The man behind ‘Can you pet the dog?’ would love to write a book, but he’d settle for just being able to pay rent

"Fallout 4"
In “Fallout 4,” you can pet the dog.

  • With over half a million Twitter followers, “Can you pet the dog?” is wildly popular.
  • The account provides a specific service: Telling followers whether or not you can pet a dog in a given video game.
  • It’s thanks to one man, working for free, that the account has become such a smash hit.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Every week, with few exceptions, Tristan Cooper spends anywhere from a few hours to over a dozen hours telling over 500,000 people whether or not they can pet the dog in various video games like, say, “Lost Judgement” (you can).

If a video game has a dog or a cat or even a fox, chances are that Tristan’s “Can you pet the dog?” account has looked into whether or not it can be pet.

Despite runaway success, Cooper isn’t making a sustainable income from “Can you pet the dog?” even though the account is being used as a marketing bullet point for some major games with major marketing budgets.

“As of now I have not made any money on the account,” Cooper told Insider in a phone interview earlier this month. “I spend a lot of time on it and you could maybe argue that it’s helping other people get a spotlight on their games and I’m glad to do that,” he said. “But there hasn’t been a real return for me on that.”

Because of the rise of Cooper’s account over two-plus years, the answer tends to be yes, you can pet the dog.

Though he denies it, “Can you pet the dog?” has had a major impact on the video game business. Mainstream video game franchises like “Marvel’s Avengers” and “Call of Duty” have added animal petting, to say nothing of the dozens of smaller indie games that have done the same.

If there’s a cute animal in a game, chances are that players want to pet it – as highlighted by Cooper’s account:

“I would like to avoid overstating any kind of like impact that the account had,” he said. “I started it because people could pet dogs in games to begin with.”

That’s true, and he specifically cited Ubisoft’s “Far Cry: New Dawn” as part of the inspiration behind the account – a game you not only can pet the dog in, but are specifically directed to on a side mission. Other major games, including “Fallout 4” and “The Last of Us,” have featured dogs alongside the main character that were pettable.

But for every example of major games with dogs that could be pet, there are dozens of digital doggos that were unpettable.

As the account’s popularity has increased, the concept has been used as a marketing bulletpoint for everything from small indie titles to major mainstream games.

Cooper isn’t upset about this, but he would like to be able to pay his rent – and maybe turn the account into a coffee table book featuring the stories behind the digital animals we love to pet.

“A nice coffee table book of dogs in video games that you can pet…some interviews. There’s a lot of great stories, behind a lot of the dogs in games,” Cooper said. “They’re based on real dogs. They’re based on dogs that have passed away, and are immortalized in games.”

Most of all, he just wants people to keep enjoying his account even though it’s occasionally used as part of a marketing plan. “I know it is a marketing bulletpoint these days,” he said, “but that’s not to say people aren’t enjoying this.”

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Facebook leaders are reportedly worried their service has gotten too big to control: ‘We created the machine and can’t control the machine’

Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Facebook’s impact on a planet where nearly half the people alive use its product has reportedly become a point of contention among the company’s leadership.

A meeting of Facebook leaders in early September focused on “whether Facebook has gotten too big,” and that the general tone was, “We created the machine and we can’t control the machine, according to the Wall Street Journal.

A Facebook representative told Insider that the company disagrees with the report, but declined to provide an additional statement.

Facebook has faced criticism, and occasional Congressional hearings, for years due to the various effects of its massive size: The Cambridge Analytica scandal, which allowed data from hundreds of millions of users to be scraped from Facebook’s servers; the months leading up to the 2016 US presidential campaign, where foreign actors used Facebook to sow discord and division among American voters; and most recently, insurrectionists’ use of Facebook to plan and communicate during the storming of the US Capitol on January 6.

Some lawmakers have called for the regulation of Facebook, which could force the company to spin off services like Instagram, WhatsApp, and the Oculus VR hardware division.

Even if it did, that wouldn’t solve the issue of Facebook’s massive size – Facebook alone remains the world’s largest social network, with nearly 3 billion users.

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Facebook’s AI moderation reportedly can’t interpret many languages, leaving users in some countries more susceptible to harmful posts

facebook ceo mark zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in 2018.

