Why you should offer interviews to applicants with gaps in their résumés

Man traveling Azores Portugal
Having come from a non-academic family, I certainly wouldn’t have dared to leave any gaps in my résumé before my first job in a local newsroom.

  • Gaps on your résumé often mean life experience but many people are scared to take time out.
  • I dropped out of my university degree and later left a company job but it made me a better worker.
  • Recruiters should view résumé gaps with curiosity and be more concerned when people don’t have any.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In between jobs, I’ve chased magic swords. A friend of mine traveled through Vietnam and Thailand. Another spent time taking care of her family and one enjoyed the summer doing nothing at all.

From a human perspective, a gap in your résumé is obviously a good thing – you’ve spent that time having pizza for breakfast, entertaining clever thoughts, learning Spanish vocabulary, or devouring all seven Harry Potter books.

Gaps in your résumé mean freedom and freedom takes courage.

I’m in my mid-30s now, but from 1992 to 2008 when I was preparing for working life, I feared the résumé gap. Career advisors taught us to see them as the death knell to our careers.

“People will ask about it,” we were warned. “And what are you going to say?”

Having come from a non-academic family, I certainly wouldn’t have dared to leave any gaps in my résumé before my first job in a local newsroom.

The fear of plunging myself into “economic ruin” would’ve plagued me and I would’ve been afraid of how I’d justify myself in job interviews – and whether I’d even be able to respond to the dreaded question.

teen playing desktop computer game with headphones graphics
I dropped out of a university degree and spent my days playing computer games.

But now, my advice to anyone with a résumé gap would be to answer boldly.

I dropped out of a university degree and spent my days playing computer games until I finally got a place on a different program. Although that might not seem like a good use of my time, it taught me a very important lesson – if something doesn’t work for me, I have to change it.

At that point, it was my degree, and later on, it was a company I was working for. Both times, it’s been worth it because I’ve been able to better evaluate my situation and think about my skills and what I really want. My life has improved as a result and I’ve become a better worker.

“I don’t have any gaps on my résumé,” one of my acquaintances wrote to me once. “And I regret it.”

The people I know who do have those gaps have told me they took the time off to recover from mental health issues. Many of them decided they wanted to work for themselves during their breaks, and a lot of them have made it happen.

What people learn during their time off from their careers gives them the freedom to think differently and maybe even better. Admitting that is tough because it goes against our ideas about the “ideal worker.”

That’s precisely the problem. What society demands of professionals today isn’t sustainable anymore, or even relevant. If you do your job well only when it works for you, then you are one thing above all else: replaceable.

People do lots of things in their jobs. They develop ideas, help people, solve problems, manage the chaos behind the scenes at large institutions, tackle climate change, teach, calculate, heal, and program.

black woman hiking
Gaps on your résumé often mean you’ve got life experience.

We’re not always equally good at those things and gaps tend to help us improve our performance. We need to remember life isn’t a machine and people aren’t cogs – life is complex.

If we don’t incorporate that into our lifestyles and into our work, then ultimately there won’t be anyone left who can develop the ideas to accommodate our complex lives.

However, gaps are scary. One of my friends is currently looking for a job but she’s scared to spread the word through her networks, whether professional or personal. I think that’s a fatal error.

If we all had the courage to leave gaps in our résumés and if recruiters approached gaps with curiosity rather than apprehension, the world of work would radically change.

Even taking parental leave is considered a “gap” in your résumé – a career inhibitor or something you shouldn’t allow yourself.

The truth is that work experience rarely makes us discover anything about life. We only get that through life experiences.

That’s why I think recruiters should be more concerned when someone comes into an interview without a gap in their résumé.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How 11 women in science are working to combat the spread of COVID-19

Sara Bertran de Lis
A number of women are at the forefront of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Female scientists are changing the game when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • From reducing mortality by 50% to studying virus replication, they may be able to end the pandemic.
  • For International Women’s Day, here are 11 women at the forefront of COVID-19 response. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A number of women are at the forefront of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, both at a Spanish and global level – from the first female president of the Spanish National Research Council to a researcher whose work in AI could reduce COVID-19 mortality by 50%.

In 2017, women occupied just 24% of STEM jobs.

While that percentage is slowly changing, there remain prominent gender gaps in STEM fields and women face more challenges than men in these sectors.

A study of 194 countries released last year suggested women-led countries handled the pandemic better than those led by men – and they’ve also played key roles in revolutionizing the pandemic response.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, here are 11 Spanish women who could hold the key to tackling COVID-19.

Sánchez-Felipe is researching a single-dose vaccine for long-term protection

lorena sanchez felipe 2239503
Sánchez-Felipe believes her vaccine could be especially vital in countries where yellow fever is still a problem.

Spanish researcher Lorena Sánchez-Felipe is working at the Rega Institute in Leuven, Belgium, to develop a vaccine that could change the course of the pandemic.

Her research group is creating a vaccine based on the yellow fever vaccine which carries a coronavirus antigen to train the immune system to recognize it. Sánchez-Felipe’s vaccine would protect people against both yellow fever and COVID-19.

She believes her vaccine could be especially vital in countries where yellow fever is still a problem and will also protect against COVID-19 in the long-term.

“We expect long-term immunity, given previous results we’ve seen with this type of vaccine,” Sánchez-Felipe told Business Insider España.

 

Sola is working on developing a COVID-19 vaccine in Spain

Isabel Sola
Isabel Sola has spent years researching the coronavirus family of infections.

Senior scientist and co-director of the coronavirus laboratory at the National Center for Biotechnology at the Spanish National Research Council, Isabel Sola, has spent years researching the coronavirus family of infections.

