CTO of Novo.

Business banking is a hot market in fintech. And it seems investors can’t get enough.

Novo, the digital banking fintech aimed at small e-commerce businesses, raised a $40.7 million Series A led by Valar Ventures in June. Since its launch in 2018, Novo has signed up 100,000 small businesses. Beyond bank accounts, it offers expense management, a corporate card, and integrates with e-commerce infrastructure players like Shopify, Stripe, and Wise.

Founded in 2018, Novo was based in New York City, but has since moved its headquarters to Miami.

Here’s the 12-page pitch deck e-commerce banking startup Novo used to raise its $40 million Series A


Blockchain-based credit score tech

John Sun, Anna Fridman, and Adam Jiwan are the cofounders of fintech startup Spring Labs.
John Sun, Anna Fridman, and Adam Jiwan are the cofounders of fintech startup Spring Labs.

A blockchain-based fintech startup that is aiming to disrupt the traditional model of evaluating peoples’ creditworthiness recently raised $30 million in a Series B funding led by credit reporting giant TransUnion.

Four-year-old Spring Labs aims to create a private, secure data-sharing model to help credit agencies better predict the creditworthiness of people who are not in the traditional credit bureau system. The founding team of three fintech veterans met as early employees of lending startup Avant.

Existing investors GreatPoint Ventures and August Capital also joined in on the most recent round. So far Spring Labs has raised $53 million from institutional rounds.

TransUnion, a publicly-traded company with a $20 billion-plus market cap, is one of the three largest consumer credit agencies in the US. After 18 months of dialogue and six months of due diligence, TransAmerica and Spring Labs inked a deal, Spring Labs CEO and cofounder Adam Jiwan told Insider.

Here’s the 10-page pitch deck blockchain-based fintech Spring Labs used to snag $30 million from investors including credit reporting giant TransUnion


Digital banking for freelancers

freelance freelancer remote working remotely typing

Lance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an “active” approach to business banking.

“We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it,” Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider.

Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that’s connected to automated tax withholdings.

In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.

Here’s the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including Barclays


Digital tools for independent financial advisors

Jason Wenk, Altruist
Jason Wenk, founder and CEO of Altruist

Jason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he’s running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals.

The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup’s total funding to just under $67 million.

Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an “all-in-one” platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.

Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry.

Here’s the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and Insight


Payments and operations support

HoneyBook Oz Naama Dror co founders
HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.

While countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.

Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.

Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup’s startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company’s fundraising total to $227 million to date.

Here’s the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger Global


Fraud prevention for lenders and insurers

woman shopping online using laptop

Onboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.

But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that’s where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls “digital body language,” or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It’s built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players.

“The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there’s a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy,” Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.

Founded in 2014, the startup’s pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless.

In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.

Here’s the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers’ digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series A


AI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews

Fakespot CEO
Saoud Khalifah, founder and CEO of Fakespot.

Marketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.

That’s where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart.

“There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms,” Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. “Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy.”

Fakespot’s AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.

Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series A


New twists on digital banking

Zach Bruhnke, HMBradley
Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley

Consumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from.

The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model.

“Our thesis going in was that we don’t swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don’t think the customer base that we’re focusing on does either,” Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. “A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis.”

Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.

Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount.

“We’ll pay you more when you save more of what comes in,” Bruhnke said. “We didn’t want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us.”

Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series A

Read the original article on Business Insider

The job market is on fire right now. Here are the best tips for finding a career that you love.

working on beach computer vacation
It’s shaping up to be a hot summer for job searching.

  • This summer is the best time to be looking for a new job.
  • Employers are looking to woo workers with signing bonuses and other perks.
  • Insider’s compiled a helpful guide for anyone searching for a new role this summer.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The job market is on fire right now.

After a steep decline at the beginning of the pandemic, employers are finally beginning to hire again. And they’re hiring a lot. On July 16, job postings on Indeed were up 36.4% above where they were on February 1, 2021, the pre-pandemic baseline. There were 9.2 million open jobs in the US at the end of May, the most recently available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated.

Moving jobs is also a great way to make more money. A 2017 Nomura analysis found that people who had changed jobs earned roughly 1% more year over year than people who stayed with the same employer.

It’s a job seekers’ market, and some employers are working to woo workers with incentives such as bonuses and new employee benefits.

There’s never been a better time to look for a job, and Insider has compiled a helpful guide for anyone looking for a new opportunity.