  • Facebook’s automated content moderators can’t speak many languages used on the site.
  • Human moderators also can’t speak languages used in some foreign markets Facebook has moved into.
  • The blind spots sometimes let bad actors post harmful, violent content and conduct illegal business.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Facebook’s artificial intelligence-powered content moderators can’t read some languages used on the platform, raising concerns about how the company is policing content in countries that speak languages other than English, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

The paper viewed company documents that show Facebook doesn’t have enough employees capable of speaking local languages to monitor happenings in other countries, markets that the company has expanded into to bolster its non-US userbase. More than 90% of Facebook’s monthly users are outside North America, per the paper.

The report shows how the lack of human moderators with multi-lingual skills – combined with the shortcomings of relying on robots to weed out toxic posts – is weakening Facebook’s ability to monitor harmful content online, a topic that has brought it under heavy scrutiny for the company in recent years.

Facebook employees have expressed concerns about how the system has allowed bad actors to use the site for nefarious purposes, according to the documents viewed by The Journal.

A former vice president at the company told the paper that Facebook perceives potential harm in foreign countries as “simply the cost of doing business” in those markets. He also said there is “very rarely a significant, concerted effort to invest in fixing those areas.”

Drug cartels and human traffickers have used Facebook to recruit victims. One cartel, in particular, poses the biggest criminal drug threat to the US, per US officials, and used multiple Facebook pages to post photos of violent, graphic scenes and gun imagery. An internal investigation team wanted the cartel banned completely, but the team tasked with doing so never followed up, per the report.

In Ethiopia, groups have used Facebook to incite violence against the Tigrayan people who are victims of ethnic cleansing. That content slipped through the cracks due to a lack of moderators who speak the native language. The company also hadn’t translated its “community standards” rules to languages used in Ethiopia, per the Journal.

And most Moroccan Arabic-speaking Facebook moderators aren’t able to speak other Arabic dialects, which allowed violent content to remain up.

In most cases, Facebook took down harmful posts only when they garnered public attention and hasn’t fixed the automated systems – dubbed “classifiers” – that allowed that content to be published in the first place, per the report.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Spokesman Andy Stone told the Journal that “in countries at risk for conflict and violence, we have a comprehensive strategy, including relying on global teams with native speakers covering over 50 languages, educational resources, and partnerships with local experts and third-party fact checkers to keep people safe.”

The issue is reminiscent of what Facebook acknowledged as a lack of action against groups targeting the minority Rohingya group, victims of ethnic cleansing, in Myanmar in 2018.

Another example was when Facebook employees said the company’s removal of posts that included the hashtag al-Aqsa, a mosque in Jerusalem that is the 3rd holiest Islamic site, in May was “entirely unacceptable.” The company had cracked down on the name because of a Palestinian militant coalition, the Al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades, which has been labeled a terrorist organization by the US and EU.

One employee said the company used both human and automated moderating systems and should have consulted with experts knowledgeable about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Buzzfeed reported.

Read the full report on The Wall Street Journal here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Facebook employees worried an algorithm change in the middle of Trump’s presidency would push sensationalistic and divisive content, a new report says

mark zuckerberg
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

  • Facebook employees knew that an algorithm change in 2018 would elevate false and divisive content.
  • The company graded posts to decide what to prioritize in users’ News Feeds
  • Employees said it was “an increasing liability,” and Zuckerberg wasn’t always open to broadly fixing it.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Facebook employees were well aware that a change to the platform’s algorithm could elevate political divisiveness and outrage, according to company documents viewed by the Wall Street Journal.

The internal memos show Facebook made the change because people were using the platform less, the paper reported. The social network wanted to promote posts with the most engagement to drive “meaningful social interactions,” or MSI, a metric it uses to measure how heavily people engage with posts.

Facebook developed a system to grade a post, a grade that would influence how much the platform would promote it. A “like” equaled one point, while reactions – including angry emojis that would sprout up on stories about controversial topics – accounted for five points, according to the Journal.

There was an upside: people viewed their close connections’ posts more frequently and considered them more meaningful and trustworthy. But the change wasn’t without adverse side effects: it prioritized content that was violent, toxic, false, politically divisive, and all-around outrageous, according to the report.

It especially slammed news publishers, who were forced to reorient their business strategies to reach the platform’s readers, who were more prone to clicking on or interacting with sensationalistic content over other forms of stories, like ones about self-care.

Facebook disputed the Journal’s characterization of the ranking system.

“Is a ranking change the source of the world’s divisions? No,” a spokesperson told Insider. “Research shows certain partisan divisions in our society have been growing for many decades, long before platforms like Facebook even existed. It also shows that meaningful engagement with friends and family on our platform is better for people’s well-being than the alternative.”

