New York could have kept a House seat if just 89 more people had been counted in the 2020 census

US Census briefing
The US Census Bureau unveiled which states will gain and lose House seats after the 2020 census

  • New York lost a US House seat by just 89 people, Census Bureau officials revealed Monday.
  • Had 89 more people filled out the Census, the state would have been spared from losing the seat.
  • Minnesota was able to get the 435th House seat and keep all 8 of its districts because of New York.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York could’ve retained one House seat if just 89 more people in the state had filled out the 2020 census, officials revealed Monday.

On Monday, the US Census Bureau unveiled its long-awaited population counts and apportionment figures from the census that determine how many House seats states gained and lost.

Federal law requires the House to have 435 seats that each represent the exact same number of people – just over 760,000 – to satisfy the principle of one person, one vote. This means that states are subject to lose or gain House seats based on changes to their population – and as New York’s experience shows, every completed census form makes a difference.

“What we have is that if New York had had 89 more people, they would have received one more seat instead of the last state that received their last seat,” Kristin Koslap, a senior technical expert for the 2020 Census Apportionment Division, said at a Monday news conference.

“There are 435 seats, so the last seat went to Minnesota, and New York was next in line. And if you do the algebra equation that determines how many they would have needed, it’s 89 people. But that’s if you hold the population of all other states, constant,” she added.

Read more: The great migration of 2020: People from New York and California moved in droves this year – here are the states that benefited from the mass exodus, from Idaho to Texas

Texas came out of the 2020 census as the biggest winner in reapportionment, gaining two House seats. Colorado, Florida, North Carolina, Montana, and Oregon will all each gain one seat.

Meanwhile, California, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia all lost one House seat each.

Alabama, Minnesota, and Rhode Island, which were all projected to lose a seat, didn’t lose any – and Minnesota is able to keep its eight House seats thanks to New York falling short.

Koslap explained, however, that because of the system the Census Bureau uses to determine which state gets the 435th seat, it’s not unheard if for just a few hundred or dozen people to make or break a state’s fortunes.

“It’s part of the standard of the method of equal proportions is that it all depends on the overall proportion of all the states within the nation. And so … it’s not unusual for there to be a small margin like that,” she said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

All the differences between COVID-19 vaccines, summarized in a simple table that you can take to your vaccination appointment

woman getting vaccine
A physician injects someone with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

  • COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, and AstraZeneca all have unique features.
  • They vary in effectiveness, side effects, dosage, and ages approved for the shots.
  • Here is a table that compares them all. Scroll down to view it.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Coronavirus vaccines are the world’s escape route out of a pandemic that has shut down schools, grounded flights, and left millions dead.

Vaccines from Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca-Oxford University, and Johnson & Johnson have been approved in the West. In the US, all of them have been authorized except AstraZeneca’s – in the UK, all of them except Johnson & Johnson’s are authorized.

Each is given as a shot in the muscle of the upper arm.

You might not get a choice about which COVID-19 vaccine you get, but all four offer some protection against severe illness, so the advice is to take one if you are offered it. For the two-dose vaccines, you should have two shots of the same one, where possible.

Speak with your doctor if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, have a specific medical condition, or take medicines -especially if they thin your blood or affect your immune system. Experts have said the COVID-19 vaccines won’t make you infertile. Side effects may start within a day or two and should go away within a few days.

A rare adverse-event associated with AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 shot includes unusual blood clots in the brain. You should seek urgent medical attention if you have a persistent or severe headache lasting more than three days. Other symptoms to watch out for include: shortness of breath, chest pain, painful limbs and tummy pain.

In the US, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended on April 13 that the J&J vaccine’s rollout be paused while authorities looked into reports of rare blood clots in the brain in people who received the shot. J&J temporarily stopped its vaccine rollout in the EU too.

We’ve made a table that gives you the key information for each shot, whether you’ve booked an appointment or not. Scroll down to view it.

Read the original article on Business Insider

These 8 charts show the glaring gap between men’s and women’s salaries in the US

town hall on gender and pay equity in Minneapolis
US Rep. Ilhan Omar poses for a photo with fellow panelists at a town hall meeting on gender pay gap and equity on April 24, 2019, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

  • March 24 is Equal Pay Day, which reflects how many extra days women had to work to make as much as men did in 2020.
  • The gender wage gap persists, and women make 82 cents for every dollar a man makes.
  • These charts show the gap in pay varies widely based on location, race, and several other factors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Men have earned more than women since 1979, the first year with available data.

Equal Pay Day reflects how many extra days women have to work to earn what men did in the previous year. This year’s Equal Pay Day falls on March 24. The Census Bureau wrote in a recent post that this is “earlier than it’s ever been since its inception in 1996,” suggesting a modest shrinking of the gender pay gap. 

Over half a century after the US passed the Equal Pay Act, American women still face a substantial gender wage gap across the spectrum. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research estimates that equal pay will not be reached until 2059.

Based on weekly earnings data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the gap has narrowed over time.

In the first quarter of 1979, median weekly earnings for men age 16 and over working full time was $408, compared to $251 for women. That is, women’s weekly earnings were 61.5% of men’s weekly earnings. There has been some progress over the years, and in the third quarter of 2020 women’s weekly earnings were 81.7% of men’s weekly earnings.

Overall, women who were full-time, year-round employees made 82.3 cents for every dollar men made in 2019, based on median earning data from the Census Current Population Survey. That means women are paid 17.7% less than men, earning $10,157 less than men.

The gender wage gap varies widely by state.

According to American Community Survey data from the US Census Bureau, the gender pay gap in the United States in 2019 was around 19%. This means that a woman who is at least 16 years old, working a full-time, year-round job, and who is part of the civilian employed population makes 81% as much as her male counterpart earns.

The pay gap varies, however, by state.

In Wyoming, for instance, the gender pay gap is 36.6%, the biggest wage gap in the nation based on those who are part of the “full-time, year-round civilian employed population 16 years and over with earnings” population. That is, median earnings of women who in this state make 63.4% of what men earn. In 33 states, the gender pay gap is larger than the national average.

Most states have implemented laws against gender discrimination, and the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects women at the federal level, yet disparities persist.

