How does work… well, work? Here are the 5 things every employee making a career change in 2021 should know

7 people sit around a table with their laptops and notebooks working
Employees and job seekers will have to look at the workforce from a new perspective to navigate recent changes.

  • Growing rates of burnout have transformed company culture and resulted in a “Great Resignation.”
  • Preferences between in-person and remote work continue to dictate employment decisions.
  • This page will help you decide if it’s time to get a new job and how to apply.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Work from home was supposed to be temporary.

But in the past 15 months, we’ve lived through a pandemic and a global recession, which led to mass burnout and a spike in voluntary resignations. This new normal means hybrid offices and awkward first encounters with coworkers.

One of the many changes 2021 has brought to the US job market – 9.2 million job openings. Job seekers have the advantage while on the hunt, but they need to know how to use it.

Navigating all the changes in our “work life” over the last year would make anyone’s head spin.

Here are five things any worker who feels they are struggling with should know when trying to excel in their career.

Remote work eliminated work-life balance, but some companies are looking to compensate

Mental Health
The pandemic did not just eliminate in-person socialization but also divisions between the home and office.

The pandemic transformed our living rooms into our office spaces – not the healthiest change for those who already struggled with taking their work home with them.

Burnout has left 61% of Americans feeling at least somewhat burnout and more than 80% have reported that COVID-19 has been a source of change in their lives. With the pandemic causing undue stress on everyone, an unhealthy office culture only adds to the pressure.

Employers need to lead the way in implementing wellness techniques that teach their employees how to care for themselves, take their PTO, and take advantage of flexible work environments.

Read more:

Americans don’t take nearly enough vacation days – and experts say it’s because companies think about PTO all wrong

A day off work and ‘Zoom-free Fridays’ aren’t going to cut it. Here’s how to really tackle burnout.

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

Burnout rates are rising. Zoom-free Fridays and $250,000 bonuses are the tip of the iceberg. Cisco is solving the problem by going deeper into its culture.

LinkedIn’s new VP of flex work shares 3 steps any company can use to create a hybrid work plan for all employees

If the last year has taught you anything, it’s that you have the freedom to leave

A orange sign with pink balloons reads "now hiring."
Workers are leaving their jobs in search of better pay and benefits.

For workers whose companies have failed to help prevent employee burnout, the pandemic has helped them realize one thing – it’s time to quit.

As millions willingly choose to walk away from their jobs, in what economists have coined the “Great Resignation,” some industries have been hit harder than others. In May, 5.3 million people voluntarily left their jobs.

Low pay and unreasonable working conditions across the retail, hospitality, and fast food businesses have created a crisis of, “rage quitting.” While it may feel good to walk out without notice, sometimes it is better to salvage professional connections.

Telling an employer you’re leaving is never easy, but it’s important to be candid.

Read More:

Americans say the pandemic is changing their personalities – and managers need to take notice or risk losing people

Employees are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Here’s how to tell if you’re losing people for the right reasons.

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Expert advice to guide you in the job hunt

Whether it be because of recession or resignation, a lot of candidates are on the job hunt.

Searching for a new role can be intimidating, but job seekers should always start by identifying which industries are hiring and what connections they have within them. After finding the job posting of your dreams it’s all about perfecting your résumé, cover letter, and interview techniques.

Never underestimate the need to customize your application for every job posting – learn from the experts about how to stand out as the pool of job seekers grows.

Read More:

Use this email template from a LinkedIn career expert to network and find a new job

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

Headed to a job interview? These are the red flags to look for that indicate a company’s culture won’t be right for you

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Tips and tricks to help you land a coveted remote job

Work from home
“Work from home” has become “work from anywhere” and many employees want the change to stick.

As lockdown dragged on, people were eager to return to in-person socialization, but the same can’t be said for in-person work.

Freelancers and remote workers were quick to open their inboxes to provide their years of expertise to “conventional workers” who had to quickly set up home offices and adjust to Zoom meetings. And some vacation hotspots welcomed remote workers to bring their laptops and soak up the sun and WiFi.

For those who have been sold on remote work, staying at a company that is committed to providing flexibility is a priority. While many companies – such as Apple, Indeed, and Airbnb – have extended their work from home policies through much of 2021, finding a company that is committed to the practice permanently can be difficult. And the demand is high.

To set yourself up for success, learn what companies are hiring remote workers, how to talk to your boss about working from home, and what can make you stand out when applying for a remote job.

Read More:

This chart shows the type of jobs that are still working from home

The city with the most high-paying jobs isn’t a city – it’s remote work. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

For those who plan to return to the office, new challenges are arising

A male-presenting and female-presenting coworkers bump elbows while walking past each other in an office.
As offices reopen across the country, in-person office culture slowly returns.