Table of Contents: Static

Quitting shouldn’t be your first move if you’re unhappy

woman burn out work from home
If you’re feeling burned out, look for small ways to improve your satisfaction at work.

Maybe you don’t want to leave your job, but you’re not exactly thrilled with how things are going. Don’t fret, experts said there are simple tweaks you can make to your workday that may help you feel more fulfilled.

It’s a common problem. Gallup found that 51% of workers in its global analysis of about 112,000 business units were not engaged at work. No wonder 3.6 million US employees left their jobs in May.

But, career experts told Insider, playing to your strengths can help you feel more satisfied at work.

And remember: Don’t be afraid to share feedback with your boss. Chances are that if you’re unhappy, other people are, too.

Read more:

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

Don’t quit your job. Do these 2 steps to get more money or a new boss instead.

A C-suite executive shared his performance review to all 1,400 people in the company to promote a culture of feedback. Read the email he sent.

WFH employees are more emotionally exhausted than those who work in person. Is going back to the office the solution?

When it’s time for a change

Starbucks Now Hiring sign
There were 9.2 million open roles at the end of May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Maybe you’ve tried to make things better at your current role, but they aren’t improving. Or maybe you’ve outgrown your role and want to move on.

Regardless, it’s time to launch your job search.

A good first step is to send some networking messages. Blair Heitmann, a LinkedIn career expert, previously told Insider that your network “is your No. 1 asset as a professional over the course of your career.”

You can also make key tweaks to your job-application materials that may draw the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.

And when you’re ready to give your notice, make sure you don’t burn any bridges with your employer. You never know if you may want to return someday.

Read more:

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

Your best shot at making $100,000 is to work remotely. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Finding the best opportunities

Job fair Florida
A man handing his résumé to an employer at the 25th annual Central Florida Employment Council Job Fair at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.

Jobs in human resources and diversity and inclusion are skyrocketing right now.

HR professionals, for example, are being recruited relentlessly for high-paying roles, experts previously told Insider. Jobs in diversity and inclusion grew 123% between May and September of last year, Indeed data showed.

But these aren’t the only industries worth checking out. It’s important to explore all of your options to find a role that is the best fit for you.

Read more:

The 2021 job market is going to be unlike anything we’ve seen before. Here’s how recruiters and job seekers should handle it.

Diversity and inclusion professionals are being recruited relentlessly. Top execs in the field share their advice for making a name in the industry.

Jobs in diversity are hotter than ever. DEI execs from companies like Wayfair and LinkedIn share strategies for getting into the field.

If you want a career in sports, media, or video games, join the $44B esports industry. A veteran host explains where to start.

HR professionals are being recruited relentlessly and have their pick of top jobs

Asking (and answering) the right questions

A woman gives two thumbs up while videoconferencing in her home for a remote job interview
Know the right questions to ask during your interview.

You’ve done the work and sent out tons of applications. Now hiring managers are scheduling interviews with you.

The most common interview question is “Tell me about yourself.” Jacques Buffett, a career expert at the online résumé service Zety, said interviewees should use this question to briefly mention their career history and tell stories of past achievements.

But it’s also important to know the right questions to ask hiring managers. This could help you get a clearer sense of the company culture.

Read more:

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

PwC is hiring for 100,000 jobs over the next 5 years. Here’s how to prove you have the top trait they’re looking for: agility.

Remote, in person, or somewhere in between

hybrid work
Hybrid work gives you the option to work partially from the office and partially remote.

Once you’ve accepted a job, you have an opportunity to craft your ideal work life.

Maybe you want to be completely remote or solely in the office. Or maybe you want something in between.

Many employers are still sorting out their plans for returning to the office, but regardless, you’re in a good position to negotiate as much flexibility as you want.

Some companies, such as marketing startup Scroll and Kickstarter, are testing out four-day workweeks.

Read more:

How to craft your ideal work life and get your boss on board

Take this personality quiz to find out if you work best from home, in an office, or something in between

Marketing startup Scroll trialed a 4-day workweek for a month and is already seeing huge gains in revenue and employee mental health

Kickstarter CEO: Why we’re doing a 4-day workweek

If you want to ask your boss to let you work from home forever, use this script

Read the original article on Business Insider

We talked to 22 insiders with front row seats to Trump’s hostile takeover of the GOP

Donald Trump against a red background with 16 Republican candidates for the 2016 United States presidential election.
Insider published the definitive oral history of Donald Trump’s rise to political power.