Vermont had the smallest pay gap in 2019 at 9%, with full-time, year-round women who are at least 16 and part of the civilian employed population making a median salary of $46,641, while men made $51,241.

Major cities show an even bigger discrepancy.

Around the US, salaries in large cities show an even greater range of pay discrepancy between men and women.

The American Association of University Women, a nonprofit that advocates for gender equality, examined how much women earn compared to men in 25 major metro areas using 2019 US Census data from the American Community Survey.

Out of the 25 cities, the narrowest gender wage gap overall is in Los Angeles, where women make approximately 90.6% of the median earnings for men, a pay gap of 9.4%. Detroit had the widest wage gap: Women’s median earnings of $44,486 in this city is 73.8% of men’s earnings of $60,278. That translates to a pay gap of 26.2%.

Overall, Black and Hispanic women face the biggest pay gap when comparing earnings to non-Hispanic white men.

Black and Hispanic women are most affected by the wage gap, especially when compared to non-Hispanic white men, who make up the largest demographic segment of the workforce.

We looked at the wage gap for different racial and ethnic groups using median earnings data for full-time, year-round workers from the US Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.

Asian women face the smallest wage gap — they earn 91.4% of what non-Hispanic white men earned, resulting in a pay gap of just 8.5%. Non-Hispanic white women earn 78.1% of what non-Hispanic white men do, while Black women earn 61.1%. Hispanic women earn 53%, or a pay gap of 47%.

When compared to Black men, Black women earn 90.7% of what men earn, and Hispanic women make 80.6% of what Hispanic men do.

The larger disparity between non-Hispanic white men’s and women of color’s earnings could be attributed to the fact that “women of color suffer both because of their gender and their race,” according to an April 2016 report released by the Senate Joint Economic Committee’s Democratic Staff.

Another way of looking at that gap for women of different racial and ethnic groups is to consider when “equal pay day” for each group falls.

Number of days women have to work into the next year to earn as much as white men calendar graphic

Equal Pay Days further vary by race and ethnicity, in line with the pay discrepancies between non-Hispanic white men and women of different races and ethnicities.  

The above calendar graphic shows how many days into the next year a woman has to work in order to earn what a non-Hispanic white man would have earned in the previous year, using estimates from the American Association of University Women.

For example, a typical full-time, year-round employed Black female worker starting on January 1, 2020, would have finally earned on August 3, 2021, what a similarly employed non-Hispanic white male worker would have made over the course of 2020 alone. That means Black women have to work around seven extra months to earn the same as non-Hispanic men earned in a single year in 2020.

It takes full-time, year-round employed Asian American or Pacific Islander (AAPI) women the shortest time to make what non-Hispanic white men would have made the year before. It would take a female Asian American or Pacific Islander worker over two extra months in 2021, or until March 9, to earn what a non-Hispanic white man earned the year before.

However, pay gaps for Asian women vary further. Although AAPI women make 85 cents for every dollar non-Hispanic white men make, an analysis from the Center for American Progress finds Burmese woman makes just 52 cents for every dollar the median non-Hispanic white man makes, for instance.

Read more about equal pay day by race here.

Women with children gain no salary boost, while men with children are rewarded.

In 2015, women with children were earning roughly the same as women without children, $727 and $726 respectively. However, working fathers with children earned about $141 more than a men without children. 

That gap has slowly been closing since then, as 2019 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that women with children now make slightly more than women without kids under 18 at home.

Men with children see an earnings boost, and the difference between their weekly take-home pay was typically $189 higher than their counterparts without kids in 2019.

For working women, the difference in earnings between women with and without children is minimal. Working mothers only made $30 compared to other working women in 2019.

While this disparity can be attributed to differences in careers and work hours between men and women who have children and those who do not, a 2016 report released by the Senate Joint Economic Committee Democratic Staff says that there is also a difference in how working mothers and fathers are perceived by management.

According to the report, some employers may view motherhood as a “signal of lower levels of commitment and professional competence.” Working fathers, on the other hand, may be viewed as having “increased work commitment and stability.”

Women’s earnings are lower than men’s over the course of a lifetime.

The gender pay gap exists for workers across a lifetime.

Using Census data from the Minnesota Population Center’s IPUMS program, we found that the median full-time, year-round male worker earns more than his female counterpart at every year of age.

The gap is narrower for younger workers, with the median 25-year-old woman earning about 91.1% of the median 25-year-old man. Meanwhile, the median 50-year-old woman earns just 76.9% of her 50-year-old male counterpart.

Women over the age of 75 are almost twice as likely to live in poverty, according to the Senate report. Many women that age didn’t work when they were younger, so they have fewer sources of retirement income than men their age.

In 1950, about 34% of American women were in the labor force, compared to about 86% of men, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By 1980, the numbers were 52% and 77% respectively — and the numbers have largely plateaued since then.

Before the pandemic, the labor force participation rate for women was around 58% in February 2020 and around 56% in February 2021. The labor force participation rate for men was about 69% in February 2020 and about 67% in February 2021.

The number of women promoted to the highest levels within companies reveals unconscious biases.

Very few women are CEOs of major corporations, or in the C-level suite of executives running corporate America.

Data from a study put together by McKinsey & Co. and Lean In show how men are promoted up, while women fall by the wayside. Based on the latest report, only one in five C-level executives were women. Women of color are furthermore underrepresented at the executive level, making up less than 1 in 30 in the C-suite.

A recent IBM report also finds little change between leadership representation in 2019 and 2021. Based on the survey covering 10 industries from nine different regions, women made up just 10% of C-suite and 8% of executive board positions in 2019 and 2021.

The latest McKinsey report suggested that more women are working in senior positions, but it is still hard for women to move up from entry-level jobs into higher roles. “For every 100 men promoted to manager, only 85 women were promoted,” the report said, which affects the number of women being promoted to higher positions in the corporate pipeline.

However, women consistently ask for promotions and raises more. One of the reasons for the disparity between women asking for promotions and actually getting them was because when women negotiate, people like them less for it, according to a previous McKinsey study, covered by Insider, found.