The spokesperson declined to say if the system is still in effect.

The effect of Facebook’s algorithm on news outlets and the spread of so-called clickbait articles, which are written specifically to hook readers’ attention, has been discussed for years in Silicon Valley and media circles. But The Journal reports that Facebook employees were worried the algorithm change amplified the angriest, most vocal voices online, the memos showed.

“Our approach has had unhealthy side effects on important slices of public content, such as politics and news,” Facebook data scientists wrote in a document, per The Journal.

“This is an increasing liability,” read a separate memo, according to the paper.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg wasn’t always open to implementing proposed solutions broadly across the platform. He said no to a fix that could have helped reduce false information across all topics on the platform because it could have caused people to spend less time on the platform, per the Journal.

Facebook’s algorithm and the role it plays in false and polarizing content online has taken center stage in recent years. The company has rolled out new changes as a result, especially after the 2020 presidential election, the pandemic, and the deadly insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6.

Facebook said in August that it would reduce the volume of political posts it puts in front of users after surveying people online, who felt “that there’s too much political content in their News Feeds,” as Axios reported.

The new process relies less on Facebook’s algorithm that determines how likely someone is to share or comment on a certain post based on their past engagement. It could impact news publishers that produce politics-centric content.

Read the full report on The Wall Street Journal here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Are you a geriatric millennial? It depends on how comfortable you are with TikTok, and whether you remember MySpace.

geriatric millennial
Geriatric millennials are familiar with both old and new forms of communication.

  • The term “geriatric millennial” divided the Internet this spring in a viral Medium article.
  • The author spoke to Insider about why it both resonated with and offended readers.
  • She also shared the hallmarks of a geriatric millennial and how they straddle the workplace’s digital divide.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Author and leadership expert Erica Dhawan never expected the term “geriatric millennial” to go viral.

A self-identified geriatric millennial (which she defines as elder millennials born in the early 1980s), Dhawan told Insider she first heard the term at brunch with friends and related to it. But when she wrote about this micro-generation’s influence in connecting older and younger generations in the workforce for Medium this past spring, it quickly went mainstream and divided the Internet.

While many, like Dhawan, related to the term, others were offended by it.

“I think that the fact that the word ‘geriatric’ carried such a negative connotation really also has the question: What’s wrong with being old?” she said. “The way that individuals reacted, I think should encourage all of us to start a reflection on how we view older members of our society.”

Dhawan said she’s spent a decade investigating, researching, and finding new ways to encourage collaboration and communication in the workplace, which she explores in her new book, “Digital Body Language.” She said that while interviewing American workers, she found that some micro-generations were “impossible to ignore.”

She said that geriatric millennials are unique because they straddle a digital divide between older and younger generations in the workplace, which enables them to bridge communication styles.

The hallmarks of this micro-generation aren’t meant to exclude younger millennials who may have experienced them as well, she added.

“What it’s really meant to do is pinpoint a specific moment in time where the digital tools were primitive and where we were coming of adulthood,” she said. “We can look at all millennials as being the same, but there are differences based on our experiences at different life stages.”

Meet the typical geriatric millennial, according to Dhawan.

You were born in the early 1980s, making you in your mid-to-late 30s or early 40s.

A woman wearing a blue top and white jeans is working on her living room floor with colourful toys next to her.

Dhawan defines geriatric millennials as those born from 1980 to 1985. That means they’re turning ages 41 to 36 this year. 

But age is just one component. “Micro-generations are not simply just the years you were born, but, the strongest indicator is really how you use and engage with technology,” Dhawan said. 

 

You remember PCs, the days of early dial-up, and MySpace.

classic pc

Whereas younger millennials don’t know a world without digital tools as a primary form of communication, Dhawan said, geriatric millennials remember when they were very primitive.

“They were the first generation to grow up with a PC in their homes. They joined the first social media communities on Facebook and MySpace. They remember dial-up connections, collect calls, and punch cards,” she added.

They also remember things like Napster for burning CDs, as well as the regular flip phone. “Those that are maybe two to five years older than us know truly a world of, you know, mobile phones and never had to memorize people’s phone numbers for landline,” she said.

 

 

But you also feel comfortable on TikTok and Clubhouse.

clubhouse app

While geriatric millennials are fluent in the early days of the internet and digital technology, they’ve also been able to easily adapt to newer forms of digital media, like TikTok, which may be unfamiliar to older generations like baby boomers and commonplace among younger generations like Gen Z.

