How to watch swimming at the Tokyo Olympics – the qualifying heats begin on July 24

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Katie Ledecky
Olympic swimming events will be broadcast live on NBC and USA.

  • Tokyo Olympic swimming events start on July 24 and conclude July 31.
  • Swimming events will air on USA and NBC via live TV streaming services.
  • On the USA team, expectations are high for Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel.

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Swimming events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics start on July 24 and continue daily until July 31. Live coverage will be broadcast on NBC and the USA network.

The USA team has several strong competitors in women’s and men’s divisions, but all eyes will be on Katie Ledecky when she gets in the water. Ledecky already has an impressive collection of five gold medals and one silver medal coming into the Tokyo Olympics. If she snags three more gold medals in Tokyo, Ledecky will tie swimming legend Jenny Thompson as the winningest female US Olympian of all time.

In the men’s division, Caeleb Dressel is expected to lead the pack after his impressive showing at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Dressel earned two gold medals during the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

How to watch Olympic swimming

Live broadcasts of Olympic swimming events are split between two channels: USA and NBC. For both men’s and women’s events, you can watch the preliminary heats on USA and the finals on NBC. Swimming heats will air in the mornings starting around 6 a.m. ET, and final races will air later in the evening during primetime coverage.

If you already have access to NBC and USA through a pay-TV provider, you can also stream every swimming event live via the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com.

If you don’t have cable, you can get NBC and USA through a variety of live TV streaming services. Sling TV is the cheapest subscription service for watching all the Olympic swimming events. New members can get their first month for just $10 (regularly $35). NBC is only offered in select markets, however, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, and YouTube TV are additional live streaming services with access to both channels for watching Olympic swimming, but these options are more expensive at $65/month each.

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Viewers who can’t tune into events live can stay caught up on the action by catching highlights and primetime coverage on NBC. For free swimming highlights and videos from additional Olympic events, you can download the Peacock app or visit NBCOlympics.com.

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Men’s Olympic swimming schedule

Caeleb Dresse stands during Olympic trials in 2021.
Caeleb Dressel.

July 24

Event Time Channel
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 7:55 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 9:52 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:33 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:22 a.m. ET USA
100m Backstroke (Heats) 7:19 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:10 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:31 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:05 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:29 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:43 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:17 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Heats) 7:37 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 9:49 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:21 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:26 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
200m Backstroke (Heats) 6:25 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:15 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:04 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 10:37 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 11:08 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:16 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:50 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:11 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC

Women’s Olympic swimming schedule

Katie Ledecky at the 2021 Olympic Trials
Katie Ledecky.

July 24

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:30 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:15 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:40 p.m. ET NBC
400m Individual Medley (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
100m Backstroke (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:59 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 7:39 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 10:20 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:53 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:56 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 7:32 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:51 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:17 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 10:58 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:57 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:52 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:34 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:53 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 10:28 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:31 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
800m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Heats) 7:08 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:24 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:36 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:46 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:32 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC
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Sling TV is the cheapest way to watch the Olympics without cable

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Everything you need to know about SlingTV 2x1
Sling TV is giving all subscribers free access to the Olympic Channel during Tokyo 2020.

  • If you want to watch the Olympics without cable, Sling TV is one of your cheapest options.
  • New subscribers can get their first month of Sling’s Blue plan for just $10 (normally $35/month).
  • NBC, NBCSN, and USA are all included on Sling Blue, and the Olympic Channel is free through August 8.

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The Tokyo 2020 Olympics have arrived, and if you’re looking for a way to watch the games without signing up for a pricey cable service, Sling TV is offering special deals for new and returning subscribers throughout the Olympics.

New Sling TV subscribers can get their first month of Sling Blue for just $10 – a $25 discount from the full $35/month price. Sling TV is also making the Olympic Channel and NBC Universo free to all subscribers. Those channels usually require additional packages for an extra fee. The Olympic Channel is free through August 8, while Universo is free through September 5.

Certain Olympic events will air on CNBC, which costs $6 with Sling’s news extra package. If you’re interested in watching Olympic golf, you’ll have to add the sports extra package for the Golf Channel.

All together, new Sling TV subscribers can get every channel needed to watch the Olympics for $27 during their first month of service, while current subscribers will pay $52.

How to watch the Olympics on Sling TV

To watch all of NBC’s coverage of the Olympics on Sling TV you’ll need to sign up for Sling Blue, the Sling news extra package, and Sling’s sports extra package. This will get you live TV access to NBC, NBC Sports, USA, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and NBC Universo.

Sling Blue costs $35/month. New members can get their first month for $10. Sling’s news extra package costs $6/month, and the sports extra package costs $11/month. This brings the total price to $27 for new members for their first month, or $52 a month for existing members.

Access to NBC will be based on your local affiliate station and support is only available in select markets. You can check whether your local NBC network is available on Sling here.

Sling Blue comes with 50 hours of DVR space to record live TV, and up to three devices can watch at the same time with a single account. The Sling TV app is available on most streaming TV platforms, including Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Android devices, and Chromecast. You can also download the app on LG and Samsung smart TVs, and Xbox consoles. On your phone or computer you can watch Sling via Sling.com.

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What else can I watch on Sling TV?

Sling TV Blue, the package needed for Olympic networks like NBC Sports and USA, offers a wide range of live TV channels, including the NFL Network, TNT, the Food Network, Comedy Central, and the Fox family of networks.

Sling features on-demand content like movies and classic TV shows from select channels as well. You can find a full breakdown of Sling TV channels and packages here.

Other ways to watch the Olympics

If you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s various channels, you can use your account information to stream every Olympic event online via the NBC Sports app or the NBCOlympics website. You can also visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule with specific channel information for each event.

NBC’s streaming service, Peacock, will also feature daily highlights, docuseries, and commentary for free. Peacock is available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs. You can read more about how to follow the Olympics on our main hub.

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How to watch basketball at the Tokyo Olympics, including the new 3-on-3 tournament

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Kevin Durant dribbles for USA Basketball.
Kevin Durant is one of the many NBA stars playing in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

  • The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature men’s and women’s tournaments for 5-on-5 and 3-on-3 basketball.
  • Olympic basketball games will be spread across NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.
  • The NBC sports app will stream every game, and US men’s games will also stream live on Peacock ($5/month).

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The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature professional basketball players from the top international leagues as well as the debut of 3-on-3 events, an Olympic first. Twelve nations have qualified for the traditional men’s and women’s 5-on-5 tournaments, while eight teams will play in men’s and women’s 3-on-3 events.

Players from the NBA, WNBA and other professional basketball leagues from around the world will compete in the 5-on-5 tournament. The US men’s team, a perennial favorite, is led by stars like Kevin Durant and Damian Lillard, but they’ll have to face top international talent like Rudy Gobert of France and Luka Doncic of Slovenia. The US women’s basketball team has won six consecutive Olympic gold medals dating back to 1996. This year’s squad is led by stars like Diana Taurasi, Breanna Stewart, and Brittney Griner.