Harvard Business Review found in its research that women ask for raises just as much as men, but men are more “successful” with their requests, with a success rate of 15% for women and 20% for men.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Insider Cannabis: Stocks to bet on for New York legalization – Cannabis on Capitol Hill – Dutchie’s $1.7 billion valuation

GettyImages 1178310599
As the legal cannabis market grows in the US, there are many ways for investors to gain exposure to the industry.

Welcome to Insider Cannabis, our weekly newsletter where we’re bringing you an inside look at the deals, trends, and personalities driving the multibillion-dollar global cannabis boom.

Sign up here to get it in your inbox every week.

Happy Friday readers,

The cannabis news machine was cranking on all cylinders this week.

First, the SAFE Banking Act was reintroduced in the House by a bipartisan group of lawmakers. The Senate version will be introduced next week. We read through the bill and pulled out all the most important details.

The SAFE Banking Act, a relatively narrow cannabis reform bill, has a really good chance of becoming law. The same cannot be said for more widespread decriminalization bills, at least in this Congress, as we reported with our colleague Kimberly Leonard in DC.

President Biden, for his part, will not likely be a friend to cannabis reform efforts – recent reporting from The Daily Beast shows that the White House fired staffers who admitted to past cannabis use. Bob Dylan may have said it best: The times are a-changing, but not quite as quickly as some may have hoped.

It’s important to keep in mind the more pernicious impact of punitive cannabis policies, though: It’s on people of color. Ninety-four percent of marijuana-related arrests by the NYPD last year were people of color.

In other news, check out my panel on cannabis reporting for SXSW online with some of the other folks on the beat. You can watch it anytime before Saturday.

-Jeremy (@jfberke) and Yeji (@jesse_yeji)

Here’s what we wrote about this week:

The CEO of a $1.7 billion cannabis-tech startup shares how he convinced Tiger Global and DFJ to bet on the spread of marijuana legalization

Dutchie closed a $200 million Series C funding round led by Tiger Global. The monster round gives Dutchie a valuation of $1.7 billion.

Cannabis tech is one of the few areas that mainstream investors are allowed to bet on – and cannabis is hot.

A top Wall Street analyst lays out 5 cannabis stocks to buy now that could pop if New York races ahead to legalize marijuana

New York Gov. Cuomo said he expects to strike a deal to legalize cannabis ahead of the April 1 budget. Cantor Fitzgerald analyst Pablo Zuanic picked five companies to bet on that are set to benefit.

The bankruptcy risk of every major cannabis company, ranked

Cannabis companies that survived a tumultuous 2019 and 2020 are seeing their fortunes improve. Insider looked through data from CreditRiskMonitor to see the risk of bankruptcy for major cannabis companies.

The good news is that cannabis companies have generally seen their financial situations improve over the past year. The bad news is that many still remain at risk and in the “red flag” zone.

Several Democratic senators say they’re against cannabis legalization, busting claims that the filibuster is the only obstacle in the way of reform

Democratic leaders want to federally legalize weed, an exciting prospect for the industry. But six Democratic senators on Capitol Hill told Insider they had reservations about doing so.

Insider’s interviews with several senators on Capitol Hill show Democrats aren’t united on the issue, and the prospect of decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level this Congress isn’t as high as the industry envisions. Republicans tend to oppose the matter, but some would like legislation to support cannabis shops.

A House bill would help cannabis companies work with big banks and let you use your credit card when shopping for marijuana. Here are 7 things to know about the bipartisan plan.

House lawmakers introduced a modest cannabis reform bill this week that has a good chance of becoming law, because it has bipartisan support. Insider read through the SAFE Banking Act and chose the top takeaways from the legislation.

Executive Moves

Deals, launches, and IPOs

  • California cannabis company MWG Holdings Group announced it closed a $10.8 Million Series B preferred private placement.
  • Psychedelics company Field Trip announced it closed a $78 million bought deal financing.
  • Cannabis real estate firms NewLake Capital Partners and GreenAcreage Real Estate Corp are merging, to create what the companies say would be the largest cannabis real estate firm with a combined portfolio of $325 million across 9 states.
  • Publicly traded cannabis tech company Akerna will acquire Viridian Sciences, a business management platform geared toward dispensaries in an all-stock transaction. The company did not disclose the size of the deal.

Policy moves and politics

  • Dozens of White House staff have been sidelined for their past cannabis use, according to The Daily Beast. Press Secretary Jen Psaki on Friday said that only five people who started working at the White House are no longer employed.
  • Sens. Chuck Schumer, Cory Booker, and Ron Wyden held a discussion on Facebook Live to underscore their support for the SAFE Banking Act and federal marijuana decriminalization.
  • A deal to legalize recreational cannabis in New York is “very close” according to state lawmakers and Gov. Cuomo. Senator Liz Krueger, a co-sponsor of the MRTA, said in a radio interview this week that she is “extremely pleased” with the agreement that Gov. Cuomo and other lawmakers have reached in regards to growing pot at home and social equity funding.
  • The New Mexico Senate Judiciary Committee passed HB12, a bill that would legalize cannabis in the state, on Thursday. The bill could become law as soon as this weekend.
  • A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced the SAFE Banking Act, a bill that would allow cannabis companies to access banking services. Read our story here.
  • Sen. Bob Menendez reintroduced the CLAIM Act, a bill that would allow cannabis companies to access insurance.

Research and data

  • A report from the nonprofit Tax Foundation found that the value of marijuana sales – if projections hold – may be twice that of firearms and ammunition and three times bigger than McDonald’s sales revenue by 2023.
  • Between 2010 and 2019, there were eight times as many marijuana-related arrests of Black and Latinx people as there were of white people in New York City, according to a report from the nonprofit Drug Policy Alliance and the City University of New York’s Public Science Project.
  • People of color made up 94% of arrests by the NYPD last year, according to the department’s data.

Earnings roundup

  • Columbia Care released its Q4 and full-year results, reporting a combined revenue of $76 million and a $73.7 million net loss for the quarter.
  • Green Thumb Industries released its Q4 and full-year results, reporting net revenue of $177.2 million and $22.5 million in net income.
  • Sundial released its Q4 and full-year results, reporting net revenue of C$13.9 million and a net loss of C$64.1 million.
  • Hexo Corp released its Q2 results, reporting net revenue of $32.8 million and a net loss of $20.8 million.