Some employees are eager and nervous to see their coworkers face to face.

But spending over a year using your bed as a midday nap spot makes the transition to a populated office space even more difficult – especially if you’ve never even met your team.

While the change to working in an office again can be intimidating, for some workers it may be exactly what they need to get a break from hectic households and reconnect with their passions.

Read More:

Should you work from home or the office? An HR chief outlines her 3-step framework

7 couples confess how WFH changed their romantic relationships, how they handled unexpected tensions, and what happens now

Feeling burned out? It might be time to return to the office.

Meeting your colleagues IRL for the first time? Here are 6 ways to squash the anxiety and make a good impression.

Read the original article on Business Insider

10 ways to manage stress and stay calm under pressure as a business leader

stress migraine
Overloading your mind with too many to-dos can lead to burnout and emotional outbursts.

  • Business leaders can use certain techniques to minimize stress and burnout at work.
  • Managing your daily workload, practicing delegation, and scheduling downtime can help reduce anxiety.
  • Building supportive professional relationships can also help leaders avoid being short-tempered and prone to outbursts.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

One of the most valuable attributes of a good business professional and leader is to be able to control emotional outbursts, to maximize your credibility and respect, and to maintain your own health.

The best of you train yourselves to show emotions sparingly and strategically, while the rest are convinced that emotions cannot be controlled, and are a function of culture and genetics.

Based on my own many years as a business executive and advisor, I have seen many professionals “mature” from hotheads to people who are cool and calm under pressure, becoming better leaders and decision makers in the process. 

With some coaching and mentoring from other leaders, I was able to do it myself. So I know you can do it too, by committing to the following strategies:

1. Train yourself to always look for positives, not negatives

Optimistic business leaders see value in every new business challenge, rather than stress and risk. You must recognize that change is the norm in business, so problems represent opportunities to learn something new, and improve your productivity and the competitiveness of the business.

2. Write down your top five core values and review them often

Pressure and emotion in business is often an indication of core value conflicts. Once you see and understand the conflict, it’s easier to make a decision, respond rationally, or simply remove yourself from the role. Don’t try to be someone you aren’t, or be everything to everyone.

3. Create a short to-do list at the beginning of each day

A mind overloaded with a large and growing list of critical items is not efficient, and will always be prone to burnout and emotional outbursts. I recommend a three-item high-priority list for focus. Then limit the external interruptions, so you can comfortably and effectively address each one, and more.

4. Practice delegation and decline unreasonable requests

Learn how to courteously turn back requests outside your realm of responsibility, and recommend others who may be more qualified. The most respected business leaders know their limitations, and are not afraid to admit them. Do the same for any commitments to the community and family.

5. Never schedule more than 80% of your time

Pressure and emotion become dominant when your schedule is overloaded, or too many predictable interruptions occur. Of course, most professionals are optimistic, so they tend to over-commit and underestimate work requirements. We all need a buffer to handle those special cases.

6. Put more focus on building the right relationships

Since business is generally not rocket science, relationships with peers, partners, and customers are often more important than skills. Find time in your work schedule for networking, working lunches, and business conferences, where you can test your ideas, learn, and generate support.

7. Define a clear break between work and private activities

Practice a ritual, such as a cup of coffee with a peer, to define your workday beginning, and maybe tea with your spouse to reset to family time. Then diligently don’t let these worlds intrude on each other, except in emergencies. Use the transition to reset stress pressures and emotions.

8. Never use emotion as a substitute for preparation

Effective business professionals always prepare for tough issues and key meetings by doing their own research and getting early counsel from experts and coaches. Not only do they do the homework, but they prepare mentally and physically to be at their best, rather than on the edge.

9. Take satisfaction from wins to balance against setbacks

No one in business wins every battle, so frustration on any issue needs to be offset by other wins and achieving incremental thresholds along the way. For most of us, this requires setting aside some contemplative time on a daily basis to measure key item progress and enjoy small wins.

10. Maintain at least one non-work passion for energy balance

Everyone needs a focus outside of work, such as a hobby, exercise regimen, or sports, to grant relief from work pressures and reset emotions. Emotional outbursts and losing one’s cool are often indicative of burnouts and pending meltdowns. Spread your energy to family as well as work.
 
Don’t let anyone tell you that what you can accomplish is limited by your culture or old habits. Everyone has the ability to control their own actions and emotions, which I find to be the keys to success in most business roles.

I encourage you to learn and practice the strategies outlined here, to minimize stress, and enjoy the journey as well as the destination.

Read the original article on Business Insider