“This is a unique cohort that straddles digital natives and digital adapters,” Dhawan said, adding that they’ve spent the same amount of years in both analogue and digital forms of communication, making them fluent in both. 

 

 

Despite your digital skills, you’re also aware of the importance of personal communication.

A woman speaks in a one-on-one professional setting with a bulletin board behind her.

Geriatric millennials also remember the importance of traditional body language, Dhawan said. “The lean-in, the direct eye contact … those are critical traits, even in our digital world.”

That means they’re comfortable with communication styles of boomers and Gen Xers, she added, while adapting to the the communication style of younger, digital native millennials and Gen Z.

“It’s critically important to keep adapting to the times while, remembering the importance of physical, face-to-face communication,” she said.

 

You act as a bridge in the workplace.

workplace

Dhawan believes that being skilled in both digital and personal forms of communication enables geriatric millennials to serve in a hybrid role in the workplace.

For example, she said, a geriatric millennial would know to send a Slack message to a Gen Z co-worker instead of calling them out of the blue, which they might find alarming. But they would also know to be mindful of an older co-worker’s video background and help walk them through such technology.

“They can help straddle the divide,” she said. “They can teach traditional communication skills to some of those younger employees and digital body language to older team members.”

She likened the geriatric millennial’s role to being a translator, akin to learning a new language in a new country. “They can cater to the needs of different people and have different degrees of understanding of the digital world, but also they have a patience for the digital world that maybe future generations won’t because they don’t know a world without it.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Billionaire investor Mike Novogratz compares crypto zealots to anti-vaxxers – and says GameStop fans show the same conviction

GettyImages 1281542990
Mike Novogratz.

  • Mike Novogratz compared crypto zealots to anti-vaxxers, in terms of their stubborn beliefs.
  • The Galaxy Digital boss said GameStop’s fans show a similar level of passion and commitment.
  • Novogratz disclosed that he shorts viral assets when they explode in popularity.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Bitcoin bull Mike Novogratz compared some cryptocurrency fans to anti-vaxxers in terms of their conviction, and noted GameStop’s followers display the same kind of blind devotion.

The billionaire investor and Galaxy Digital CEO spoke at the Barclays Financial Services Conference this week. He remarked that if he questioned cardano’s roughly $80 billion market capitalization on Twitter, he would be inundated with thousands of attacks by the coin’s supporters.

“It’s like telling a Manchester United fan that Man U sucks, or going to an Eagles game with the Giants’ jersey on,” Novogratz said, according to a transcript on Sentieo, a financial-research site.

“These ecosystems are unbelievably rabid,” he continued. “They’re passionate. It’s like an anti-vaxxer – you can’t tell an anti-vaxxer they’re wrong, right? They have personalized this stuff.”

Viral assets such as cardano, dogecoin, or GameStop and AMC shares don’t make sense to rational investors given their limited functions or heady valuations, Novogratz said. Yet online communities have sprung up around them, and diehard members have made owning and touting those assets a key part of their identities, he continued.

“GameStop is a crypto at this point, there’s no link to its profitability,” Novogratz said.

The Galaxy Digital boss revealed that he seeks to profit from the breathless, but often short-lived, excitement around meme stocks and altcoins.

“I love shorting, because that’s how I get longer the stuff I like,” he said. “The moment that community gets really big, you’re going to short it.”

However, Novogratz noted that he cashes out his profits once there’s a sell-off, as the support bases for viral assets have proven to be far more resilient than he expected.

Novogratz also trumpeted the crypto industry’s prospects at the conference. The sector is only now taking off, he said, and failing to invest in the space would be like missing the internet in the early 2000s.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to use the ‘secret conversation’ feature in Facebook Messenger to keep your chat secure

person using bright phone outside at night
Secret conversations keep your Messenger chats private.

  • You can make a “secret conversation” in Messenger by starting a new conversation and tapping the icon in the top-right corner.
  • Messenger’s secret conversations are encrypted, meaning that your messages are incredibly private – not even Facebook can read them.
  • Secret conversations are only available in the Messenger mobile app, not the website.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

In the past few years, encrypted messaging apps have become increasingly popular. Signal, Telegram – and now Messenger.

Despite being run by a company not known for its data security, Messenger’s “secret conversation” feature is a legitimately safe way to chat with friends and colleagues. Secret conversations are protected with end-to-end encryption, meaning that no one outside the chat can read what’s inside.