  • Insider interviewed 22 people with front-row seats to the 2016 GOP presidential primaries.
  • We collected colorful anecdotes and never-before-reported details about the historic campaign.
  • Combined, they tell the story of how Trump became the king of the GOP – a crown he still wears to this day.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Five years after the 2016 Republican presidential primary and national convention, the candidates and staffers are still coming to terms with how much has changed – and how much hasn’t – about Trump’s GOP.

That’s why Insider embarked over the past several months on an oral history project to document a truly bizarre time in American history, when the seam between politics and entertainment faded.

To jog our memories, we talked to 22 key insiders who were central to the 2016 presidential race about the unprecedented Trump primary campaign and how he was able to mount a successful hostile takeover over the GOP that still endures today.

Read more: The definitive oral history of how Trump took over the GOP, as told to us by Cruz, Rubio, and 20 more insiders

Our oral history traces Trump’s victory over 16 other brand-name Republicans from 2015 to 2016, including Jeb Bush and his monster $100 million war chest, rising-star senators like Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, and the pugnacious New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

Some of the highlights you’ll remember, like Trump’s infamous escalator ride. Others you might not have never known: he almost took the elevator!- and after the Iowa Caucuses, aides had a come-to-Jesus meeting with him to convince him the election results should be accepted.

Ultimately, we discovered just how many times it seemed like the Trump campaign was on the verge of a catastrophic implosion – and how social media shaped our memories of the raucous primary process in ways that, looking back, didn’t always measure up to reality.

We also laid bare the snake-tangle of staff tensions and disagreements that came to be emblematic of the Apprentice-style governance Trump brought to his White House. Former campaign officials have very different memories of how the 13-month journey to the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland unfolded.

Check out the full Trump takeover oral history and our additional stories here:

  • A top former Trump aide acknowledged the 2016 campaign did pay actors to appear at his big 2015 presidential campaign announcement after denying it to Insider five years ago.
  • Trump team’s pre-debate prep included a ‘party’ with Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry. His band still slapped Trump with a threat to sue later, though.
  • Melania Trump agreed with her husband that then-Sen. John McCain wasn’t a “war hero.”
  • A Bill Clinton staffer had to tell the ex-president about the infamous Trump-Rubio 2016 debate fight over penis size.
  • Trump aides told him over a McDonalds’ meal to stop bitching about losing the Iowa Caucus in 2016.
  • Key moments where Ted Cruz tried to steal the 2016 nomination away from Trump.
  • Trump’s future DOJ spokeswoman said the Republicans who lost to Trump in 2016 reminded her of the people who lost to Hitler.

To read the full Trump oral history story, click here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How does work… well, work? Here are the 5 things every employee making a career change in 2021 should know

7 people sit around a table with their laptops and notebooks working
Employees and job seekers will have to look at the workforce from a new perspective to navigate recent changes.

  • Growing rates of burnout have transformed company culture and resulted in a “Great Resignation.”
  • Preferences between in-person and remote work continue to dictate employment decisions.
  • This page will help you decide if it’s time to get a new job and how to apply.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Work from home was supposed to be temporary.

But in the past 15 months, we’ve lived through a pandemic and a global recession, which led to mass burnout and a spike in voluntary resignations. This new normal means hybrid offices and awkward first encounters with coworkers.

One of the many changes 2021 has brought to the US job market – 9.2 million job openings. Job seekers have the advantage while on the hunt, but they need to know how to use it.

Navigating all the changes in our “work life” over the last year would make anyone’s head spin.

Here are five things any worker who feels they are struggling with should know when trying to excel in their career.

Remote work eliminated work-life balance, but some companies are looking to compensate

Mental Health
The pandemic did not just eliminate in-person socialization but also divisions between the home and office.

The pandemic transformed our living rooms into our office spaces – not the healthiest change for those who already struggled with taking their work home with them.

Burnout has left 61% of Americans feeling at least somewhat burnout and more than 80% have reported that COVID-19 has been a source of change in their lives. With the pandemic causing undue stress on everyone, an unhealthy office culture only adds to the pressure.

Employers need to lead the way in implementing wellness techniques that teach their employees how to care for themselves, take their PTO, and take advantage of flexible work environments.

Read more:

Americans don’t take nearly enough vacation days – and experts say it’s because companies think about PTO all wrong

A day off work and ‘Zoom-free Fridays’ aren’t going to cut it. Here’s how to really tackle burnout.