The 3-on-3 basketball events will use a different format than traditional basketball, with shots being counted as one and two points, rather than two and three points. Teams win by scoring 21 points, or by leading after 10 minutes.

The 3-on-3 teams will play each other in a round-robin format to determine seeding for the medal tournament. The 5-on-5 teams are separated into three groups for match play leading to a final tournament.

How to watch Olympic basketball

Nigeria's Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States' Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade
Nigeria’s Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States’ Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women’s Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade.

Olympic basketball coverage begins with 3-on-3 events on July 23; 5-on-5 match play begins on July 24. To watch Olympic basketball you’ll need access to NBC’s family of networks. Select games will air on NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.

If you already subscribe to a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s channels, you can stream all Olympic basketball events through the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com. This is the best way to catch all the action live, as a lot of the broadcast coverage will be shown as replays.

In addition, all US men’s basketball games will be streamed live on Peacock Premium, NBC’s standalone streaming service. Peacock Premium starts at $5 a month for ad-supported streaming.

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If you’re not already subscribed to NBC channels through your cable provider, you can sign up for a live TV streaming service to follow Olympic basketball online.

Sling TV is one of the most affordable options, starting at $35 a month for Sling Blue with NBC, NBC Sports, and USA ($10 for new subscribers), and an additional $17 for CNBC and the Olympic Channel, which require extra sports and news packages. That’s $52 in total, or $27 if you’re a new Sling subscriber.

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Other live TV options – like YouTube TV, FuboTV, and Hulu + Live TV – also include access to the necessary NBC stations but, while they all feature more channels than Sling, they’re also more expensive with prices starting at $65/month each. If you’re just signing up to watch the Tokyo Games, Sling is a more economical option.

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Men’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Kevin Durant of Team USA
Draymond Green and Kevin Durant of Team USA basketball.

July 25

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. France (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 12 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
Argentina vs. Slovenia (Group C) 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
Australia vs. Italy (Group B) 11:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 3 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
France vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 5:15 p.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 11:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Australia vs. Germany (Group B) 10:30 a.m. ET USA

August 1

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 1:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 2

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 12:15 a.m. ET Peacock

August 5

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 6 p.m. ET (replay) USA
Men’s semifinals 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 10:30 p.m. ET NBC, Peacock

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 8

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 1:30 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

Women’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird for Team USA.
Diana Taurasi (left) and Sue Bird compete for Team USA.

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET USA
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 2:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay) USA

July 30

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET

USA

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 8 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
Canada vs. Spain (Group A) 11:30 p.m. p.m. ET USA

August 2

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group B) 12:40 a.m. ET USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 4 p.m. ET (replay) USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals 6 p.m. ET on (replay) USA
Women’s quarterfinals 10 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals 10 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals 4:15 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 8 p.m. ET NBC

August 8

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 9 a.m. ET (replay) USA

3-on-3 Olympic basketball schedule

3x3 basketball
A 3×3 basketball test event in Japan in May 2021.

July 24

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 12:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
US vs. Mongolia and US vs. France 8 p.m. ET CNBC
Basketball and archery elimination rounds 10:40 p.m. ET USA

July 25

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 4 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan 4 a.m. ET CNBC
Men’s and women’s pool play 6:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s semifinals games 5:30 a.m. ET USA
Gold and bronze medal games 8 p.m. ET NBC Sports
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The 10 US colleges best-represented at the Tokyo Olympic Games

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI - JUNE 27: Jordan Chiles competes on the uneven bars during the Women's competition of the 2021 U.S. Gymnastics Olympic Trials at America’s Center on June 27, 2021 in St Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images)
First-time Olympic gymnast Jordan Chiles is also an incoming freshman at UCLA.

  • Polina Marinova is the founder of The Profile, a newsletter that profiles successful people and companies.
  • The following is a recent The Profile post, republished here with permission.
  • In it, she breaks down the top 10 US colleges that are sending the most alumni and athletes to the 2020 Olympics.

In March of 2020, Brooke Forde packed up and left campus as Stanford University and colleges around the nation paused in-person classes due to a global pandemic.

Then, she found out something else was being put on hold: The 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Forde, a student at Stanford, had also been a first-time Olympic hopeful. The last few months have served as a stress test for the 22-year-old swimmer, whose road to Tokyo has anything but straightforward. She overcame two COVID-19 scares, a mid-meet panic attack, and a nerve-wracking Olympic Trials experience.

Despite it all, she ultimately secured a spot on Team USA at the Olympic Games and got to say: “I’m Brooke Forde, and I’m a Tokyo Olympian.”

Joining her in Tokyo will be 31 other current and former Stanford athletes – among them swimmers Katie Ledecky, Simone Manuel, Torri Huske, and Regan Smith.

Stanford students and alumni will participate in swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, volleyball, gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, and track & field this year, according to information provided to The Profile by the US Olympic Committee.

The university has produced at least one medalist in every Olympics in which the US has competed since 1912, including a school-record 27 medals in 2016.

More than 75% of the 2020 US Olympic team competed in collegiate athletics at the varsity and club levels.

Here are the 10 US colleges that will be best-represented at the Olympic Games:

(Note: This list includes athletes who have already finished their collegiate careers, those currently competing, and incomers who have signed National Letters of Intent. If an athlete competed at two different schools, they have been counted at the school they have most recently attended.)

10. University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame.
University of Notre Dame.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Fencing, basketball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Mariel Zagunis, a Notre Dame alumna, is the most decorated US fencer of all time. A two-time Olympic gold medalist, Zagunis will embark on her fifth consecutive trip to the Olympics this year.

“I’ve done a lot for my sport already,” she said. “I’m not trying to prove anything to anybody except to myself that I’m still a good fencer and I’m capable of beating the best in the world and becoming Olympic champion once again.”

Read a profile on Zagunis here.

9. Penn State University

Penn State University
Penn State University.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Soccer, fencing, wrestling, volleyball, rugby, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: When she was growing up, Alyssa Naeher had dreams of making it to the WNBA.

“If I’m being honest, basketball was my first love,” said Naeher, an ’09 Penn State graduate. “I wanted to play basketball at UConn. We obviously didn’t really have a [pro women’s soccer league] of our own yet.”

Today, Naeher has channeled that same passion into become a confident and record-setting goalkeeper for the Chicago Red Stars and United States Women’s National Soccer Team. “The only thing I can control is my effort on the field – working hard, keeping my head down, being there, pushing myself, pushing my teammates, and trying to get better,” she said.

Read a profile on Naeher here.

8. University of Oregon

University of Oregon
University of Oregon.