Chart of the week

Cannabis jobs have been growing rapidly across the US in recent years. The industry has averaged 27.5% growth each year, according to Leafly’s 2021 Jobs Report. In 2021, there are now 321,000 legal cannabis jobs in the country:

Total cannabis jobs in the US

What we’re reading

Investors Are Debating Who Should Own the Future of Psychedelics (Vice)

‘Chopped’ Takes on Cannabis and Generation Z in New Editions for Discovery Plus (Variety)

Can Magic Mushrooms Heal Us? (NYT)

Biden White House Sandbags Staffers, Sidelines Dozens for Pot Use (The Daily Beast)

Does smoking marijuana cause cancer? (Discover Magazine)

The data on legalizing weed (NPR)

No One Knows Where President Biden is on Marijuana (The News Station)

Mexico’s move to greenlight marijuana may pressure Biden (Politico)

Read the original article on Business Insider

7 charts that show the glaring gap between men’s and women’s salaries in the US

town hall on gender and pay equity in Minneapolis
US Rep. Ilhan Omar poses for a photo with fellow panelists at a town hall meeting on gender pay gap and equity on April 24, 2019, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

  • Not only is March Women’s History Month, but March 24 is Equal Pay Day for women.
  • Even though a lot of progress has been made, the gender wage gap persists.
  • That gap in pay varies widely based on location, race, and several other factors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

March is not only Women’s History Month, where all the hard work and achievements of women are recognized, but March 24 marks this year’s Women’s Equal Pay Day.

The date refers to how many days into 2021 women had to work to make as much as men did in just 2020. Equal Pay Days further vary by race and ethnicity, in line with the pay discrepancies between non-Hispanic white men and women of different races and ethnicities.

And while women have gained important political power and some gains in the corporate pipeline, there is still work to be done to reach equality, especially when it comes to financial power.

Over half a century after the US passed the Equal Pay Act, American women still face a substantial gender wage gap across the spectrum. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research estimates that equal pay will not be reached until 2059.

Overall, women who were full-time, year-round employees made 82.3 cents for every dollar men made in 2019, based on median earning data from the Census Current Population Survey. That means women are paid 17.7% less than men, earning $10,157 less than men.

The seven charts below illustrate the significant pay discrepancies between men and women based on race, age, geographical location, and more.

The gender wage gap varies widely by state.

According to American Community Survey data from the US Census Bureau, the gender pay gap in the United States in 2019 was around 19%. This means that a woman who is at least 16 years old, working a full-time, year-round job, and who is part of the civilian employed population makes 81% as much as her male counterpart earns.

The pay gap varies, however, by state.

In Wyoming, for instance, the gender pay gap is 36.6%, the biggest wage gap in the nation based on those who are part of the “full-time, year-round civilian employed population 16 years and over with earnings” population. That is, median earnings of women who in this state make 63.4% of what men earn. In 33 states, the gender pay gap is larger than the national average.

Most states have implemented laws against gender discrimination, and the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects women at the federal level, yet disparities persist.

Vermont had the smallest pay gap in 2019 at 9%, with full-time, year-round women who are at least 16 and part of the civilian employed population making a median salary of $46,641, while men made $51,241.

Major cities show an even bigger discrepancy.

Around the US, salaries in large cities show an even greater range of pay discrepancy between men and women.

The American Association of University Women, a nonprofit that advocates for gender equality, examined how much women earn compared to men in 25 major metro areas using 2019 US Census data from the American Community Survey.

Out of the 25 cities, the narrowest gender wage gap overall is in Los Angeles, where women make approximately 90.6% of the median earnings for men, a pay gap of 9.4%. Detroit had the widest wage gap: Women’s median earnings of $44,486 in this city is 73.8% of men’s earnings of $60,278. That translates to a pay gap of 26.2%.

Overall, Black and Hispanic women face the biggest pay gap when comparing earnings to non-Hispanic white men.

Black and Hispanic women are most affected by the wage gap, especially when compared to non-Hispanic white men, who make up the largest demographic segment of the workforce.

We looked at the wage gap for different racial and ethnic groups using median earnings data for full-time, year-round workers from the US Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.

Asian women face the smallest wage gap — they earn 91.4% of what non-Hispanic white men earned, resulting in a pay gap of just 8.5%. Non-Hispanic white women earn 78.1% of what non-Hispanic white men do, while Black women earn 61.1%. Hispanic women earn 53%, or a pay gap of 47%.

When compared to Black men, Black women earn 90.7% of what men earn, and Hispanic women make 80.6% of what Hispanic men do.

The larger disparity between non-Hispanic white men’s and women of color’s earnings could be attributed to the fact that “women of color suffer both because of their gender and their race,” according to an April 2016 report released by the Senate Joint Economic Committee’s Democratic Staff.

Another way of looking at that gap for women of different racial and ethnic groups is to consider when “equal pay day” for each group falls.

Number of days women have to work into the next year to earn as much as white men calendar graphic

The above calendar graphic shows how many days into the next year a woman has to work in order to earn what a non-Hispanic white man would have earned in the previous year, using estimates from the American Association of University Women.

Equal Pay Day for all women falls this year on March 24. This day falls much later in the year for some racial and ethnic groups.

For example, a typical full-time, year-round employed Black female worker starting on January 1, 2020, would have finally earned on August 3, 2021, what a similarly employed non-Hispanic white male worker would have made over the course of 2020 alone. That means Black women have to work around seven extra months to earn the same as non-Hispanic men earned in a single year in 2020.

It takes full-time, year-round employed Asian American or Pacific Islander (AAPI) women the shortest time to make what non-Hispanic white men would have made the year before. It would take a female Asian American or Pacific Islander worker over two extra months in 2021, or until March 9, to earn what a non-Hispanic white man earned the year before.

However, pay gaps for Asian women vary further. Although AAPI women make 85 cents for every dollar non-Hispanic white men make, an analysis from the Center for American Progress finds Burmese woman makes just 52 cents for every dollar the median non-Hispanic white man makes, for instance.

Read more about equal pay day by race here.

Women with children gain no salary boost, while men with children are rewarded.

