304 are dead and 1,800 injured after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake – more powerful than the catastrophic quake of 2010 – hit Haiti

Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake
Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake

  • A 7.2 magnitude earthquake has struck off the coast of Haiti.
  • Haitian authorities said at least 304 people have been killed in the quake, with 1,800 injured.
  • Haiti is still recovering from a 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated the country in 2010.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Haitian authorities announced Saturday evening that at least 304 people have been killed and 1,800 injured after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck the country, according to The Associated Press.

The quake struck the country at roughly 8:30 a.m. local time, some 7.5 miles northeast of Saint-Louis-du-Sud, and more than 90 miles west of the capital, Port-au-Prince, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) said.

Then, 20 minutes after the first quake, a 5.2-magnitude tremor struck the island.

Videos from social media show destroyed buildings and distressed voices shouting as the population reels from the disaster.

“High casualties are probable and the disaster is likely widespread,” according to the USGS.

Flooding appears to have started in the country, raising the risk for more damage to follow the quake, which was felt as far as Cuba and Jamaica.

“I extend my sympathies to the parents of the victims of this violent earthquake which caused several losses of human and material lives in several geographical departments of the country,” said Ariel Henry, Haiti’s new prime minister.

He later added: “The most important thing is to recover as many survivors as possible under the rubble. We have learned that the local hospitals, in particular that of Les Cayes, are overwhelmed with wounded, fractured people.”

“I can confirm that there are deaths, but I don’t yet have an exact toll,” Jerry Chandler, Haiti’s director of civil protection, told AFP. “We’re still collecting information.”

The US Tsunami Warning System has forecasted “hazardous tsunami waves,” with predictions of waves reaching up to three meters above the tide level along the coast of Haiti.

A 7.0-magnitude earthquake rocked the country in 2010, killing between 220,000 and 300,000 people.

The impoverished Caribbean nation, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic, is still recovering from the 2010 disaster. There were 52 aftershocks that followed the 2010 quake, which raises the question of how much damage is still yet to come from today’s tremor.

In 2017, the United Nations (UN) stated that 2.5 million Haitians still needed aid following the quake that devastated the country seven years earlier.

At the time, UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mourad Wahba gave a harrowing account of the challenges that the country continued to face.

“There are still about 55,000 people in camps and makeshift camps,” he said. “Many are still living in unsanitary conditions due to displacement caused by the earthquake. We have a very long way to go.”

The quake also comes amid unrest following the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in his home last month.

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were briefed on the quake by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan and the Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Saturday morning, according to a White House official.

The president has authorized an immediate response and tapped Samantha Power, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) administrator, to coordinate the efforts in aiding Haiti.

This breaking news story has been updated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

227 are reported dead after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake – more powerful than the catastrophic quake of 2010 – hit Haiti

Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake
Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake

  • A 7.2 magnitude earthquake has struck off the coast of Haiti.
  • The country’s civil protection agency says that at least 227 people have been killed in the quake.
  • Haiti is still recovering from a 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated the country in 2010.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Haiti’s civil protection agency announced Saturday afternoon that at least 227 people have been killed after a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck the country, according to The Associated Press.

The quake struck the country at roughly 8:30 a.m. local time, some 7.5 miles northeast of Saint-Louis-du-Sud, and more than 90 miles west of the capital, Port-au-Prince, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) said.

Then, 20 minutes after the first quake, a 5.2-magnitude tremor struck the island.

Videos from social media show destroyed buildings and distressed voices shouting as the population reels from the disaster.

“High casualties are probable and the disaster is likely widespread,” according to the USGS.

Flooding appears to have started in the country, raising the risk for more damage to follow the quake, which was felt as far as Cuba and Jamaica.

“I extend my sympathies to the parents of the victims of this violent earthquake which caused several losses of human and material lives in several geographical departments of the country,” said Ariel Henry, Haiti’s new prime minister.

He later added: “The most important thing is to recover as many survivors as possible under the rubble. We have learned that the local hospitals, in particular that of Les Cayes, are overwhelmed with wounded, fractured people.”

“I can confirm that there are deaths, but I don’t yet have an exact toll,” Jerry Chandler, Haiti’s director of civil protection, told AFP. “We’re still collecting information.”

The US Tsunami Warning System has forecasted “hazardous tsunami waves,” with predictions of waves reaching up to three meters above the tide level along the coast of Haiti.

A 7.0-magnitude earthquake rocked the country in 2010, killing between 220,000 and 300,000 people.

The impoverished Caribbean nation, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic, is still recovering from the 2010 disaster. There were 52 aftershocks that followed the 2010 quake, which raises the question of how much damage is still yet to come from today’s tremor.

In 2017, the United Nations (UN) stated that 2.5 million Haitians still needed aid following the quake that devastated the country seven years earlier.