Sola is now working to develop a vaccine based on a smallpox virus and is created using a virus that has been genetically modified to retain its reproduction properties. It thus goes from cell to cell with a controlled dose acting as a vector.

“From our experience with similar coronaviruses, this vaccine is 100% effective,” Sola told Business Insider España.

 

Del Val is a virologist and coordinates the Global Health platform

Margarita del Val
Margarita del Val has been one of the most visible faces of the pandemic response in Spain.

Spanish National Research Council virologist Margarita del Val has been one of the most visible faces of the pandemic response in Spain.

The expert coordinates the 150 teams brought together by the council on a large multidisciplinary research platform called “Global Health.”

Among the tasks carried out by the platform are the improvement of COVID-19 diagnostic systems, and they have pioneered a system for testing wastewater to identify whether the virus is spreading in a community.

Del Val has also been carrying out educational work during the pandemic and has warned of the need to be cautious about future possible waves and other pandemics.

 

Fernández-Sesma researches immune responses to COVID-19

Screenshot 2021 03 08 at 14.06.15
Ana Fernández-Sesma is one of the five best-funded researchers by the National Institute of Health.

Ana Fernández-Sesma directs a laboratory at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York which studies how certain types of viruses modulate our immune system, with a special focus on dengue.

The research she conducts on dengue places her among the five best-funded researchers by the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the United States.

Fernández-Sesma told Business Insider España she aims to understand “what the virus does to evade barriers in a host and how the host protects itself.” Uncovering this could change the pandemic response, as our immune response to the virus has still not been fully understood.

She has also joined a group of researchers evaluating the immune system’s response to the virus in an effort to understand how it differs among patients.

 

Oliver is an AI expert working on predicting the evolution of the pandemic

Nuria Oliver
Nuria Oliver has established herself as one of the world’s leading artificial intelligence experts.

Nuria Oliver has established herself as one of the world’s leading artificial intelligence experts. In her capacity as authority-appointed high commissioner for AI in Valencia.

Oliver works with a research group that tries to communicate the real data of the pandemic to those in charge of making decisions.

The group tries to predict the behavior of the virus using different potential scenarios, answering key questions like how many people will be infected and modeling human mobility.

During the 2009 influenza pandemic in Mexico, Oliver analyzed aggregate data from cell phone networks to investigate the effectiveness of government measures.

She also spearheaded a macro-survey to assess the impact of the measures adopted during lockdown that has warned of the increased socialization in risky environments.

Marco leads a project that focuses on preparing for subsequent waves

Pilar Marco
Marco leads a team researching devices that can detect biomarkers of COVID-19 infection.

Spanish National Research Council professor Pilar Marco is the head of Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics (Nb4D). The tool could revolutionize the pandemic response.

Marco leads a team researching devices that can simultaneously and rapidly detect several biomarkers of COVID-19 infection.

These quick detection diagnostic systems could prepare the world better for any future outbreaks of COVID-19.

Rodríguez is improving diagnoses and treatments through AI at IBM

Screenshot 2021 03 08 at 14.11.44
The computational biologist works with IBM.

Astrophysics and cosmology specialist María Rodriguez uses her knowledge of quantitative technical tools to help doctors provide better diagnoses and suggest individual treatments.

The computational biologist works with IBM applying artificial intelligence to the healthcare sector, focusing on integrating high-throughput molecular datasets to build comprehensive models of disease.

This sector could transform the treatment of cancer and immune and degenerative diseases, Rodriguez told Business Insider España.

García Vidal is working on an AI solution that could cut mortality in COVID-19 patients by 50%

Screenshot 2021 03 08 at 14.13.22
García Vidal’s technique could reduce patient mortality rates by 50%.

Head of the Covid Digital Control Center at the Hospital Clínic in Barcelona, Dr. Carolina García Vidal, is leading one of the 207 projects named by the European Institute of Innovation as providing a better response to the healthcare crisis.

García Vidal’s initiative uses artificial intelligence to monitor the evolution of patient systems, anticipating the worsening of the disease.

Her technique could reduce patient mortality rates by 50% according to findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Silleras became a developer to fight the pandemic

Screenshot 2021 03 08 at 14.14.32
Rocío Silleras was one of 40 students selected for the final part of Samsung’s DesarrollAdoras course.

Rocío Silleras was one of 40 students selected for the final part of Samsung’s DesarrollAdoras course, focused on artificial intelligence and big data.

After the program, Silleras joined the multidisciplinary team led by Dr. Joaquín López Herraiz, from the Universidad Computense de Madrid.

The team was tackling the development of a tool to identify infectious diseases.

Their project, which won the UNESCO hackathon #CodeTheCurve, studies X-rays with artificial intelligence to detect COVID-19.

Bertrán de Lis is a data scientist at Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact

Sara Bertran de Lis
Data scientist Sara Bertrán de Lis works at the John Hopkins University Civic Impact Center.

Data scientist Sara Bertrán de Lis works at the John Hopkins University Civic Impact Center and previously worked as a trainee at the European Space Agency.

Bertrán de Lis works on collecting data as part of a map that acts as an international reference for analyzing the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Rosa Menéndez is the first female president of the Spanish National Research Council

Rosa Menendez
Rosa Menéndez became the first female president in the 80-year history of the Spanish National Research Council.

In 2017, Rosa Menéndez became the first female president in the 80-year history of the Spanish National Research Council.

An organic chemistry graduate from the University of Oviedo, Menéndez is confident that the council will produce the first Spanish vaccine to fight COVID-19, with reports suggesting it could be ready by the end of 2022.

Read the original article on Business Insider