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

Burnout rates are rising. Zoom-free Fridays and $250,000 bonuses are the tip of the iceberg. Cisco is solving the problem by going deeper into its culture.

LinkedIn’s new VP of flex work shares 3 steps any company can use to create a hybrid work plan for all employees

If the last year has taught you anything, it’s that you have the freedom to leave

A orange sign with pink balloons reads "now hiring."
Workers are leaving their jobs in search of better pay and benefits.

For workers whose companies have failed to help prevent employee burnout, the pandemic has helped them realize one thing – it’s time to quit.

As millions willingly choose to walk away from their jobs, in what economists have coined the “Great Resignation,” some industries have been hit harder than others. In May, 5.3 million people voluntarily left their jobs.

Low pay and unreasonable working conditions across the retail, hospitality, and fast food businesses have created a crisis of, “rage quitting.” While it may feel good to walk out without notice, sometimes it is better to salvage professional connections.

Telling an employer you’re leaving is never easy, but it’s important to be candid.

Read More:

Americans say the pandemic is changing their personalities – and managers need to take notice or risk losing people

Employees are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Here’s how to tell if you’re losing people for the right reasons.

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Expert advice to guide you in the job hunt

Whether it be because of recession or resignation, a lot of candidates are on the job hunt.

Searching for a new role can be intimidating, but job seekers should always start by identifying which industries are hiring and what connections they have within them. After finding the job posting of your dreams it’s all about perfecting your résumé, cover letter, and interview techniques.

Never underestimate the need to customize your application for every job posting – learn from the experts about how to stand out as the pool of job seekers grows.

Read More:

Use this email template from a LinkedIn career expert to network and find a new job

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

Headed to a job interview? These are the red flags to look for that indicate a company’s culture won’t be right for you

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Tips and tricks to help you land a coveted remote job

Work from home
“Work from home” has become “work from anywhere” and many employees want the change to stick.

As lockdown dragged on, people were eager to return to in-person socialization, but the same can’t be said for in-person work.

Freelancers and remote workers were quick to open their inboxes to provide their years of expertise to “conventional workers” who had to quickly set up home offices and adjust to Zoom meetings. And some vacation hotspots welcomed remote workers to bring their laptops and soak up the sun and WiFi.

For those who have been sold on remote work, staying at a company that is committed to providing flexibility is a priority. While many companies – such as Apple, Indeed, and Airbnb – have extended their work from home policies through much of 2021, finding a company that is committed to the practice permanently can be difficult. And the demand is high.

To set yourself up for success, learn what companies are hiring remote workers, how to talk to your boss about working from home, and what can make you stand out when applying for a remote job.

Read More:

This chart shows the type of jobs that are still working from home

The city with the most high-paying jobs isn’t a city – it’s remote work. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

For those who plan to return to the office, new challenges are arising

A male-presenting and female-presenting coworkers bump elbows while walking past each other in an office.
As offices reopen across the country, in-person office culture slowly returns.

Some employees are eager and nervous to see their coworkers face to face.

But spending over a year using your bed as a midday nap spot makes the transition to a populated office space even more difficult – especially if you’ve never even met your team.

While the change to working in an office again can be intimidating, for some workers it may be exactly what they need to get a break from hectic households and reconnect with their passions.

Read More:

Should you work from home or the office? An HR chief outlines her 3-step framework

7 couples confess how WFH changed their romantic relationships, how they handled unexpected tensions, and what happens now

Feeling burned out? It might be time to return to the office.

Meeting your colleagues IRL for the first time? Here are 6 ways to squash the anxiety and make a good impression.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump’s future DOJ spokeswoman said the Republicans he trounced in 2016 reminded her of the people who lost to Hitler

Standing from left to right on a CNBC debate stage, several of them clapping their hands, are 2016 GOP presidential candidates Donald Trump, Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina, Ted Cruz, Chris Christie, and Rand Paul.
GOP 2016 candidates (l-r) Donald Trump, Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina, Ted Cruz, Chris Christie and Rand Paul during CNBC’s debate at the University of Colorado Boulder on October 28, 2015.

  • Sarah Isgur told Insider GOP candidates beaten out by Trump were akin to those who lost to Hitler.
  • The Carly Fiorina campaign vet took a Trump administration job in February 2017.
  • She attempted to defend her “shallow state” stint in a 2020 op-ed.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A campaign aide for former presidential candidate Carly Fiorina said she took the systematic evisceration of the GOP field by Donald Trump pretty hard – attempting, at one point, to escape the psychic trauma by “listening to the Hamilton soundtrack just over and over.”