It’s similar to Vanish Mode, another Messenger feature that prioritizes secret and secure conversations.

If you care about privacy and want to use Messenger, secret conversations should be your go-to tool. Here’s how to start a secret conversation and customize its settings.

How to make a secret conversation in Messenger

Secret conversations are exclusive to the iPhone, iPad, and Android Messenger apps. You won’t find them in the Messenger desktop app or website.

1. Open the Messenger app and tap the compose message icon in the top-right corner.

2. A list of all your contacts will appear. Here, tap the button in the top-right corner – on an iPhone or iPad it’ll say Secret, while on an Android it’ll be a switch with a padlock icon.

Screenshots from both the iPhone and Android messenger apps, showing how to turn on a secret conversation.
Turn on the secret conversation mode by tapping the button in the top-right.

3. Tap the person who you want to have a secret conversation with. It has to be a one-on-one chat – you can’t have a secret group chat.

4. You’ll be brought into a secret conversation with the person you chose. Once you send a message, it’ll appear on their device.

A secret conversation in the iPhone Messenger app.
Your secret conversations are “end-to-end encrypted,” meaning they’re secure at all times.

If you’re Facebook friends with the person on the other end of the chat, you can enable disappearing messages as well. These let you put a timer on every message sent, so they’ll delete themselves after a short period of time.

1. At the top of the secret conversation, tap the other chatter’s name (iPhone or iPad) or the “i” icon (Android) to open the options menu.

2. Tap Disappearing Messages, and then choose how long you want messages to last.

The Disappearing Messages menu in the iPhone Messenger app.
If you enable disappearing messages, your messages can last up to a day.

Additionally, you can report the person you’re chatting with, block them, or just delete the chat. To do so, open the options menu again and tap Something’s Wrong, Block, or Delete Chat respectively.

The options menu of a secret conversation in the iPhone messenger app. The "Block," "Something's Wrong," and "Delete Chat" options are highlighted.
Secret conversations can be reported, even if disappearing messages are enabled.

How to log into Facebook on a computer or mobile device, even if you don’t know your passwordWhat a ‘This person is unavailable on Messenger’ error means on Facebook Messenger, and how to resolve itHow to deactivate Facebook Messenger on your phone and stop receiving chat messagesHow to change your birthday on Facebook using the website or app

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Bitcoin bull Mike Novogratz compares crypto zealots to anti-vaxxers – and says GameStop fans show the same conviction

GettyImages 1281542990
Mike Novogratz.

  • Mike Novogratz compared crypto zealots to anti-vaxxers, in terms of their stubborn beliefs.
  • The Galaxy Digital boss said GameStop’s fans show a similar level of passion and commitment.
  • Novogratz disclosed that he shorts viral assets when they explode in popularity.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Bitcoin bull Mike Novogratz compared some cryptocurrency fans to anti-vaxxers in terms of their conviction, and noted GameStop’s followers display the same kind of blind devotion.

The billionaire investor and Galaxy Digital CEO spoke at the Barclays Financial Services Conference this week. He remarked that if he questioned cardano’s roughly $80 billion market capitalization on Twitter, he would be inundated with thousands of attacks by the coin’s supporters.

“It’s like telling a Manchester United fan that Man U sucks, or going to an Eagles game with the Giants’ jersey on,” Novogratz said, according to a transcript on Sentieo, a financial-research site.

“These ecosystems are unbelievably rabid,” he continued. “They’re passionate. It’s like an anti-vaxxer – you can’t tell an anti-vaxxer they’re wrong, right? They have personalized this stuff.”

Viral assets such as cardano, dogecoin, or GameStop and AMC shares don’t make sense to rational investors given their limited functions or heady valuations, Novogratz said. Yet online communities have sprung up around them, and diehard members have made owning and touting those assets a key part of their identities, he continued.

“GameStop is a crypto at this point, there’s no link to its profitability,” Novogratz said.

The Galaxy Digital boss revealed that he seeks to profit from the breathless, but often short-lived, excitement around meme stocks and altcoins.

“I love shorting, because that’s how I get longer the stuff I like,” he said. “The moment that community gets really big, you’re going to short it.”

However, Novogratz noted that he cashes out his profits once there’s a sell-off, as the support bases for viral assets have proven to be far more resilient than he expected.

Novogratz also trumpeted the crypto industry’s prospects at the conference. The sector is only now taking off, he said, and failing to invest in the space would be like missing the internet in the early 2000s.