Number of athletes: 11

Events: Softball, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Freshman Micah Williams is University of Oregon’s star sprinter. He has already won a national indoor championship after tying a school record with a 60-meter time of 6.49 seconds. Williams and fellow Olympian Cravon Gillespie became the first Oregon men’s sprinters in program history to make the US Olympic team.

Read a profile on Williams here.

7. University of Florida

University of Florida campus

Number of athletes: 14

Events: Softball, basketball, swimming, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Caeleb Dressel has been called “swimming’s reluctant star” for a reason. Dressel constantly draws comparisons to legendary Olympian Michael Phelps, and he couldn’t be less interested in external expectations or comparisons.

“I swim different events than Michael,” he said. “I’m not chasing someone else’s goals. I want to chase my own.”

Dressel, who graduated from the University of Florida in 2018, has claimed 15 world championship medals, 13 of them gold, since 2017, making him one of the biggest stars in swimming. At the Tokyo Olympics, he is a favorite to win six gold medals for Team USA.

Read a profile of Dressel here.

6. University of Georgia

University of Georgia
The University of Georgia.

Number of athletes: 15

Events: Swimming and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Swimmer Allison Schmitt is an eight-time Olympic medalist with four golds, two silvers, and two bronzes. Schmitt qualified for her fourth Olympics, which puts her at one short of the record for American women’s swimming.

Schmitt, who graduated from the University of Georgia in 2013, said, “This one is definitely the most emotional, and I think it’s special to be here at 31 [years old] and have everyone in the stands that’s here supporting me … and have been along on this journey the past four years.”

Read a profile on Schmitt here.

5. University of Southern California

usc
The statue called ‘Tommy Trojan’, the mascot of USC from 1930 located at the center of the USC campus on September 23, 2015, three weeks before the USC announced they have fired Trojans football coach Steve Sarkisian.

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Water polo, swimming, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Isaiah Jewett may be a track star at USC, but he’s also a student who needs to complete his homework. In June, he qualified for his first Olympic Games after finishing second in the men’s 800-meter run. In his post-race press conference, he revealed that although he was excited, he was also really worried about completing his 10-page paper that was due in just a few hours.

“My legs feel really good. Mentally I’m tired. I need to sleep. I have a 10-page essay due tonight,” he said. “I’m mentally trying to re-focus and get that done because it’s due tonight and my teacher didn’t give me an extension.” He submitted his paper at 11:50 p.m. that night.

Read a profile on Jewett here.

4. University of California, Berkeley

UC Berkeley cover image
UC Berkeley campus

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Swimming, water polo, rowing, soccer, golf, rugby, table tennis, and softball

Athlete Spotlight: Twenty-four-year-old Collin Morikawa has already made history. Earlier this month, he became the first golfer in history to win his debut at two different major events. Additionally, he became the eighth golfer ever to win two majors before turning 25. More so than anything, Morikawa is really charismatic.

Here’s how writer Kyle Porter described him: “He’s clean-cut and buttoned-up. He’s fresh and likable. He has not made any public mistakes nor had to watch himself suffer.” Morikawa is considered one of the top US golfers set to compete at the Olympics. This ’19 Cal graduate is definitely one to watch.

Read a profile on Morikawa here.

3. University of Texas

University of Texas
University of Texas

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Diving, swimming, rowing, basketball, softball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Windle, who is returning for a fifth year at the University of Texas, executed a near perfect dive during the Olympic trials. After three attempts at qualifying for the Olympic Games, Windle’s efforts finally paid off. Windle has a long history of not giving up, though.

Born in Cambodia, Windle was placed in an orphanage about a year after his parents died tragically. Meanwhile, a retired naval officer named Jerry Windle wanted to start a family but struggled to adopt as a single, gay man in the US He read about someone who had adopted a child from Cambodia, and five months later, he found and adopted Jordan, who had been suffering from malnutrition, scabies, intestinal parasites and severe infections. Today, the father-son duo are inseparable.

“I hope that Jordan’s story, our story, inspires people to give children the opportunity to do amazing things,” Jerry said.

Read a profile on Windle here.

2. UCLA

UCLA

Number of athletes: 21

Events: Gymnastics, soccer, softball, baseball, basketball, tennis, volleyball (court), beach volleyball, and water polo

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Chiles has a lot going on in 2021. She is an incoming freshman at UCLA, and she’s also a first-time Olympian competing alongside teammates including gymnastics legend Simone Biles. Chiles is expected to be a Tokyo breakout star three years after nearly quitting gymnastics.

“I didn’t think the sport wanted me anymore,” she said. “So I went in the opposite direction.” She had lost all confidence and motivation – until she had a talk with Biles. Biles took on the role of Chiles’s big sister, repeating to her these three words: “You belong here.”

Read a profile on Chiles here.

1. Stanford University

Stanford University

Number of athletes: 32

Events: Swimming, artistic swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: At the 2016 Olympics, Katie Ledecky was an incoming freshman at Stanford University. In 2021, she’s a recent grad with a degree in psychology and a total of six Olympic medals (five gold, one silver). In the last year, the 24-year-old competitive swimmer has done more solo training than ever before. It makes the already unusual run-up to the Tokyo Olympics even more so for the most dominant swimmer on the planet.

“The most important expectations are the ones that I have for myself,” she said. “I do a pretty good job of sticking to those and not seeing what kinds of medal counts or times that people are throwing out about what I could accomplish if everything goes perfectly.”

Read a profile on Ledecky here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 7 best compression socks of 2021 for runners, seniors, and anyone looking to improve circulation

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  • Compression socks help speed muscle recovery and potentially improve athletic performance.
  • They also improve blood flow for venous or lymphatic issues for pregnant women or the elderly.
  • Our top pick, CEP’s Progressive+ Compression Socks, are incredibly comfortable and won’t sag throughout the day.

Compression socks are one of those garments that seem gimmicky but science actually backs up their biggest claimed benefit: Improving your circulation.

“Compression socks help the vascular system move blood and other fluids, which can help manage swelling and inflammation,” Jenelle Deatherage, a physical therapist at the UW Health Sports Rehabilitation Clinic, told Insider.

At their foundation, compression socks work by squeezing the walls of the veins and leg tissues to help blood work its way against gravity to the heart. The compression also improves the flow of lymph fluid, which helps remove cellular waste and circulates bacteria-fighting white blood cells throughout your body.

Deatherage added that several categories of people may benefit from wearing compression socks, including athletes who could look to enhance their workouts. This is especially true for runners.

“There’s not great research on performance, which is what a lot of patients look for, but the good news is that there is some research that shows [compression socks] might help with muscle fatigue and reduce soreness if you wear them during a workout,” she explained.