“I remember wondering who had run against Hitler in Germany and thinking those people deserve more credit in history. Because you can know what the threat is, and you can give everything you’ve got and still lose,” then-Fiorina deputy campaign manager Sarah Isgur said during the reporting for Insider’s definitive oral history of Trump’s takeover of the Republican Party.

The musical therapy must have worked, given that nine months later Isgur wound up interviewing with the dream-crusher she’d dubbed “smart, but a bad person morally.”

Read more: The definitive oral history of how Trump took over the GOP, as told to us by Cruz, Rubio, and 20 more insiders

“What are you to make of the Trump skeptics who joined the administration thinking they could temper his worst instincts?” she wrote in a December 2020 op-ed designed to justify her participation in the politically compromised “shallow state.”

“I knew I was working for a president who wasn’t well versed in our Constitution or the work of the Justice Department,” she rationalized after signing on as a DOJ spokeswoman in February 2017. “But I told myself it was my duty to serve.”

To read the full story click here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Who to know when you’re launching a family office

Todd Angkatavanich, Natasha Pearl, Bill Bjiesse, and Lisa Featherngill on a pink background.
Todd Angkatavanich, Natasha Pearl, Bill Bjiesse, and Lisa Featherngill.

  • As global wealth surges, more people want to start family offices to take control of their finances.
  • Insider spoke to more than a dozen industry insiders to compile a list of 21 must-know experts.

Whether they’re rags-to-riches entrepreneurs or old-money heirs, many of the wealthy have created their own family offices to oversee their assets.

Citi estimates that as many as 15,000 family offices have been created in the past two decades alone.

Insider spoke with more than a dozen family-office professionals to find out who the wealthy go to when deciding to set up their own shops. Whether they’re lawyers or wealth managers, here are 21 must-know family-office experts.

You can read our full story if you’re an Insider subscriber: These are the 21 advisors, accountants, and lawyers to know if you’re thinking about starting your own family office

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Insider spoke with 8 of the most powerful Black women in money management about microaggressions, mentors, and career triumphs

From left: Kim Lew, president and CEO of the Columbia Investment Management Company, Dekia Scott, CIO of Southern Company, Tina Byles Williams, CEO CIO and Founder of Xponance, and Michaela Edwards, partner and portfolio manager at Capricorn Investment Group with magenta circles and a faded white grid behind them on a purple background
From left: Kim Lew, president and CEO of the Columbia Investment Management Company; Dekia Scott, CIO of Southern Company; Tina Byles Williams, CEO CIO and founder of Xponance; and Michaela Edwards, partner and portfolio manager at Capricorn Investment Group.

Institutional investors control a combined $70 trillion in assets – and the majority of people managing that massive money pile are white, male, or both.

Insider spoke with eight Black women in high-powered asset-management roles who collectively control billions of dollars in assets. They shed light on whether the industry’s diversity problems are fully understood. They also discussed victories and pivotal moments in their careers:

  • “I’m fully aware that when you ask the random person, ‘What comes to mind when you think of an investment manager?’ I’m pretty sure that the image that comes to mind doesn’t look like me,” said Tina Byles Williams, the founder, CEO and CIO of Philadelphia-based asset manager Xponance. “It probably doesn’t look like a woman, and it surely doesn’t look like a Black woman. That is the opportunity and the burden.”
  • “I unapologetically take up space,” said Dominique Cherry, head of capital markets at the Philadelphia Board of Pensions and Retirement. “You just make a decision that you’re going to take up as much space as needed until that point that your presence is recognized, your voice is heard, and hopefully you can bring a couple of young people along the way with you.”

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5 pitch decks that legal-tech startups used to raise millions

legal tech lady justice code 4x3
The legal-tech space has raised nearly $1 billion in funding so far this year.

  • Funding for legal-tech is nearing $1 billion for 2021 so far.
  • VC firms, private equity, and even traditional law players are pouring money in.
  • Check out these 5 pitch decks for examples of how legal-tech startup founders sold their vision.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

As law firms and their clients seek to digitize and streamline work, VCs have been opening their wallets to the growing legal-tech space. The total value of deals in the global market to date this year clocks in at at least $974 million – already surpassing the $603 million figure from 2020, according to data from PitchBook.