In 2015, women with children were earning roughly the same as women without children, $727 and $726 respectively. However, working fathers with children earned about $141 more than a men without children. 

That gap has slowly been closing since then, as 2019 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that women with children now make slightly more than women without kids under 18 at home.

Men with children see an earnings boost, and the difference between their weekly take-home pay was typically $189 higher than their counterparts without kids in 2019.

For working women, the difference in earnings between women with and without children is minimal. Working mothers only made $30 compared to other working women in 2019.

While this disparity can be attributed to differences in careers and work hours between men and women who have children and those who do not, a 2016 report released by the Senate Joint Economic Committee Democratic Staff says that there is also a difference in how working mothers and fathers are perceived by management.

According to the report, some employers may view motherhood as a “signal of lower levels of commitment and professional competence.” Working fathers, on the other hand, may be viewed as having “increased work commitment and stability.”

Women’s earnings are lower than men’s over the course of a lifetime.

The gender pay gap exists for workers across a lifetime.

Using Census data from the Minnesota Population Center’s IPUMS program, we found that the median full-time, year-round male worker earns more than his female counterpart at every year of age.

The gap is narrower for younger workers, with the median 25-year-old woman earning about 91.1% of the median 25-year-old man. Meanwhile, the median 50-year-old woman earns just 76.9% of her 50-year-old male counterpart.

Women over the age of 75 are almost twice as likely to live in poverty, according to the Senate report. Many women that age didn’t work when they were younger, so they have fewer sources of retirement income than men their age.

In 1950, about 34% of American women were in the labor force, compared to about 86% of men, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By 1980, the numbers were 52% and 77% respectively — and the numbers have largely plateaued since then.

Before the pandemic, the labor force participation rate for women was around 58% in February 2020 and around 56% in February 2021. The labor force participation rate for men was about 69% in February 2020 and about 67% in February 2021.

The number of women promoted to the highest levels within companies reveals unconscious biases.

Very few women are CEOs of major corporations, or in the C-level suite of executives running corporate America.

Data from a study put together by McKinsey & Co. and Lean In show how men are promoted up, while women fall by the wayside. Based on the latest report, only one in five C-level executives were women. Women of color are furthermore underrepresented at the executive level, making up less than 1 in 30 in the C-suite.

Since 2015, there’s been an increase in the share of women in the C-Suite, while women in lower-level management roles have seen a smaller increase since that year. 

A recent IBM report also finds little change between leadership representation in 2019 and 2021. Based on the survey covering 10 industries from nine different regions, women made up just 10% of C-suite and 8% of executive board positions in 2019 and 2021.

The latest McKinsey report suggested that more women are working in senior positions, but it is still hard for women to move up from entry-level jobs into higher roles. “For every 100 men promoted to manager, only 85 women were promoted,” the report said, which affects the number of women being promoted to higher positions in the corporate pipeline.

However, women consistently ask for promotions and raises more. One of the reasons for the disparity between women asking for promotions and actually getting them was because when women negotiate, people like them less for it, according to a previous McKinsey study, covered by Insider, found.

According to Lean In, women who negotiate are more likely than men who negotiate to receive feedback that they are “intimidating,” “too aggressive,” or “bossy.”

Another poll by American Express and The New York Women’s Foundation found that less than one-third of women were comfortable with calling themselves ambitious. According to psychologists interviewed by Insider, the reasoning behind this is that the word could be seen as aggressive.   

Harvard Business Review found in its research that women ask for raises just as much as men, but men are more “successful” with their requests, with a success rate of 15% for women and 20% for men.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Top cannabis stock picks for 2021

Marijuana Cannabis
Welcome to Insider Cannabis.

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Happy Friday readers,

Never a dull week in the cannabis (and psychedelics industry). The biggest headline news this week is Atai’s monstrous $157 million raise. CEO Florian Brand told Yeji the company is “doubling down” on its strategy – you can read her report here

Beyond that, I asked Jason Wild of JW Asset Management for his top cannabis picks for 2021. In short, he’s bullish on US cannabis

And last, I had the chance to chat with five-time NBA All-Star Chris Webber about his new $100 million cannabis equity fund and his push to make cannabis more inclusive from the start. 

“I don’t know of any other industry where this type of vested interest has been made to make change,” Webber told me. “It hasn’t been in tech – tech is lucrative. It damn sure wasn’t in cotton, it wasn’t in transportation.”

You can read more from him here

-Jeremy (@jfberke) and Yeji (@jesse_yeji)

Here’s what we wrote about this week:

The biggest private psychedelics company in the world just raised a record $157 million, pushing psychedelics further into the mainstream

Just months after breaking the record for the largest funding round in the psychedelics field, Atai Life Sciences has raised another $157 million to continue to develop treatments for mental illnesses like depression, addiction, and anxiety. CEO Florian Brand told Insider the money will be used to “double down” on the company’s strategy.

A hedge-fund manager who returned 146% last year shares the 6 cannabis stocks he’s betting on now and why he’s bullish on the industry

Jason Wild had a pretty good year last year.

His hedge fund, JW Asset Management, returned over 146% in 2020 – buoyed by significant investments in the cannabis industry. In an interview, Wild shared the six cannabis stocks he’s betting on, including Trulieve and TerrAscend, Green Thumb Industries, and more. 

Former NBA All Star Chris Webber is launching a $100 million fund to help minority entrepreneurs get ahead in cannabis. He told why it’s crucial to build an inclusive industry from the start.

Former five-time NBA All-Star Chris Webber has a new mission: Helping minority entrepreneurs access the economic boom created by the wave of cannabis legalization sweeping the US.

Webber is launching a $100 million fund to invest in Black and other minority cannabis entrepreneurs. He told Insider he has a unique opportunity to ensure that the cannabis industry is inclusive from the start.

Executive Moves

  • Private MSO Parallel announced on Monday that Walgreen’s veteran Jeremy Kunicki would be coming aboard as the company’s new CFO.
  • California cannabis distributor HERBL said on Wednesday that it had appointed Chemistry Holdings founder Josh Held as chief strategy officer.
  • Psychedelics company NovaMind has appointed Joseph Braganza as an SVP in charge of the company’s M&A strategy.