Because of those benefits, compression socks have become quite popular recently – and that popularity brought with it a surplus of options. To help narrow down what’s available, we tested dozens of styles across brands like Swiftwick, CEP, and Sockwell. Our guide features socks that provide great comfort, are relatively durable, and are fit to wear in a variety of situations.

At the end of this guide, we’ve also included some insight into who Detherage says may benefit most from compression socks, tips on how to shop for them, and the best methods for how to use and wear them.

Here are the best compression socks:

How we test compression socks

The compression socks featured in this guide each went through a series of on-foot tests to see how well they compared across these four categories: Fit, function, durability, and value. Here’s how each category specifically factored into how we tested each pair of compression socks and how it influenced which made this guide:

Fit: A compression sock is far more able to perform its primary function if it fits the wearer properly, both in terms of the actual size as well as how well it stays fitted throughout the day. To test for this, we judged how true-to-size the socks were and also looked at if they avoided sagging when worn for anywhere multiple hours in a row to a full day. 

Function: Most compression socks feature a compression rating that indicates how tight (or loose) they are, and their function is tied entirely to these ratings. A wearer’s needs may fluctuate wildly (and are certainly different from person-to-person), so to test this, we looked at how many size options and ratings each brand offered and if they catered to a wide range of needs. 

Durability: Compression socks aren’t often cheap per single pair, so it’s important that they’ll last – and for multiple months, at that. This meant stress testing the socks in environments they wouldn’t typically be worn to see how well they held up. If some faltered by sagging easily or tearing, then we knew they’d likely break down far quicker in the long run than we’d like.

Value: Testing the value of a compression sock takes more than just looking at its sticker price. Rather, true value is a combination of the above three categories plus how much it costs. We often think it’s better to spend more on a quality product that lasts as opposed to spending less more often. 

The best compression socks overall

compression socks

Whether you are a runner or just someone who wants to relieve lower leg ailments, the CEP Progressive+ Compression Run Socks 2.0 provides all-day comfort.

Pros: Incredibly comfortable, thinner, won’t sag over the course of the day

Cons: Expensive, sizing can be tricky so be sure to measure before ordering

The CEP Progressive+ Compression Run Socks 2.0 (available in men’s and women’s sizes) stand out from the other socks on our list due in large part to the fact they offer unparalleled comfort — and should be considered by anyone, despite a steep price tag. 

The brand’s parent company, Medi, has been producing medical compression products for over 70 years. The founder of CEP, who is an Ironman competitor, leveraged Medi’s technical knowledge and designs for athletes.

Made of polyamide and nylon (60%), elastane (25%), and polypropylene (15%), CEP’s socks offer precise 20-30mmHg graduated and consistent compression so they won’t sag as the day goes on.

The Progressive+ 2.0 Socks also feature a halo top band that lands right below the knee. This keeps your socks in place and the front ribbing allows air to flow through to cool your skin’s surface. Per CEP’s website, the company offers a six-month guarantee that covers wearing the socks up to 150 times before the compression lessens. 

These socks are recommended for anyone who suffers from shin splints, Achilles issues, or plantar fasciitis. They’re also great for runners looking to rehab their leg after a long run or workout. 

The best budget compression socks

compression socks

The SB Sox Lite Compression Socks are the least expensive pair in our guide, yet they stay up and provide reliable comfort.

Pros: Inexpensive, relatively durable, snug fit

Cons: Available in just two sizes

Though the SB Sox Lite Compression Socks are about one-fifth the price of our top pick, they rival it in performance. These socks have a graduated compression rating of 15-20mmHg, which is slightly less than the CEP socks but still supplies sufficient compression for blood circulation.

The socks are made of breathable and lightweight spandex and nylon, which helps to wick away sweat and moisture from your feet. SB Sox come in 11 different colors and two sizes: S/M and L/XL.

Though they seem thinner and lighter than other picks on this list, SB Sox socks hold up well through numerous wears and washes. Plus, they provide a snug fit that doesn’t feel too constricting. More sizing options would be welcome, though.

The best compression socks for circulation

sockwell

If you experience circulation problems due to chronic health issues, the Sockwell Elevation Graduated Compression Socks may be your best bet for achieving leg comfort.

Pros: Lightweight, maintain their snugness all day long

Cons: The top of the sock might warp over time, only comes in two sizes

For people with venous or lymphatic issues in their legs, compression therapy can help move blood through the veins and tissue better, which in turn promotes healing and prevents ulcers and other issues. Compression stockings are one of the easier options to put on and less cumbersome than medical bandages, says a 2014 study in CMAJ.

The Sockwell Elevation Graduated Compression Socks (available in men’s and women’s sizes) are made in the United States using bamboo rayon (31%), merino wool (31%), stretch nylon (30%), and spandex (8%). This combination helps with moisture management, thermoregulation, and odor control.

What’s more, these are one of the firmer pairs from Sockwell offering compression of 20-30mmHg. A 2019 study analysis in BMC Geriatrics found elderly folks with chronic blood flow issues (venous insufficiency) and swollen legs who wore class 2 compression stockings (pressure between 20 and 30 mmHg) regularly were less likely to have leg ulcers come back compared to wearing lower compression class 1 stockings (pressure below 20 mmHg).

These Sockwell socks have four zones of graduated compression beginning at the ankles and moving up. Since the compression starts at the ankles, the toes remain comfortable. There are four colors for men to choose from and eight in the women’s style.

The best compression socks for post-workout

compression socks 1

After running countless miles, slipping on a pair of Zensah Tech+ Compression Socks can decrease soreness and help your muscles recover.

Pros: Great for easing muscle soreness, cushioned bottom, durable, 4 sizes, 14 colors

Cons: Might not be tight enough for everyone’s needs, long drying time

The Zensah Tech+ Compression Socks come in four sizes, which is helpful for ensuring you get the right fit — the appropriate sock size gives you the appropriate level of pressure. Constructed of 82% polyamide and 18% elastane, these socks feature ultra-zone ribbing which targets ankle and arch stabilization, which is ideal for runners with weaknesses in these areas.

The 200 needle count construction is designed to make the socks denser, durable, and reduce stretching over time. They’re sweat-wicking, too, but don’t tend to dry out very quicky, so are best worn in cooler weather. Zensah offers the socks in 14 colors, including Black, Heather Grey, and Neon Pink. 

The best compression socks for runners

Aspire Socks

Swiftwick’s Aspire Twelve help relieve muscle soreness and prevent or relieve shin splints — something any runner can appreciate.

Pros: Offers comfortable compression for runners, promotes blood flow, helps relieve shin splints, and wicks away moisture

Cons: Can be difficult to put on

Swiftwick’s compression socks run the gamut of everything from knee-high versions for those looking for full leg relief to no-show options for golfers. For runners, its Aspire Twelve socks are an excellent option to help relieve muscle soreness, prevent or care for shin splints, and provide stability and comfort. 