At the time, UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mourad Wahba gave a harrowing account of the challenges that the country continued to face.

“There are still about 55,000 people in camps and makeshift camps,” he said. “Many are still living in unsanitary conditions due to displacement caused by the earthquake. We have a very long way to go.”

The quake also comes amid unrest following the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in his home last month.

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were briefed on the quake by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan and the Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Saturday morning, according to a White House official.

The president has authorized an immediate response and tapped Samantha Power, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) administrator, to coordinate the efforts in aiding Haiti.

This breaking news story has been updated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

7.2-magnitude earthquake hits Haiti, larger than devastating 2010 quake

Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake
Scenes of devastation from the Haiti earthquake

  • A 7.2 magnitude earthquake has struck off the coast of Haiti.
  • The country’s civil protection agency says that at least 29 people have been killed in the quake.
  • Haiti is still recovering from a 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated the country in 2010.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A 7.2-magnitude earthquake has hit roughly 7.5 miles northeast of Saint-Louis-du-Sud, on the South West Coast of Haiti, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) said.

The quake struck the country at roughly 8:30 a.m. local time, about 150 km west of the capital, Port-au-Prince. It was

Then, 20 minutes after the first quake, a 5.2-magnitude tremor struck the island.

Videos from social media show destroyed buildings and distressed voices shouting as the population reels from the disaster.

On Saturday afternoon, Haiti’s civil protection agency announced that at least 29 people had been killed in the earthquake, according to The Associated Press.

“High casualties are probable and the disaster is likely widespread,” according to the USGS.

Flooding appears to have started in the country, raising the risk for more damage to follow the quake, which was felt as far as Cuba and Jamaica.

Haitian authorities have confirmed that there have been fatalities and damages on the island, but neither has been quantified yet.

“I extend my sympathies to the parents of the victims of this violent earthquake which caused several losses of human and material lives in several geographical departments of the country,” said Ariel Henry, Haiti’s new prime minister.

“I can confirm that there are deaths, but I don’t yet have an exact toll,” Jerry Chandler, Haiti’s director of civil protection, told AFP. “We’re still collecting information.”

The US Tsunami Warning System has forecasted “hazardous tsunami waves,” with predictions of waves reaching up to three meters above the tide level along the coast of Haiti.

A 7.0-magnitude earthquake rocked the country in 2010, killing between 220,000 and 300,000 people.

The impoverished Caribbean nation, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic, is still recovering from the 2010 disaster. There were 52 aftershocks that followed the 2010 quake, which raises the question of how much damage is still yet to come from today’s tremor.

In 2017, the United Nations (UN) stated that 2.5 million Haitians still needed aid following the quake that devastated the country seven years earlier.

At the time, UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mourad Wahba gave a harrowing account of the challenges that the country continued to face.

“There are still about 55,000 people in camps and makeshift camps,” he said. “Many are still living in unsanitary conditions due to displacement caused by the earthquake. We have a very long way to go.”

The quake also comes amid unrest following the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in his home last month.

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were briefed on the quake by National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan and the Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Saturday morning, according to a White House official.

The president has authorized an immediate response and tapped Samantha Power, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) administrator, to coordinate the efforts in aiding Haiti.

This breaking news story has been updated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

July was Earth’s hottest month in recorded history

Extreme heat warning sign California
The Western US has seen extreme temperatures so far this year

July was the hottest month recorded in modern history, according to a report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued on Friday.

The agency has tracked temperature records for 142 years.

“In this case, first place is the worst place to be,” NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said in the report. “This new record adds to the disturbing and disruptive path that climate change has set for the globe.”

This story is developing. Check back for updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The US embassy in Kabul is shredding documents and disposing of American flags over fears the building could soon be overrun by the Taliban

View of the U.S. Embassy (front buildings) in Kabul, Afghanistan, January 20, 2016. Picture taken January 20, 2016.    AfghanistanLM       REUTERS/Omar Sobhani
View of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul

  • US embassy staff in Kabul were told to start destroying documents as the Taliban advances, according to Bloomberg.
  • The notice to staff in Afghanistan’s capital city also asked that anything with a US logo or flag be destroyed.
  • The memo showed the seriousness of the Taliban threat as US officials claimed the retreat was not an “evacuation.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Staff at the US embassy in Kabul were told on Friday to destroy sensitive material, highlighting fears that the Taliban may soon overrun the building in Afghanistan’s capital city, according to Bloomberg.

The notice to American personnel sent from the embassy facilities manager asked that staff destroy anything with US logos, flags, or other items “which could be misused in propaganda efforts,” the report said.

The memo reportedly told diplomats how they destroy materials: using burn bins and shredders for paper, incinerators for medical waste, a compactor to crush large items, and a disintegrator for electronics.