Private equity firms are also increasingly eyeing legal tech, investing more than $3.6 billion in Q1 of 2021 alone, according to market intelligence platform Bodhala.

Here’s a look at our legal-tech pitch deck collection.


Adrian Camara
Athennian’s CEO and founder, Adrian Camara.

Athennian, which helps law firms and legal departments manage data and workflow around legal entities, raised a $7 million CAD (more than $5.5 million USD) Series A extension in the beginning of March, nearly doubling its initial $8 million Series A round last year.

Athennian’s revenue and headcount more than doubled since the original Series A, according to founder and CEO Adrian Camara. He declined to disclose revenue numbers, but said that the sales and marketing team grew from 35 people in September to around 70 in March.

Launched in 2017, Athennian is used by nearly 200 legal departments and law firms, including Dentons, Fastkind, and Paul Hastings, to automate documents like board minutes, stock certificates, and shareholder consents.

The Series A extension was led by Arthur Ventures. New investors Touchdown Ventures and Clio’s CEO, Jack Newton, also participated in the round, alongside Round13 Capital and other existing investors. To date, Athennian has raised $17 million CAD, or around $14 million USD, in venture capital funding, per Pitchbook.

Here’s the small but mighty pitch deck that nearly doubled legal tech Athennian’s Series A to $12 million.


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Evisort’s CEO and co-founder Jerry Ting.

Contract tech is the frontrunner in the legal tech space, as companies across industries seek to streamline their contract creation, negotiation, and management processes.

Evisort, a contract lifecycle management (CLM) platform, raised $35 million in its Series B announced late February, bringing total funding to $55.5 million. The private equity firm General Atlantic led its latest funding round, with participation from existing investors Amity Ventures, Microsoft’s venture firm M12, and Vertex Ventures.

Founded in 2016, Evisort uses artificial intelligence to help businesses categorize, search, and act on documents.

Its CEO Jerry Ting founded Evisort while he was still attending Harvard Law School. He spent one summer working at Fried Frank, but soon realized that he didn’t want to be a lawyer because he didn’t want to spend excruciating hours manually reading fifty-page contracts. He did, however, recognize how important they are to corporations, and co-founded Evisort as a tool to locate and track valuable information like a contract’s expiration date and obligations like payment dates.

Evisort’s CEO walks through the 11-page pitch deck that the contract software startup used to nab $35 million from investors like General Atlantic – and lays out its path to an IPO


Contractbook_founders_2 min
Niels Brøchner, Jarek Owczarek, and Viktor Heide founded Contractbook to offer a client-centric tool to manage contracts,

Try to imagine the contracts negotiation process, and one might conjure up a scene where a sheaf of papers, tucked discreetly into a manila folder, is shuttled from one law office to the mahogany table of another. With a stroke of a fountain pen, the deal is sealed.

Those old-school methods have long been replaced with the adoption of PDFs, redlined versions of which zip from email inbox to inbox. Now, contracting is undergoing another digital shift that will streamline the process as companies are becoming more comfortable with tech and are seeking greater efficiencies – and investors are taking note.

Contractbook, a Denmark-based contract lifecycle management platform, late last year raised $9.4 million in its Series A investment round, led by venture capital titan Bessemer Venture Partners. In November 2019, Gradient Ventures, Google’s AI-focused venture fund, led Contractbook’s $3.9 million seed round.

Founded in Copenhagen in 2017, Contractbook uses data to automate documents, offering an end-to-end contracts platform for small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Niels Brøchner, the company’s CEO and cofounder, said that Contractbook was born out of the notion that existing contract solutions failed to use a document’s data – from names of parties to the folder the document is stored in – to automate the process and drive workflow.

Here’s the 13-page pitch deck that Contractbook, which wants to take on legal tech giants like DocuSign, used to raise $9.4 million from investors like Bessemer Ventures


Kiwi Camara DISCO headshot
Kiwi Camara, CEO and cofounder of Disco.

Cloud-based technology is having its moment, especially in the legal industry.

As attorneys have been propelled to work remotely amid the pandemic, data security and streamlined work processes are top-of-mind for law firms, leading them to adopt cloud technology.

Investors are taking note. Disco, a cloud-based ediscovery platform that uses artificial intelligence to streamline the litigation process, snapped up $60 million in equity financing in October.