Comprised of a blend of 43% nylon, 11% spandex, and 46% olefin, the Aspire Twelves don’t just offer the benefits of compression but also help wick away moisture to keep your feet dry. They work well to keep on even after your run as you’ll continue to reap the benefits of compression as you recover. 

The best compression socks for standing all-day

compression socks

If your job requires you to be on your feet for most of the day, give your lower legs a break with Sockwell’s Circulator Graduated Compression Socks.

Pros: Good for reducing foot and ankle swelling, incredibly comfortable, inexpensive

Cons: Concerns about durability, socks may only come up to mid-calf in taller people

The Sockwell Circulator Graduated Compression Socks have a lot of the same features as our pick for best circulation, the Sockwell Elevation socks. They both have four zones of graduated compression from the ankle on up, which keeps the toes feeling comfortable, and each is made of a combination of spandex, bamboo rayon, stretch nylon, and merino wool.

But the main differences are that the Circulator socks have moderate compression (15-20mmHg) and cost a bit less ($30 per pair).

The Circulator socks only come in two sizes. but there are nine colors to choose from, including Black Stripe, Charcoal, Black Solid, and Port. Regardless of the size, the socks aren’t very long, so they’re best used for people with shorter builds. 

The best patterned compression socks

Vim Vigr socks

Vim & Vigr combines form and function with its fashion-forward compression socks that you’ll just love to be seen in.

Pros: Stylish, comfortable, available for both men and women

Cons: Can get expensive

First and foremost, Vim & Vigr compression socks work. After all, no amount of aesthetic creativity would be able to make up for compression socks that don’t do much by way of compressing. Luckily, that’s not the case with these.

I’m particularly fond of Vim & Vigr’s medical-grade compression level, which are designed with a Gradient Knitting Technology to help promote circulation in your calves. The socks feature a structured leg but a flexible toe and heel so that you’re supported where you need it but still able to move. These socks offer moderate to firm compression, with somewhere between 20 and 30 mmHg depending on the style.

Regardless of your selection, however, you’ll find that Vim & Vigr helps to prevent swelling in your legs, and alleviates pain and achiness. I found that these socks were just as helpful during runs as they were during HIIT workouts — especially as the weather gets colder and circulation becomes increasingly important.

What sets Vim & Vigr apart are its fun, unique designs. Not only is there a wide range of colors to choose from but the brand also offers several interesting patterns. I’m a fan of the color block options, as well as a Rugby Stripe pattern for men.

Vim & Vigr offers wide calf versions of all their socks for both men and women, so you don’t have to be uncomfortable even when donning a tight pair of socks. If you don’t need medical-grade compression, you can always opt for the brand’s moisture-wicking nylon material, or the remarkably warm merino wool composition. You could also check out Vim & Vigr sleeves, which compress your calves without encasing your feet.

Who should wear compression socks?

Anyone can wear compression socks but they do figure to benefit some groups more than others. This predominantly includes athletes, pregnant women, and elderly people, though anyone who sits or stands for long periods of time at work should consider them as well.

Deatherage suggested that if you work out in the morning before sitting at a desk or standing all day, where your calves and ankles stay at the bottom of the gravity chain, it’s smart to wear compression socks post-workout. This helps with swelling and gets blood back to the heart.

Conversely, if you sit all day and prefer to work out at night, wearing compression socks while exercising after work may allow for less fatigue in the lower legs and can help enhance circulation.

Athletes

Concerning the exact impact of compression socks on athletes, Deatherage told Insider that their effectiveness is still somewhat undecided. There is some research that confirms that wearing compression garments helps improve running endurance or cycling sprints, while others say it doesn’t change a thing.

A recently-published analysis in the Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine looked at 21 studies and found that a small number do show that wearing compression socks during exercise improved performance. Mostly, though, the studies showed wearing the special socks during a grueling workout helped fit folks feel like their leg muscles were firing better, fatiguing less, and, after the workout, less sore.

Even if it’s just a placebo effect, those training hard, particularly for long endurance events like a marathon, wearing compression socks during workouts and after for recovery may help make training easier.

“When looking at the cost-benefit ratio and considering what research is out there, it’s not a bad idea,” Deatherage said. “And it’s an easy thing to do.”

Pregnant women

Besides runners, Deatherage says pregnant women may benefit from compression socks, as they’re more prone to swelling. Venous issues are also particularly high for pregnant women as they have a larger volume of blood pumping through their bodies. 

Some 40% of pregnant women develop varicose veins, while the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is four- to five-fold higher for moms-to-be compared to non-pregnant women. Wearing compression socks or stockings during pregnancy can potentially help reduce swelling and discomfort, improve circulation, and minimize varicose veins.

Seniors

Elderly people with deep vein thrombosis, those who just had surgery on their legs, or anyone trying to minimize varicose veins or blood clot concerns, might also benefit from compression socks. The catch is here is that these more serious vascular issues, including varicose veins, would benefit more from medical grade compression socks, Deatherage added, which requires a doctor prescription and are often more expensive.

How to shop for compression socks

If you’re simply looking for workout recovery or want relief from more minor issues of swelling or soreness, say on long flights or during long work shifts on your feet (like nurses), you may see advantages from more moderate compression socks, Deatherage said. This includes socks with ratings of about 10-20mmHg, which stands for millimeters of mercury (a measurement of pressure).

When shopping around for compression socks, Deatherage said that besides a sock’s mmHg rating, the most important thing to look for is comfort, saying that “compression socks only work if you wear them.”

Look for a pair in which the material feels comfortable against your skin, and a set that feels snug but not too tight — you don’t want to restrict your movement. If you can find a pair that offers customization for your size, that’s even better.

Compression sock ratings

As noted above, the compression in the stockings is measured in mm Hg. Specifically, compression socks are rated based on blood pressure. The majority of compression socks either have a moderate pressure rating of 10 to 20 mmHg or a firm rating of 20 to 30 mmHg.

None of the socks we reviewed have a rating above 30 mm Hg, but there are specialty shops where you can find these if needed. Graduated compression socks, the most common type, are tighter near the ankle than at the calf to avoid cutting off circulation.

Fabrics used

Most compression socks are made from a blend of synthetic fabrics that provide a snug and stretchy fit. In the reviews that follow, we let you know what materials are used in the construction of the socks but unless you have an issue with a specific material, you should let performance be your main guide in choosing the best compression socks.

How best to use compression socks

There is a bit of a paradox associated with wearing compression socks. You may have purchased them to deal with leg swelling. Yet, this same swelling makes it hard for you to put them on. So, what can you do? There are countless resources on the web to help you out, plus we’ve compiled a few tips here, as well: 

  • Apply talcum powder or cornstarch to your feet before putting your socks on.
  • Wear dishwashing gloves to get a better grip.
  • Roll the socks before you put them on so you can just roll them up your legs.
Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch soccer at the Tokyo Olympics – women’s group matches begin on July 21

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USWNT US Women's National Team Soccer
US women’s national soccer team members Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe celebrate.