Deals, launches, and IPOs

Policy moves

Science and research

Chart of the week

Psychedelics companies saw a rush of private funding in 2020, according to data from CB Insights. In 2020, private psychedelics startups raised $448 million globally, compared to just $95 million in 2019. Insider rounded up the 14 psychedelics startups that raised the most capital in 2020:

Capital flooded into the psychedelics space in 2020

What we’re reading

MedMen co-founders Bierman, Modlin return to cannabis industry with different California company (Marijuana Business Daily)

Pot or Alcohol, Barron’s Has Never Favored Prohibition (Barron’s)

Merrick Garland, cannabis policy, and restorative justice (Brookings)

Aphria-Tilray cannabis merger talks overcame pandemic pause, rival bidder and other hurdles, proxy reveals (Marijuana Business Daily)

Should marijuana legalization limit THC? Probably not, but it’s happening (Forbes)

Read the original article on Business Insider

Bonds can be taxable or tax-free – here’s your guide to the different types and calculating what’s due on them

bonds
Bonds are divided into two classes: taxable and tax-exempt. While their capital gains are always taxable, the interest they earn may not be.

All investments generate income in one way or another – sometimes as you hold them, sometimes only when you sell them for a profit. And that investment income tends to be taxable.

Bonds are no exception. But as an asset class, they’re a particularly diverse group. And so is the way they’re taxed. Some bonds are fully taxable, some partially taxable, and some not at all. 

And because they generate income in a few different ways, their tax rates vary too. 

Let’s examine bonds and taxes in more detail.

How are bonds taxed?

Bonds and bond funds generate two different types of income: interest and capital gains

Interest

Bonds are a type of debt instrument. When you buy a bond, you’re loaning money to the government or company that issued it; in return, that entity pays you interest. Most bonds pay a fixed, predetermined rate of interest over their lifespan. 

That interest income may be taxable or tax-free (more on the types of bonds that generate tax-free income later). For the most part, if the interest is taxable, you pay income taxes on that interest in the year it’s received. 

The rate you’ll pay on bond interest is the same rate you pay on your ordinary income, such as wages or income from self-employment. There are seven tax brackets, ranging from 10% to 37%. So if you’re in the 37% tax bracket, you’ll pay a 37% federal income tax rate on your bond interest.

Capital gains

If you buy a bond when it’s first issued and hold it until maturity – the full length of its lifespan – you generally won’t recognize a capital gain or loss. The money you get back is considered a return of your principal – what you originally invested in it.

However, after they’re issued, bonds often trade on financial exchanges, just like stocks. If you sell them before their maturity date on the secondary market, the bonds can generate capital gains and losses, depending on how its current price compares to your original cost. Bond funds can also generate capital gains and losses as the fund manager buys and sells securities within the fund.

So, the profit you make from selling a bond is considered a capital gain. Capital gains are taxed at different rates depending on whether they’re short-term or long-term.

Short-term capital gains apply if you hold the bond for one year (365 days) or less. Then the gain is taxed at your ordinary income tax rates.

Long-term capital gains apply if you hold the bond for more than one year. Then you can benefit from reduced tax rates, ranging from 0% to 20%, depending on your filing status and total taxable income for the year.

capital gains

Are all bonds taxed?

Bonds are divided into two classes: taxable and tax-exempt. 

A bond’s tax-exempt status applies only to the bond’s interest income. Any capital gains generated from selling a bond or bond fund before its maturity date is taxable, regardless of the type of bond. 

Taxable bonds

The interest income from taxable bonds is subject to federal, state (and local, if applicable) income taxes.

Taxable bonds include:

  • Corporate bonds
  • Mortgage-backed securities
  • Global bond funds
  • Diversified bond funds

Tax-exempt bonds

Municipal bonds, aka munis, are the main type of tax-exempt bonds. 

Munis are issued by states, counties, cities, and other government agencies to fund major capital projects, such as building schools, hospitals, highways, and other public buildings.

Interest income from muni bonds is generally not subject to federal income taxes. It can also be exempt from state or local income taxes if your home state or city issues the bond. Interest income from muni bonds issued by another state or city is taxable on your state or local income tax return. 

Fast fact: Muni bonds exempt from federal, state, and local taxes are known as “triple tax exempt.”

US Treasuries, bonds issued by the US Dept. of the Treasury, and savings bonds are also tax-exempt – to a degree. If you own them, you owe federal income tax on them. However, they are generally free from state and local income taxes. 

How can I avoid paying taxes on bonds?

Here are a few strategies for avoiding – or at least reducing – the taxes you pay on bonds.

  • Hold the bond in a tax-advantaged account. When you invest in bonds within a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k), the returns are tax-free, as long as you follow the withdrawal rules. Bond income and profits from sales earned within a traditional IRA or 401(k) are tax-deferred, meaning you don’t pay taxes until you withdraw the money in retirement.
  • Use savings bonds for educational purposes. Consider using Series EE or Series I savings bonds to save for education. When you redeem the bond, the interest paid is tax-exempt as long as you use the money to pay for qualified higher education expenses and meet other qualifications
  • Hold bonds until maturity. Holding a bond until maturity, instead of selling it early on the secondary market can help you avoid paying taxes on capital gains. However, you still owe tax on any taxable interest generated by the bond while you owned it.

The financial takeaway

Minimizing the tax consequences of bonds comes down to investing in tax-exempt bonds, such as muni bonds and US Treasuries, and using tax-advantaged accounts where your money can grow on a tax-free or tax-deferred basis.

If you invest in bonds outside of tax-advantaged accounts, you’ll receive a Form 1099 from the bank or brokerage holding your investments around January 31 of each year. Hold on to these forms, as you’ll need them to report bond interest and capital gains on your tax return. The IRS also gets a copy of those 1099s.

 If you miss reporting any income, they’ll be sure to let you know.