Read the original article on Business Insider

What a ‘This person is unavailable on Messenger’ error means on Facebook Messenger, and how to resolve it

Facebook Messenger
A message telling you “This person is unavailable on Messenger” means you can’t send messages.

  • If you see “This person is unavailable on Messenger” when trying to chat with someone, they might have blocked you.
  • It could also mean that they’ve deactivated or deleted their Messenger account, or been banned.
  • In some cases you might not see this error, and instead you’ll just be told your messages can’t be sent.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Despite its popularity, Facebook can be very vague when it comes to explaining why its apps aren’t working correctly. You can’t contact Facebook directly, which means relying on the platform’s Support Center to get help.

But not every error message is listed in the Support Center. For example: What does it mean when the Messenger app tells you “This person is unavailable on Messenger?”

Here’s a full guide to what the error message means, and how to fix it if you think something’s wrong.

What does ‘This person is unavailable on Messenger’ mean?

If you’re seeing this message in your conversation with someone on Messenger, it means that you can’t chat with them – obviously. But what causes it?

A screenshot of a Facebook Messenger conversation, where the “This person is unavailable on Messenger" is visible.
If you see this error, it means that you can’t send messages.

There are a few common reasons.

  • The person you’re trying to contact has blocked you, either on Messenger or Facebook as a whole. If you’re not sure whether you’ve been blocked, check out our article on deciphering the signs of a Facebook block.
A Facebook Messenger window saying that the user has blocked the person on the other end of the chat.
You may have been blocked by the person you’re trying to chat with.

The “This person is unavailable on Messenger” error can pop up when any of these happen. And unfortunately, there’s no way to get around it by yourself – you’ll have to convince the person you want to chat with to unblock you or make a new Messenger account.

At least, assuming there hasn’t just been a glitch. If the error message appears but you’re sure that you’re not blocked and your friend is still on Messenger, try logging out and back into your account. If that doesn’t work, try uninstalling and reinstalling the Messenger app. This could fix the issue.

How to deactivate your Facebook account on an iPhoneHow to use Messenger’s Vanish Mode, a feature that lets you send disappearing messagesHow to change your birthday on Facebook using the website or appHow to turn off active status on Facebook and Messenger to appear offline everywhere you’re logged in

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to loop a YouTube video on a computer or in the mobile app

senior man watching guitar video tutorial at home on tablet with guitar in hand
Knowing how to loop a YouTube video can be useful when you’re watching instructional videos.

  • You can loop a YouTube video on the desktop website via the video settings.
  • YouTube has also added the loop feature for the mobile app, so you can loop videos and playlists.
  • You can also use third-party sites to loop entire videos, or parts of videos, if desired.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

With tons of new content being uploaded to YouTube every day, viewers are at no loss for something new to watch. But sometimes you don’t want something new, so setting a video to loop over and over again can be a good option.

Looping a video can be helpful if you’re learning a new skill from a YouTube tutorial, or if you simply want an ambient video to continuously play in the background at an event.

Here’s how to set up the feature on desktop or via the mobile app.

How to loop a YouTube video on desktop

This works regardless of the web browser you’re using.

1. On the YouTube website, go to the video you want to put on repeat.

2. Right-click the video and select Loop in the pop-up.

Screenshot of "Loop" option on YouTube website
Click “Loop.”

How to loop a YouTube video on the mobile app

YouTube recently added the loop feature to the mobile app. It works for iPhone, iPad, and Android.

1. Open the YouTube app on your device and navigate to the video you want to loop.

2. Tap the screen to reveal the icon of three dots in the top-right corner, then tap the three dots to open the video menu.

Screenshot of three-dot icon on video on YouTube mobile app
Tap the three-dot icon.

3. In the pop-up, select Loop video. Note that the loop option does not appear in the pop-up if the advertisement before your video is still playing – you must wait for the ad to end before you can loop.

Screenshot of "Loop video" option on YouTube app
Select “Loop video.”

To turn off the loop feature, you’d need to repeat this process. You can also loop playlists by going into a video in the playlist you want to loop and setting that video to loop.

How to create a YouTube playlist, add or remove videos, and set its privacy settingsHow to delete a YouTube playlist using your desktop or the mobile appHow to play YouTube videos in the background on your iPhone, without having to keep the app openYou can’t see who liked your comment on YouTube, but you can see how many likes your post has – here’s how

Read the original article on Business Insider