  • Olympic soccer will begin before the opening ceremonies with women’s group matches starting July 21.
  • Games will air on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel via cable and live streaming services.
  • The women’s gold medal match is August 5, while the men’s gold medal will be decided on August 7.

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Soccer will be one of the first sports to begin competition at the Tokyo Olympics, with women’s group stage matches starting on July 21 and the men’s matches starting on July 22. The Tokyo Opening Ceremonies will be held on July 23 and Olympic soccer competition will continue through August 7.

A total of 24 nations will compete in soccer during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with 16 qualifying men’s teams and 12 women’s teams. You can watch select games on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel through cable and live streaming services.

While Olympic men’s soccer has been restricted to players 23-years-old and younger since 1992, the one-year delay of the 2020 games led to the age limit being increased to 24. Men’s teams can also name up to three senior players above the age limit to compete in the Olympics. Brazil won the men’s soccer gold medal as the host nation in 2016, led by international superstar Neymar.

Women’s teams don’t have roster restrictions, and the US women’s national soccer team, or USWNT, is bringing back most of its players from the 2019 World Cup championship squad. The Americans plan to return to gold medal form after losing in the quarter-finals of the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The US Men’s soccer team was eliminated from Olympic contention after a loss to Honduras in a June qualifying tournament. USWNT has won four Olympic gold medals including a 2012 victory over Japan, while the men’s team has never won a gold medal and hasn’t qualified for the Olympics since 2008.

How to watch Olympic soccer

You can watch select Olympic soccer games on NBC Sports, USA, the Olympic Channel, Telemundo, and NBC Universo. Most of the games in Tokyo will air during the early morning hours in the US. The most important Olympic soccer matches will air on USA and NBC Sports Network.

If you have an authenticated pay-TV provider with access to the required NBC stations, you can stream every Olympic soccer match via NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app.

If you don’t have a cable provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling TV is the most affordable choice to get every Olympic soccer channel. The Sling Blue plan starts at $35/month for access to NBC, NBCSN, and USA. New subscribers can get their first month for just $10. You can add the Olympic channel for an additional $11/month with the Sports Extra package.

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If you can’t watch the games live, NBC will provide daily highlights and evening recaps of each day’s events. In addition to primetime coverage on NBC, you can visit NBCOlympics.com or download Peacock, NBC’s streaming service, to watch free soccer highlights and clips from other sports.

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Women’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of women’s soccer matches for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 21

Event Time Channel
Great Britain vs. Chile (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
China vs. Brazil (Group F) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Sweden (Group G) 4:30 a.m. ET USA
Japan vs. Canada (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

Zambia vs. Netherlands (Group F) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Australia vs. New Zealand (Group G) 7:30 a.m. ET USA

July 24

Event Time Channel
Chile vs. Canada (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET TBA
China vs. Zambia (Group F) 4 a.m. ET TBA
Sweden vs. Australia (Group G) 4:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network
Japan vs. Great Britain (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET TBA
Netherlands vs. Brazil (Group F) 7 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. United States 7:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network and Telemundo

July 27

Event Time Channel
Sweden vs. New Zealand (Group G)

4 a.m. ET

TBA
United States v Australia (Group G) 4 a.m. ET USA
Chile vs. Japan (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Canada vs. Great Britain (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Brazil vs. Zambia (Group F) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Netherlands vs. China (Group F)

7:30 a.m. ET

TBA

July 30

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Women’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET TBA

August 2

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals one 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals two 7 a.m. ET USA

August 5

Event Time Channel
Women’s bronze medal match 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s gold medal match 10 p.m. ET USA

Men’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of men’s soccer matches announced for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 22

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Spain (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Mexico vs. France (Group A) 4 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo
New Zealand vs. South Korea (Group B) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Cote d’Ivoire vs. Saudi Arabia (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Argentina vs. Australia (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Japan vs. South Africa (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Honduras vs. Romania (Group B) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Brazil vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo

July 25

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Argentina (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
France vs. South Africa (Group A) 4 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. Honduras (Group B) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Brazil vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Australia vs. Spain (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Universo
Japan vs. Mexico (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Telemundo
Romania vs. South Korea (Group B) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Saudi Arabia vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET TBA

July 28

Event Time Channel
Saudi Arabia vs. Brazil (Group D) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Germany vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Romania vs. New Zealand (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
South Korea vs. Honduras (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Australia vs. Egypt (Group C) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Spain vs. Argentina (Group C) 7 a.m. ET Universo
France vs. Japan (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

South Africa vs. Mexico (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo

July 31

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET USA

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals one 4 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s semifinals two 7 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s bronze medal match 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal match 7:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch the NBA Finals without a cable subscription

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Giannis Antetokounmpo dunk
Giannis Antetokounmpo goes to the basket as Chris Paul looks on in game 2 of the NBA Finals.

  • The 2021 NBA Finals are now underway between the Phoenix Suns and Milwaukee Bucks.
  • You can watch the remaining NBA Finals on ABC and ESPN3.
  • Many internet providers offer ESPN3 for free, and Sling is the cheapest streaming service with the channel.

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The 2020-21 NBA regular season concluded on May 16 and the Finals began on July 6. Remaining games are being broadcast live on ABC and ESPN3.

The Chris Paul-led Phoenix Suns defeated LeBron James and the Los Angeles Lakers, NBA MVP Nikola Jokic and the Denver Nuggets, and the Los Angeles Clippers to represent the Western Conference in the Finals. In the Eastern Conference, the Milwaukee Bucks beat the star-studded Brooklyn Nets, the Miami Heat team that eliminated them last year, and the surprising Atlanta Hawks to earn their first Finals appearance since 1974.

You can see the full 2021 NBA playoff bracket below, including the matchups following the play-in tournament that ended on May 21.

NBA Playoff Bracket
The 2020-21 NBA playoff bracket.

Key dates for the 2020-21 NBA season

The 2020-21 NBA season is coming to a close with the Finals now in full swing. Here’s a rundown of key post-season dates.

  • May 22 – NBA playoffs officially began
  • July 8 – NBA Finals began
  • July 22 – NBA Finals Game Seven, if necessary

How to watch the 2021 NBA Finals

The NBA Finals are being broadcast live on ABC and ESPN3. ABC is available through several subscription streaming services without cable, and you may be able to stream the game online for free via ESPN3 depending on your internet provider. You can see if your internet provider includes ESPN3 here.

You can also stream the NBA Finals via the ESPN app, ABC.com, or the ABC app if you already pay for those channels through your TV provider.

