How to watch basketball at the Tokyo Olympics, including the new 3-on-3 tournament

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Kevin Durant dribbles for USA Basketball.
Kevin Durant is one of the many NBA stars playing in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

  • The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature men’s and women’s tournaments for 5-on-5 and 3-on-3 basketball.
  • Olympic basketball games will be spread across NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.
  • The NBC sports app will stream every game, and US men’s games will also stream live on Peacock ($5/month).

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The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature professional basketball players from the top international leagues as well as the debut of 3-on-3 events, an Olympic first. Twelve nations have qualified for the traditional men’s and women’s 5-on-5 tournaments, while eight teams will play in men’s and women’s 3-on-3 events.

Players from the NBA, WNBA and other professional basketball leagues from around the world will compete in the 5-on-5 tournament. The US men’s team, a perennial favorite, is led by stars like Kevin Durant and Damian Lillard, but they’ll have to face top international talent like Rudy Gobert of France and Luka Doncic of Slovenia. The US women’s basketball team has won six consecutive Olympic gold medals dating back to 1996. This year’s squad is led by stars like Diana Taurasi, Breanna Stewart, and Brittney Griner.

The 3-on-3 basketball events will use a different format than traditional basketball, with shots being counted as one and two points, rather than two and three points. Teams win by scoring 21 points, or by leading after 10 minutes.

The 3-on-3 teams will play each other in a round-robin format to determine seeding for the medal tournament. The 5-on-5 teams are separated into three groups for match play leading to a final tournament.

How to watch Olympic basketball

Nigeria's Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States' Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade
Nigeria’s Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States’ Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women’s Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade.

Olympic basketball coverage begins with 3-on-3 events on July 23; 5-on-5 match play begins on July 24. To watch Olympic basketball you’ll need access to NBC’s family of networks. Select games will air on NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.

If you already subscribe to a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s channels, you can stream all Olympic basketball events through the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com. This is the best way to catch all the action live, as a lot of the broadcast coverage will be shown as replays.

In addition, all US men’s basketball games will be streamed live on Peacock Premium, NBC’s standalone streaming service. Peacock Premium starts at $5 a month for ad-supported streaming.

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If you’re not already subscribed to NBC channels through your cable provider, you can sign up for a live TV streaming service to follow Olympic basketball online.

Sling TV is one of the most affordable options, starting at $35 a month for Sling Blue with NBC, NBC Sports, and USA ($10 for new subscribers), and an additional $17 for CNBC and the Olympic Channel, which require extra sports and news packages. That’s $52 in total, or $27 if you’re a new Sling subscriber.

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Other live TV options – like YouTube TV, FuboTV, and Hulu + Live TV – also include access to the necessary NBC stations but, while they all feature more channels than Sling, they’re also more expensive with prices starting at $65/month each. If you’re just signing up to watch the Tokyo Games, Sling is a more economical option.

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Men’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Kevin Durant of Team USA
Draymond Green and Kevin Durant of Team USA basketball.

July 25

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. France (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 12 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
Argentina vs. Slovenia (Group C) 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
Australia vs. Italy (Group B) 11:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 3 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
France vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 5:15 p.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 11:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Australia vs. Germany (Group B) 10:30 a.m. ET USA

August 1

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 1:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 2

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 12:15 a.m. ET Peacock

August 5

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 6 p.m. ET (replay) USA
Men’s semifinals 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 10:30 p.m. ET NBC, Peacock

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 8

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 1:30 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

Women’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird for Team USA.
Diana Taurasi (left) and Sue Bird compete for Team USA.

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET USA
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 2:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay) USA

July 30

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET

USA

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 8 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
Canada vs. Spain (Group A) 11:30 p.m. p.m. ET USA

August 2

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group B) 12:40 a.m. ET USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 4 p.m. ET (replay) USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals 6 p.m. ET on (replay) USA
Women’s quarterfinals 10 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals 10 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals 4:15 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 8 p.m. ET NBC

August 8

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 9 a.m. ET (replay) USA

3-on-3 Olympic basketball schedule

3x3 basketball
A 3×3 basketball test event in Japan in May 2021.