Its Series F, led by Georgian Partners and also backed by VC titans like Bessemer Venture Partners and LiveOak Venture Partners, brings total investment to $195 million, valuing the company at $785 million.

Launched in Houston in 2012, Disco offers AI-fueled products geared towards helping lawyers review and analyze vast quantities of documents, allowing them to more efficiently determine which ones are relevant to a case.

The CEO of Disco, a legal tech that sells cloud-based discovery software, walked us through a 20-page pitch deck the startup used to nab $60 million


Dan Broderick BlackBoiler
Dan Broderick, cofounder and CEO of BlackBoiler.

BlackBoiler is an automated contract markup software that’s used by Am Law 25 firms and several Fortune 1000 companies.

The software uses machine learning to automate the process of reviewing and revising documents in “track changes.” This saves attorneys the time they would typically spend marking up contracts that often use standard boilerplate language.

As a pre-execution software used in the negotiation and markup stage of the contracts process, BlackBoiler has carved out a unique space in the $35 billion contracts industry, said Dan Broderick, a lawyer who cofounded the company in 2015 and is now its CEO.

Broderick walked Insider through the pitch deck the company used to attract funding from investors, including DocuSign as well as 10 attorneys that run the gamut from Am Law 50 partners to general counsel at large corporations.

Check out the 14-page pitch deck that contract-editing startup BlackBoiler used to nab $3.2 million from investors including DocuSign

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7 pitch decks that fintechs looking to disrupt wealth, banking, and credit scores used to raise millions

dollar bills money
Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.

Fintech VC funding hit a fresh quarterly record of $22.8 billion in the first three months of 2021, according to CB Insights data. While mega-rounds helped propel overall funding, new cash was spread across 614 deals.

Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.

Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You’ll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding.


Blockchain-based credit score tech

John Sun, Anna Fridman, and Adam Jiwan are the cofounders of fintech startup Spring Labs.
John Sun, Anna Fridman, and Adam Jiwan are the cofounders of fintech startup Spring Labs.

A blockchain-based fintech startup that is aiming to disrupt the traditional model of evaluating peoples’ creditworthiness recently raised $30 million in a Series B funding led by credit reporting giant TransUnion.

Four-year-old Spring Labs aims to create a private, secure data-sharing model to help credit agencies better predict the creditworthiness of people who are not in the traditional credit bureau system. The founding team of three fintech veterans met as early employees of lending startup Avant.

Existing investors GreatPoint Ventures and August Capital also joined in on the most recent round. So far Spring Labs has raised $53 million from institutional rounds.

TransUnion, a publicly-traded company with a $20 billion-plus market cap, is one of the three largest consumer credit agencies in the US. After 18 months of dialogue and six months of due diligence, TransAmerica and Spring Labs inked a deal, Spring Labs CEO and cofounder Adam Jiwan told Insider.

Here’s the 10-page pitch deck blockchain-based fintech Spring Labs used to snag $30 million from investors including credit reporting giant TransUnion


Digital banking for freelancers

freelance freelancer remote working remotely typing

Lance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an “active” approach to business banking.

“We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it,” Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider.

Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that’s connected to automated tax withholdings.

In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.

Here’s the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including Barclays


Digital tools for independent financial advisors

Jason Wenk, Altruist
Jason Wenk, founder and CEO of Altruist

Jason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he’s running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals.

The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup’s total funding to just under $67 million.

Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an “all-in-one” platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.

Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry.

Here’s the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and Insight


Payments and operations support

HoneyBook Oz Naama Dror co founders
HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.

While countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.

Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.

Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup’s startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company’s fundraising total to $227 million to date.

Here’s the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger Global


Fraud prevention for lenders and insurers

woman shopping online using laptop

Onboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.

But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that’s where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls “digital body language,” or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It’s built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players.

“The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there’s a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy,” Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.

Founded in 2014, the startup’s pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless.

In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.

Here’s the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers’ digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series A


AI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews

Fakespot CEO
Saoud Khalifah, founder and CEO of Fakespot.

Marketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.

That’s where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart.

“There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms,” Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. “Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy.”

Fakespot’s AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.

Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series A


New twists on digital banking

Zach Bruhnke, HMBradley
Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley

Consumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from.

The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model.

“Our thesis going in was that we don’t swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don’t think the customer base that we’re focusing on does either,” Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. “A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis.”

Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.

Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount.

“We’ll pay you more when you save more of what comes in,” Bruhnke said. “We didn’t want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us.”

Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series A

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