If you don’t have a cable or satellite subscription, you can sign up for a live TV streaming service with access to ABC and/or ESPN3, like Sling TV, AT&T TV, Hulu + Live TV, Fubo TV, or YouTube TV, to watch the Finals live.

Sling TV

Sling TV includes ESPN3 as part of its Orange plan for $35 a month. Sling doesn’t include ABC, but NBA Finals airing on that network are simulcast on ESPN3.

New Sling subscribers can get their first month for a discounted rate of just $10, which makes Sling one of the cheapest options for people who just want to stream the NBA Finals.

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YouTube TV

YouTubeTV offers channels like ABC, ESPN, TNT, and NBA TV for $65 a month, providing full access to all of the major broadcast and cable networks that show NBA games, including the Finals.

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Hulu + Live TV

Hulu + Live TV features access to channels like ESPN, TNT, and ABC for $65 a month, offering full access to the NBA Finals. However, NBA TV is not offered which could be an issue for viewers who want to catch more games during the regular season.

On the plus side, Hulu + Live TV does include access to Hulu’s entire on-demand library of shows and movies. You can also bundle Hulu with ESPN+ and Disney Plus for an extra $8 a month.

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Fubo TV

Fubo TV includes ABC under its Starter plan for $65 a month, so you can catch the NBA Finals. On the downside, TNT is not currently available, which could be an issue for fans who want to watch games during the regular season and playoffs.

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AT&T TV

AT&T TV is one of the most comprehensive options for streaming the NBA all season long. Plans start at $70 a month, but NBA fans who want access to the most games will need the Choice plan for $85 a month. This package includes ABC, ESPN, TNT, and NBA TV.

That said, viewers who just need ABC or ESPN3 to watch the Finals have cheaper options to consider.

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2021 NBA Finals schedule

The 2021 NBA Finals began on July 8. You can find dates and times for the remaining games below.

Wednesday, July 14

Game Four: Phoenix Suns at Milwaukee Bucks, 9 p.m. ET on ABC and ESPN3

Saturday, July 17

Game Five: Milwaukee Bucks at Phoenix Suns, 9 p.m. ET on ABC and ESPN3

Tuesday, July 20

Game Six (if necessary): Phoenix Suns at Milwaukee Bucks, 9 p.m. ET on ABC and ESPN3

Thursday, July 22

Game Seven (if necessary): Milwaukee Bucks at Phoenix Suns, 9 p.m. ET on ABC and ESPN3

Read the original article on Business Insider

Dr. Jason Wersland on the growth and ongoing innovation of his tech wellness company, Therabody

Dr. Jason Wersland Therabody founder
Therabody founder Dr. Jason Wersland.

  • Therabody is the tech wellness brand that encompasses the line of industry-leading percussive massage guns known as Theragun, as well as products like the RecoveryAir and Wave Roller.
  • Insider explored the company’s mission and growth in a conversation with founder and chiropractor Dr. Jason Wersland, who built the first makeshift Theragun in 2008 with his own two hands after identifying a gap in the market.
  • As an investor and strategic advisor with Therabody, tennis champion Maria Sharapova actively works with Dr. Jason to support global expansion, marketing, and creative efforts.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Theragun is no stranger to the internet. Its popular ergonomic triangular design has filled social media feeds in recent years, showcased by celebrities, professional athletes, famous fitness trainers, and the everyday exercise fanatic.

This beloved percussive massage gun is the brainchild of Los Angeles-based chiropractor Dr. Jason Wersland (known as Dr. Jason), who first created the tool in his garage after suffering firsthand from debilitating pain triggered by a motorcycle accident.

Since its first official prototype hit the market in 2016, Theragun has launched three additional generations and has attracted a flood of brand deals and high-profile partnerships, namely, one with five-time Grand Slam tennis champion Maria Sharapova. Over 250 professional sports teams from the major leagues also turn to Theragun for performance and recovery assistance, the New York Mets being the most recent as of April.

The most current Theragun generation provides Bluetooth-connectivity and the unique recovery experience of merging with a companion app, as devised by Dr. Jason to help guide the use of the device through personalized routines. The science behind the Theragun technology is the distinct calibration of amplitude, frequency, and torque, which accelerates the repair of muscle tissue and relieves pain and tension when used together in a percussive motion.

Theragun
The Theragun product family.

Recently, Theragun has become a single line of products among the many offered by Therabody, the recently minted tech wellness brand. For Dr. Jason, the transition to Therabody was encompassed by this notion: “You only get one body. You can’t cash it in or get a new one at 50, so what are you going to do with it?”

He arrived at this concept in 2018 after a decade of collecting data on the effectiveness of the Theragun, which he proved with the overwhelmingly positive results he found in his patients, many of whom were athletes. The next step in his journey was to connect the use of the Theragun to a greater wellness philosophy for everyone, which was the idea that “you can help yourself and not wait for someone else,” as Dr. Jason said in an interview with Insider.

That’s the mission that drives Therabody’s ongoing innovation. Following the rebranding, the company acquired PowerDot and RP Sports, introducing additional forms of muscle treatment to Therabody’s natural wellness portfolio, which includes smart vibrating rollers in their Wave Series and a US grown organic CBD line under TheraOne. As part of their holistic approach to wellness, Therabody also offers an educational component for everyday people and health professionals alike, called Therabody University.

“When you engage with Therabody, you’re engaging with an ethos,” Dr. Jason said. “It’s an ecosystem, not just a product.”

Dr Jason described this “ecosystem” as one intended to empower both high-performing professional athletes and regular people who simply want to move their body without experiencing pain. With the right tools at their disposal, it’s Dr. Jason’s hope that people can rely less on medication and more on taking care of their body preventatively. However, Dr. Jason stressed that one of the most important tools of all is the knowledge of what recovery means and how integral it is to the act of exercising.

“When we work out, when we sweat, we’re spring cleaning ourselves. So, we’re just taking garbage out,” he said. “But if you don’t do the recovery part, it’s like you took the garbage to your front door and just left it there-it’s going to start to smell and stink.”

Sharapova has long valued the importance of preparation and recovery in her fitness routine as a top-performing tennis pro

Maria Sharapova and Therabody founder Dr. Jason Wersland
Maria Sharapova and Dr. Jason Wersland.

The Theragun and its sister products help aid this process of post-work out recovery, in addition to serving as a natural solution for chronic pain. For Sharapova, recovery was especially essential to her training as a professional tennis player, and the Theragun’s existence as a tool to complement this immediately caught her eye.

After her retirement from the court in 2020, Sharapova shifted her focus to her business career, specifically with regard to further developing her investment portfolio, which already included Supergoop, the luxury sun care brand, and Sugarpova, her own self-funded candy company.

Her decision to invest in Therabody and become a strategic advisor on the company’s board had to do with her belief in the company’s collaborative culture, as well as its industry-disruptive technology and ability to improve people’s lives.