Related Coverage in Investing:

A corporate bond provides companies with cash and investors with income – here’s how to evaluate the risks and rewards

Fixed-income investing is a strategy that focuses on low-risk investments paying a reliable return

Bonds vs. CDs: The key differences and how to decide which income-producing option is better for you

What are junk bonds? A risky yet high-yield investment that can bring rewards if you’re willing to take the chance

How to buy treasury bonds, one of the safest ways to invest for income

Read the original article on Business Insider

Insider Cannabis: WallStreetBets comes for weed – Cannabis hedge funds post eye-popping returns – What to know about psychedelics

medical marijuana cbd hemp weed smoking joint leafly flowers cannabis cox 96

Welcome to Insider Cannabis, our weekly newsletter where we’re bringing you an inside look at the deals, trends, and personalities driving the multibillion-dollar global cannabis boom.

Sign up here to get it in your inbox every week.

Happy Friday readers,

This week’s volatility was brought to you by the WallStreetBets forum on Reddit. As “meme stocks” like Gamestop and AMC fell back to Earth, the forum’s users turned to a new target: cannabis stocks.

The trading frenzy saw shares of Canadian cannabis companies like Sundial and Tilray surge on Wednesday, and slump on Thursday.

We’ve got you covered on the implications of all this – and where you should be putting your money instead. 

Beyond that, we have a look at how hedge funds with significant investments in cannabis weathered the crash of 2019, and profited in 2020. One fund, JW Asset Management, ended the year up a whopping 146%. You can read that story here.

Yeji took a dive into the emerging psychedelics space, breaking down the top players, their business models, and when to expect their medications to hit the market.

-Jeremy (@jfberke) and Yeji (@jesse_yeji)

Here’s what we wrote about this week:

What to know about the major public psychedelics companies, including a guide to their business models and when they expect to sell medications

A year ago, there were just a handful of publicly traded psychedelics companies.

Today, the landscape looks drastically different as psychedelics companies have made the jump into public markets, seeking more capital to develop drugs for regulatory approval, build out networks of clinics, or cultivate and extract psilocybin from mushrooms.

Insider identified the biggest companies in the industry, most of which have gone public within the past year. Here’s what to know about them, including a guide to their business models and when they expect to sell medications

Reddit traders are piling into cannabis stocks and driving up valuations, but experts say they’re betting on the wrong companies

The traders who hang out on the Reddit forum WallStreetBets have a new target as GameStop shares fall back to Earth: cannabis. 

But investors say those looking to bet on US legalization are looking in the wrong place: They should be investing in US companies directly.

Three hedge funds that focus on cannabis generated eye-popping returns by betting on the US, according to exclusive documents

Three hedge funds that have significant holdings in the cannabis industry, including dedicated cannabis funds, shared returns exclusively with Insider. The documents show that after steep losses in 2019, investors who held on were rewarded as the industry recovered.

JW Asset Management led the pack, gaining a whopping 146% in 2020. 

Here are the cannabis stocks that experts say you should bet on now

The biggest cannabis stocks had a wild week. They got slammed on Thursday, after soaring on Wednesday, in part thanks to retail traders spurred by Reddit forum WallStreetBets.

Insider talked to analysts who said that the stocks that are currently experiencing volatile trading aren’t the right companies to bet on. Instead, they said, look to US MSOs. 

Executive Moves

Deals, launches, and IPOs

Policy moves

  • Former HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius joined the National Cannabis Roundtable as co-chair. Sebelius, also the former Democratic governor of Kansas, will be heading the industry group alongside former Republican House Speaker John Boehner. Read more here from Politico.
  • Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers unveiled a plan this week to legalize marijuana through the state budget, reports Marijuana Moment.
  • Marlboro-maker Altria registered to lobby on cannabis legalization in its home state of Virginia, where lawmakers passed legalization bills last week. Altria has a significant stake in Canadian cannabis company Cronos Group. 

Earnings Roundup

  • Canopy Growth reported Q3 earnings on Tuesday, reporting C$152.5 million revenue and an C$829 million loss. CEO David Klein said on a call with investors that he expects Canopy to enter the US market later this year and said that he predicts the company will turn a profit by 2022. 
  • Aurora Cannabis reported its Q2 earnings on Thursday, reporting C$67.7 million in revenue and an adjusted EBITDA losses of C$16.8 million. 
  • cbdMD reported its Q1 earnings on Tuesday, reporting $12.3 million in net sales and a $9.4 million loss.
  • Canopy Rivers reported its Q3 earnings on Wednesday, reporting net income of C$1.4 million. The company said its revenue increase was driven by its investment in US cannabis company TerrAscend.
  • MedMen and Green Thumb Industries are scheduled to announce earnings next week.

Science and research

Chart of the week

The largest cannabis markets in the US will be California, Illinois, Florida, Michigan, and Colorado, by 2025 according to data from New Frontier Data. The data assumes no additional states pass legalization measures and there are no significant federal policy changes:

Legal cannabis market share estimates in 2025

What we’re reading

How Tobacco Giant Altria Is Becoming A Cannabis Company (Forbes)

The Half-Legal Cannabis Trap (Politico)

Can a Company Patent the Basic Components of Psychedelic Therapy? (VICE)

Many think weed is already legal in N.J. But cops still make arrests as Murphy, lawmakers haggle over bills. (NJ.com)

Read the original article on Business Insider

The NFL quarterbacks who have played in and won the most Super Bowls

tom brady bucs
Tom Brady won his seventh Super Bowl and fifth Super Bowl MVP award on Sunday, but the Buccaneers QB was already the undisputed champion of this list.

  • Only a handful of NFL quarterbacks have started in the Super Bowl multiple times in their careers.
  • Tom Brady leads the pack with 10 Super Bowl appearances and seven victories – the most recent of which came on Sunday.
  • Check out the full list of starting quarterbacks who have played multiple Super Bowls below:
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.
Two Appearances

Craig Morton (0-2)

Craig Morton

Craig Morton led the Dallas Cowboys to Super Bowl V in 1970, but he quickly fell out of favor with the team and lost his starting role to Roger Staubach. He became the first quarterback to start in a Super Bowl for two different teams when he revived his career with the Denver and played in Super Bowl XII for the Broncos eight years later.

Source: Star-Telegram

Russell Wilson (1-1)

russell wilson

After leading the Seattle Seahawks to their first-ever Super Bowl victory in 2013, Russell Wilson led the franchise to a second Super Bowl berth the following season.