The Pentagon said Thursday that 3,000 additional US troops will be sent to the Kabul airport to assist with the American evacuation, as the Taliban make rapid gains across Afghanistan. Taliban forces have been overrunning Afghan government posts, sending thousands of civilians fleeing to Kabul.

The embassy’s memo does not apply to weapons or ammunition, according to Bloomberg, which also cited two Biden administration officials who said the destruction procedure is standard when a US outpost overseas is being “scaled down.”

During a briefing Thursday, State Department spokesman Ned Price claimed the US’s moves are not an evacuation.

“This is not abandonment. This is not an evacuation. This is not the wholesale withdrawal,” he said. “What this is is a reduction in the size of our civilian footprint. This is a drawdown of civilian Americans who will in many cases be able to perform their important functions elsewhere, whether that’s in the United States or elsewhere in the region.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Washington, DC, military base was on lockdown over a ‘potential armed individual’ at the installation

Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling
Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling

  • Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in DC was on lockdown after reports of an armed individual on the base.
  • The two-and-a-half-hour lockdown was lifted after an all-clear from the base on Friday afternoon.
  • The Metropolitan Police Department said it detained the suspect.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, DC, was on lockdown for about two-and-a-half hours on Friday afternoon.

The base was locked down over a “potential armed individual,” First Lt. Cali Gradishar, the base’s chief of public affairs, told Insider.

The police were called over reports of a shooting at 3800 Halley Terrace SE at 12:04 p.m., where they found evidence of a shooting, but no victim, Officer Makhetha Watson of the Metropolitan Police Department told Insider. After the call, the suspect ran from his location to the base, Watson said.

On its Facebook page, the military base warned anyone who encountered the suspect to run, hide, or fight, a common piece of advice in shootings.

As of 3:02 p.m., the base issued an all-clear and reported that “the individual was detained and will be transferred to Metropolitan Police Department custody.” First responders are still assessing the situation, the base said.

There were no initial reports of injuries, a military spokesperson told Military.com reporter Steve Benyon.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A federal judge refused to block the CDC’s moratorium on evictions – but said she believes the ban is illegal

Eviction protestors
New Yorkers protest evictions.

  • A federal judge refused to block the CDC’s eviction ban on Friday.
  • But she wrote she believes the ban is illegal and her “hands are tied” with the Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of the ban.
  • After the nationwide ban lapsed, Biden announced a new 60-day one after pressure from progressives.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A federal judge refused to block the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s moratorium on evictions on Friday.

But US District Judge Dabney Friedrich made it clear she believes the ban is illegal, writing in her opinion that the court’s “hands are tied” by a higher court’s ruling keeping the ban in place.

Friedrich wrote she believes the new ban on evictions implemented by the CDC is similar to a version of the rule she had deemed illegal in May, and she added in her opinion that even though President Joe Biden’s administration “repeatedly” said it wouldn’t further extend the moratorium given a June extension, but this effectively does so anyway.

Still, she agreed to keep the ban in place in May to prevent a wave of COVID-19 cases.

The eviction ban was initially announced on September 4, to take effect for the rest of 2020. On his first day in office, Biden extended the order through June 30 to aid tenants struggling through the pandemic’s financial fallout. In May, Friedrich wrote that the CDC did not have the authority to impose a nationwide eviction ban, saying the ban was among “difficult policy decisions that have had enormous real-world consequences” in the pandemic, but ultimately the CDC could not overrule property rights.

In June, The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 to keep the moratorium in place and it was extended an additional month, through July. Its expiration at the end of that month prompted outrage from Democrats who argued that renters still needed pandemic relief.

Rep. Cori Bush, who led efforts to get the ban extended for a third time, slept at the Capitol as her Democratic colleagues went on recess in a process against renters being evicted. The pressure that progressives put on Biden ended up being successful – on August 3, Biden announced a 60-day eviction ban through October 3 that is not nationwide, but will protect an estimated 90% of renters.

While the extension was a win for renters, landlords turned to legal action. The Alabama Association of Realtors filed a lawsuit on last week challenging the moratorium’s legality, arguing the CDC exceeded its authority. The groups argued the CDC caved into “a tidal wave of political pressure” from Democrats pressing the White House to act unilaterally, given that Biden had previously said there was no legal path forward for a further extension.

The new eviction moratorium is designed to protect renters in areas where community transmission rates are reaching “high or substantial” levels, and the Biden administration now appears to be focusing on distributing $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance as fast as possible.

“By the time it gets litigated, it will probably give additional time while we’re getting that $45 billion out to people behind on rent,” Biden said last week, in reference to the moratorium’s legal challenges.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Washington DC military base is on lockdown over reports of a ‘potential armed individual’ at the installation

Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling
Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling

Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, DC is on lockdown after reports of an armed individual spotted on the south side of the base, according to the military base.