“As I continue to grow my business portfolio, I think it’s important to work with partners that have great potential from a business perspective, and that can also have a positive impact on peoples’ lives-and Therabody is the perfect example of that,” Sharapova wrote in an email to Insider.

Dr. Jason said that both he and Sharapova are driven by an entrepreneurial spirit, a passion to do good for humanity, and high expectations of themselves, which are core principles that unite them in their partnership. The two also happen to be neighbors in Los Angeles, making for easy collaboration and brainstorming in the convenience of their backyards.

On his partnership with Sharapova and their alignment in business visions, Dr. Jason said, “She doesn’t like to lose, nor do we. I mean, simply, we’re competitive. But at the same time, we’re not. What we’re doing really helps people.”

Perhaps the most distinctive aspect of their relationship is the fact that Sharapova is not only a business partner, but a patient-a dynamic that is often common in Dr. Jason’s business relations, establishing a uniquely personal connection and level of trust. From the point of view of a chiropractor, Dr. Jason has a genuine concern for the health of the people he works with, a value that inspires him to continue to grow Therabody’s offerings and expand its influence.

“I’m an advocate for their health, and also we do this business on the side,” Dr. Jason added. “So it’s a little bit of a different relationship-I really truly want the best for Maria and want her to continue to be able to move and do what she does.”

This desire to enable people of all fitness levels to lead healthy, pain-free lives through the freedom of movement is what keeps Dr. Jason motivated in the booming health and wellness space. Through technology, science, and research, Dr. Jason feels confident that Therabody is on the right path to achieve its goal of expansion and further amplify its message and voice.

“I think, in my opinion, we’re probably 5% of what we could potentially be,” Dr. Jason said. “Because there’s that many people on the Earth who haven’t had this yet, so we’ve got a lot of work to do.”

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Italy won the Euro 2020 final against England with a penalty shootout. Here’s why penalty kicks are so unfair to goalies.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Narrator: 0.4 seconds. That’s the time it takes you to blink. It’s also about how long goalkeepers have to save a penalty kick or fail trying. And it’s certainly not enough time for a goalie to react and respond. So goalies can’t solely rely on their speed and agility to save a penalty kick. Instead, they have to pretty much guess which direction to go and rely on either luck or game theory.

Game theory is a popular strategy in economics where the outcome of a situation relies more on how well you predict your opponent’s actions than how you perform your own. So since the goalie has no choice but to guess, they’re better off guessing logically than randomly. That’s where economists come in.

Ignacio Palacios-Huerta: I would like to know what you do in the last 80 penalty kicks you faced? Do you have any tendencies? What does this guy do against right-footed kickers versus left-footed kickers?

Narrator: That’s economist Ignacio Palacios-Huerta. He studied over 11,000 penalty kicks, and in 2008 during the UEFA Champions League Final, it paid off, sort of. It was Manchester United against Chelsea. The game came down to a penalty shootout which was the perfect opportunity for Chelsea to put Huerta’s advice into action.

Along with several pointers Huerta had given Chelsea’s goalie a key insight about Manchester United star Cristiano Ronaldo. Ronaldo would almost certainly kick the ball to the right if he paused on the run-up. And the advice worked. Ronaldo indeed paused and indeed kicked the ball to the right. Chelsea’s goalie followed Huerta’s advice and made the save. Ultimately Manchester United won the game, but despite Chelsea’s loss, it was clear that economists and statisticians can help even the odds when it comes to penalty kicks.

Because otherwise, it’s a crap shoot for the goalie. In 2014 for example, FiveThirtyEight calculated that 72.5% of penalties in World Cup history went in. For all competitions worldwide, it’s even higher. And when you take a closer look, it’s no wonder. Human response time takes roughly 1/10 of a second to kick in. The average kicker kicks a 70 mile per hour ball, which means the goalie won’t even register the ball’s direction until it’s about 25 feet away. It will take him another .5 to .7 seconds to react and reach for the ball, but by that point, it’s all over.

Now the goalie can improve the odds if they start to move before the ball is even kicked, but the goalie still has to basically guess a side and just go for it. So if time is the goalie’s enemy, maybe we should just move the penalty kicker further back. But for now, economists are a goalie’s best friend when it comes to stopping penalty kicks, and turns out, Huerta is helping a team in the 2018 World Cup, though he wouldn’t tell us who.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This video was originally published in July 2018.

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Facebook employees are reportedly begging the company to do more about racist comments attacking English soccer players after the team lost the Euro Cup final

english soccer player bukayo saka is seen on a field
Bukayo Saka on July 11, 2021.

  • Employees are frustrated with Facebook as racist comments fill Black soccer players’ accounts.
  • Employees said the company needs to act faster and “can’t be seen as complicit in this.”
  • One employee said they’ve reported so many comments that they are now disabled from doing so.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Facebook employees are begging the company to take more aggressive action against racist comments on the accounts of English soccer players Bukayo Saka and Marcus Rashford, according to journalist Ryan Mac.

Mac said on Twitter that Facebook employees told him they have been alerting the company of racist comments for more than 12 hours now. Many of the comments include monkey emojis, according to Mac, and an employee inquired if it’s “possible to remove known racist emojis from comments.”

The company told Insider that a banana or monkey emoji on its own doesn’t necessarily violate the rules, but the context is considered when Facebook reviews content.

The comments also appear to be coming from anonymous and spam accounts that intend to abuse people online, an employee said.

Another employee said they had reported so many racist comments that their personal Instagram account has been disabled from reporting anymore.

“We MUST act faster here,” one employee said, according to Mac.

A Facebook spokesperson told Insider that “we quickly removed comments and accounts directing abuse at England’s footballers last night and we’ll continue to take action against those that break our rules.”

The spokesperson also said, “no one thing will fix this challenge overnight, but we’re committed to keeping our community safe from abuse.”

Other employees said they are confused as to why Facebook didn’t anticipate such racist remarks leading up to the sporting event since they have been a common occurrence throughout the season, according to Mac.

“We get this stream of utter bile every match, and it’s even worse when someone black misses… We really can’t be seen as complicit in this,” one employee said in an internal forum, Mac said.

Insider viewed the comments sections under both Saka and Rashford’s Instagram posts and viewed various racist comments, such as one user who referred to Saka and another as “baboooooons.”

Many users called for the racist hate to stop and expressed support for both players, as well as advised others to report racist comments that they see.

Facebook uses both human moderators and AI to sift through posts. Content moderation has long been Facebook’s Achilles Heel, and public pressure for the company to more heavily police what users post has picked up steam in the last year specifically.

Facebook’s content moderation policies have typically taken center stage in political discourse, especially in regard to former President Donald Trump’s posts, the 2020 presidential election, and the right’s belief that Big Tech censors conservative users.

Read the original article on Business Insider