July 24

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 12:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
US vs. Mongolia and US vs. France 8 p.m. ET CNBC
Basketball and archery elimination rounds 10:40 p.m. ET USA

July 25

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 4 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan 4 a.m. ET CNBC
Men’s and women’s pool play 6:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s semifinals games 5:30 a.m. ET USA
Gold and bronze medal games 8 p.m. ET NBC Sports
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How to watch soccer at the Tokyo Olympics – women’s group matches begin on July 21

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USWNT US Women's National Team Soccer
US women’s national soccer team members Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe celebrate.

  • Olympic soccer will begin before the opening ceremonies with women’s group matches starting July 21.
  • Games will air on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel via cable and live streaming services.
  • The women’s gold medal match is August 5, while the men’s gold medal will be decided on August 7.

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Soccer will be one of the first sports to begin competition at the Tokyo Olympics, with women’s group stage matches starting on July 21 and the men’s matches starting on July 22. The Tokyo Opening Ceremonies will be held on July 23 and Olympic soccer competition will continue through August 7.

A total of 24 nations will compete in soccer during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with 16 qualifying men’s teams and 12 women’s teams. You can watch select games on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel through cable and live streaming services.

While Olympic men’s soccer has been restricted to players 23-years-old and younger since 1992, the one-year delay of the 2020 games led to the age limit being increased to 24. Men’s teams can also name up to three senior players above the age limit to compete in the Olympics. Brazil won the men’s soccer gold medal as the host nation in 2016, led by international superstar Neymar.

Women’s teams don’t have roster restrictions, and the US women’s national soccer team, or USWNT, is bringing back most of its players from the 2019 World Cup championship squad. The Americans plan to return to gold medal form after losing in the quarter-finals of the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The US Men’s soccer team was eliminated from Olympic contention after a loss to Honduras in a June qualifying tournament. USWNT has won four Olympic gold medals including a 2012 victory over Japan, while the men’s team has never won a gold medal and hasn’t qualified for the Olympics since 2008.

How to watch Olympic soccer

You can watch select Olympic soccer games on NBC Sports, USA, the Olympic Channel, Telemundo, and NBC Universo. Most of the games in Tokyo will air during the early morning hours in the US. The most important Olympic soccer matches will air on USA and NBC Sports Network.

If you have an authenticated pay-TV provider with access to the required NBC stations, you can stream every Olympic soccer match via NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app.

If you don’t have a cable provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling TV is the most affordable choice to get every Olympic soccer channel. The Sling Blue plan starts at $35/month for access to NBC, NBCSN, and USA. New subscribers can get their first month for just $10. You can add the Olympic channel for an additional $11/month with the Sports Extra package.

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If you can’t watch the games live, NBC will provide daily highlights and evening recaps of each day’s events. In addition to primetime coverage on NBC, you can visit NBCOlympics.com or download Peacock, NBC’s streaming service, to watch free soccer highlights and clips from other sports.

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Women’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of women’s soccer matches for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 21

Event Time Channel
Great Britain vs. Chile (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
China vs. Brazil (Group F) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Sweden (Group G) 4:30 a.m. ET USA
Japan vs. Canada (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

Zambia vs. Netherlands (Group F) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Australia vs. New Zealand (Group G) 7:30 a.m. ET USA

July 24

Event Time Channel
Chile vs. Canada (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET TBA
China vs. Zambia (Group F) 4 a.m. ET TBA
Sweden vs. Australia (Group G) 4:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network
Japan vs. Great Britain (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET TBA
Netherlands vs. Brazil (Group F) 7 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. United States 7:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network and Telemundo

July 27

Event Time Channel
Sweden vs. New Zealand (Group G)

4 a.m. ET

TBA
United States v Australia (Group G) 4 a.m. ET USA
Chile vs. Japan (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Canada vs. Great Britain (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Brazil vs. Zambia (Group F) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Netherlands vs. China (Group F)

7:30 a.m. ET

TBA

July 30

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Women’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET TBA

August 2

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals one 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals two 7 a.m. ET USA