According to a post on the base’s Facebook page, the base was locked down over a “potential armed individual.”

The base said the person potentially on the base was a Black man with dreads wearing “blue or green pants and a white tank top (possibly with a bag).”

WTOP reporter Megan Cloherty reported that sources heard gunshots near the base.

As of now, there are no reports of injuries, a military spokesperson told Military.com reporter Steve Benyon.

The base warned those at the installation: “If you encounter the individual and have a safe route, RUN. If you do not have a safe route to run, HIDE. Barricade your door, turn off the lights and your cell phone ringer, and remain silent. If you are hiding, prepare to FIGHT.”

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider

9 House Democrats threaten to tank $3.5 trillion spending plan, potentially derailing Biden’s plan to overhaul the economy

Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

  • Nine Democrats could stall the passage of a $3.5 trillion social-spending package that includes tax hikes on the rich.
  • Moderates want the infrastructure bill made law first, while progressives threaten to oppose it until they can vote on social legislation.
  • Democrats only have a three-seat House majority, so the rift stalls consideration of both bills.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nine moderate House Democrats are threatening to block the passage of a $3.5 trillion social-spending package that includes tax hikes on the rich until the infrastructure bill gets through the House and is signed into law, The New York Times reported.

They plan on sending a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday, warning they will oppose a budget resolution unless she brings a bipartisan infrastructure bill for an immediate vote. The Senate passed that piece of legislation on Tuesday with substantial GOP support.

Senate Democrats then advanced a follow-up $3.5 trillion spending blueprint early on Wednesday, which could pave the way for a major expansion of Medicare, tuition-free community college and affordable childcare that’s paid for with tax hikes on the wealthiest Americans.

Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New York, head of the House Problem Solvers Caucus, was the main author of the letter. Other signatories included Reps. Jared Golden of Maine and Kurt Schrader of Oregon.

“It’s time to get shovels in the ground and people to work,” the letter read. “We will not consider voting for a budget resolution until the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passes the House and is signed into law.”

The development represents a potent reminder of the razor-thin majority Pelosi oversees, the narrowest since World War I. House Democrats can only afford three defections – and if these moderates stick to their threat, it’s enough to block the plan.

Pelosi wants to advance the spending blueprint during the week of Aug. 23, setting the stage for a dozen Congressional committees to draft their parts of the bill with a Sept. 15 deadline. But other Democratic moderates also say they’re uneasy with approving the social legislation before the infrastructure bill, exposing a rift that may stall consideration of both bills.

A senior Democratic aide granted anonymity to speak candidly told Insider that “there are not sufficient votes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill this month.”

They noted the letter represented only nine lawmakers, in contrast to the “dozens upon dozens” of progressives also warning they will oppose the bipartisan package until Senate Democrats clear the separate party-line bill later this fall.

Democrats plan to press the $3.5 trillion spending plan through reconciliation. That allows passage of bills with only a simple majority instead of the 60 votes typically needed in the Senate, sidestepping what’s likely to be unanimous GOP opposition.

Pelosi has repeatedly said she wouldn’t bring the infrastructure bill to a House vote until the Senate passed the social policy package, part of a bid to appease progressive Democrats anxious about garnering support for the social-spending package from moderates.

She dug in on her strategy in a caucus call with House Democrats on Thursday, per a person familiar. “I am not freelancing. This is the consensus,” Pelosi told Democrats. “The votes in the House and Senate depend on us having both bills.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

9 House Democrats are threatening to hold up the $3.5 trillion social-spending package until the infrastructure bill is passed

Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

  • Nine Democrats could stall the passage of the $3.5 trillion social-spending package, the NYT reported.
  • They reportedly want the infrastructure bill to go through the House and into law first.
  • Democrats only have a three-seat House majority, so their opposition stalls its consideration.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nine moderate Democrats are threatening to block the passage of a $3.5 trillion social-spending package until the infrastructure bill gets through the House and is signed into law, The New York Times reported.

They plan on sending a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday, saying they won’t vote for a budget resolution that will let the package progress until the bipartisan infrastructure bill, which has already been approved by the Senate, passes through the House, The Times reported.

Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New York is the lead author of the letter.

The opposition of nine people is enough to block consideration of the package, The Times reported, as Democrats have a three-seat majority in the House of Representatives, and the package is a partisan one.

Pelosi had said she wouldn’t bring the infrastructure bill to a House vote until the Senate passed the social policy package, the Times noted, in a bid to appease progressive Democrats most concerned about the social-spending package.

But now the nine moderate Democrats concerned about the infrastructure have rebelled.

The letter says, according to The Times:

“With the livelihoods of hardworking American families at stake, we simply can’t afford months of unnecessary delays and risk squandering this one-in-a-century, bipartisan infrastructure package.”

“It’s time to get shovels in the ground and people to work.”

Read the original article on Business Insider