Brett Favre (1-1)

Brett Favre

Legendary Packers quarterback and Hall of Famer Brett Favre — who played 16 seasons in Green Bay — led the Packers to back-to-back Super Bowls in 1995 and 1996. He became the first and only player to win three straight NFL Most Valuable Player awards.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Joe Thiesmann (1-1)

Joe Theismann

Joe Theismann led the Washington Redskins to consecutive Super Bowl appearances, but he is arguably most well-known for the gruesome, career-ending leg injury he suffered while being sacked by New York Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor in 1985.

Source: Washington Post

Len Dawson (1-1)

Len Dawson

Hall of Famer Len Dawson led Kansas City to Super Bowl I where the Chiefs fell to the Green Bay Packers 35-10. Three years later, Dawson earned MVP honors for leading Kansas City to a 23-7 Super Bowl victory over the Minnesota Vikings.

Patrick Mahomes (1-0)

Patrick Mahomes

Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs are headed to their second Super Bowl in as many years this weekend. Mahomes won his first battle on football’s greatest stage against the San Francisco 49ers in 2020, but this time, he’ll be up against the winningest quarterback in Super Bowl history.

Eli Manning (2-0)

eli manning

Eli Manning may have fallen out of favor with some New York Giants fans, but he led the franchise to two Super Bowl victories, including an improbable win over Tom Brady and the previously undefeated New England Patriots in 2008.

Jim Plunkett (2-0)

Jim Plunkett

After winning the Heisman Trophy at Stanford, Jim Plunkett quarterbacked the Oakland Raiders to two Super Bowl wins in 1980 and 1983.

Source: Heisman.com

Bart Starr (2-0)

Bart Starr

Bart Starr did it first. Literally. Starr led the Green Bay Packers to victory in Super Bowls I and II and earned his way into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Three Appearances

Fran Tarkenton (0-3)

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton — a prolific offensive weapon known for his ability to scramble — led the Minnesota Vikings to a whopping six division titles and three Super Bowl appearances, but never brought a Lombardi Trophy back to Minneapolis.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Kurt Warner (1-2)

Kurt Warner

Kurt Warner went from going undrafted out of college to leading the Los Angeles Rams and Arizona Cardinals to a combined three Super Bowl appearances between 1999 and 2008. When all was said and done, Warner had earned two NFL MVP awards, and Super Bowl ring, and a bid to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Ben Roethlisberger (2-1)

ben roethlisberger

Ben Roethlisberger became the youngest Super Bowl-winning quarterback in league history when he led the Pittsburgh Steelers to the victory over the Seattle Seahawks at 23 years old. Since then, Big Ben has made two more Super Bowl appearances and brought a second Lombardi trophy back to the Steel City.

Bob Griese (2-1)

Bob Griese

Hall of Famer Bob Griese led the Miami Dolphins to three consecutive AFC championships and back-to-back Super Bowl victories in 1973 and 1974. Most notably, Griese anchored the Dolphins team that posted a perfect 17-0 season in 1972-73 — the only complete undefeated season in NFL history.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Troy Aikman (3-0)

Troy Aikman

After earning All-America honors at UCLA, Troy Aikman made an immediate impact for the Dallas Cowboys as the first overall pick in the 1989 NFL Draft. He led the Cowboys to three Super Bowl victories in four years and cemented his legacy with a spot in the Hall of Fame.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Four Appearances

Jim Kelly (0-4)

Jim Kelly

Hall of Famer Jim Kelly led the Buffalo Bills to four consecutive Super Bowl appearances between the years of 1991 and 1994, but he could not bring Buffalo its first Lombardi Trophy. The Bills still have yet to win a Super Bowl.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Peyton Manning (2-2)

Peyton Manning

Peyton Manning is the only starting quarterback to win Super Bowls with two different teams. He took the Indianapolis Colts to two Super Bowls and won his first in 2007 before taking his talents to Denver. Manning led the Broncos to the Super Bowl in 2014 and rode off into the sunset after winning Super Bowl 50 two years later. He holds many NFL records, including touchdown passes with 539 and MVP awards with five.

Source: SBNation

Roger Staubach (2-2)

Roger Staubach

Roger Staubach took the Dallas Cowboys to four Super Bowls in an eight-year span and brought home two Lombardi trophies in the process. The Hall of Famer retired in 1979 with the best passing rating of any quarterback through that point with an 83.4 mark.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Joe Montana (4-0)

Joe Montana

In his 15 seasons playing for the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs, Joe Montana captivated NFL fans with his uncanny ability to mount comeback victories, a feat so common it became known as “Montana Magic.” He won Super Bowls XVI, XIX, XXIII, and XXIV and earned MVP honors for all but one of those games.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Terry Bradshaw (4-0)

Terry Bradshaw

With a big arm and impressive mind for the game, Terry Bradshaw led the Pittsburgh Steelers to an unprecedented four Super Bowl victories in six years.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

Five Appearances

John Elway (2-3)

John Elway

The ultimate dual-threat quarterback, John Elway spent his entire 16-year career with the Denver Broncos. The Hall of Famer accounted for 82.2% of points scored by the Broncos during his tenure with the franchise and led the team to five Super Bowl appearances, winning back-to-back in Super Bowls XXXII and XXXIII.

Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame

10 Appearances

Tom Brady (7-3)

tom brady bucs yell 1

Arguably the best quarterback of all time, Tom Brady has made an NFL-record 10 Super Bowl appearances and earned five Super Bowl MVP awards — the most ever by a single player. After leading the New England Patriots to victory in Super Bowl LIII in 2019, Brady became the only player in the history of the NFL to win six Super Bowl rings.

But for the first time in his career, Brady spent the 2020-2021 season with a different team. He left New England for the Buccaneers during the 2020 offseason, and he managed to secure a Super Bowl victory with Bruce Arians’ squad in his very first season in Tampa Bay. Now, the 43-year-old has seven Vince Lombardi trophies to his name. And, somehow, he’s still hungry for more.

“We’re coming back,” Brady said upon hoisting the Lombardi trophy. “You already know that.”

Source: SBNation

Now check out what happened to the rest of the players involved in the trade that landed Jared Goff with the Rams.

Jared Goff

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? All of the picks in the massive trade that helped the Rams land Jared Goff

Read the original article on Business Insider