August 5

Event Time Channel
Women’s bronze medal match 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s gold medal match 10 p.m. ET USA

Men’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of men’s soccer matches announced for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 22

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Spain (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Mexico vs. France (Group A) 4 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo
New Zealand vs. South Korea (Group B) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Cote d’Ivoire vs. Saudi Arabia (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Argentina vs. Australia (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Japan vs. South Africa (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Honduras vs. Romania (Group B) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Brazil vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo

July 25

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Argentina (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
France vs. South Africa (Group A) 4 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. Honduras (Group B) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Brazil vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Australia vs. Spain (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Universo
Japan vs. Mexico (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Telemundo
Romania vs. South Korea (Group B) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Saudi Arabia vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET TBA

July 28

Event Time Channel
Saudi Arabia vs. Brazil (Group D) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Germany vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Romania vs. New Zealand (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
South Korea vs. Honduras (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Australia vs. Egypt (Group C) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Spain vs. Argentina (Group C) 7 a.m. ET Universo
France vs. Japan (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

South Africa vs. Mexico (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo

July 31

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET USA

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals one 4 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s semifinals two 7 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s bronze medal match 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal match 7:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
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Sling TV is the best live TV streaming service for cord cutters on a budget

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  • Starting at $35 a month, Sling TV is one of the most affordable live TV streaming services.
  • Despite a tricky user interface, Sling TV’s streaming quality and channel offerings are excellent.
  • Sling TV plans come with networks like ESPN, CNN, TBS, Food Network, and BBC America.

Sling TV Review and How It works 4x3
Sling TV’s plans start at $35 a month for live TV streaming.

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When stacked up to other live TV streaming options, Sling TV is one of the most affordable in the industry. The Sling Orange and Blue plans each cost just $35 a month, offering a solid selection of live channels.

That comes out to just over $1 a day each month. For the money, Sling TV provides live streaming access to networks like FX, CNN, AMC, ESPN, Disney, and more. It’s nearly half the cost of competing services like Hulu + Live TV, but you don’t get quite as many channels as those more expensive options.

As an added bonus, new customers can even get their first month for only $10. But, does more affordable translate to better value compared to other streaming platforms? We put the service to the test to see if Sling TV is a viable alternative to cable and satellite.

What is Sling TV?

Sling TV is one of the cheapest options to stream live TV, and it features a selection of many popular channels. The service also includes access to a library of on-demand shows, along with support for recording programs to watch later.

Sling offers a few different plans, as well as add-on channels and packages. The main options are Sling Blue ($35/month), Sling Orange ($35/month), and the Sling Orange/Blue bundle ($50/month).

Orange features the least amount of channels at 33, while Blue includes 44 channels overall. The bundle combines both plans, but since some networks overlap between Orange and Blue, the bundle ends up including a total of 50 channels.

How much is Sling TV?

Sling TV comes in three plans: Orange, Blue, and an Orange/Blue bundle. Orange and Blue each cost $35 a month, while the bundle costs $50 a month.

As part of a special promotion, new members can get their first month of Orange or Blue for just $10. New members can also get a discount on their first month of the Orange/Blue bundle, bringing the price down to $25.

Sling’s promotion tends to alternate between a $10 introductory month and a $25 introductory month, so it’s unclear how long the better deal will last.

Compared to other live TV streaming services, like Hulu + Live TV and YouTube TV, Sling TV subscriptions can cost as much as $30 less per month. You get fewer channels with Sling, but the savings make it a better option for budget streamers.

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What channels come with Sling TV?

Sling tv  30+ channels 4x3
You can access the Sling TV app on a variety of devices.

Both Orange and Blue come with a base package of the same 27 channels, including CNN, BBC America, TBS, Food Network, HGTV, and many more. In addition to the base package, both plans have their share of unique channels.

Orange has six unique channels including Disney Channel, ESPN networks, FreeForm, and Motortrend. Blue, on the other hand, has 17 unique channels including Discovery, Fox and NBC (in select markets), NFL Network, USA, and more.

In addition to live TV, Sling comes with an extensive selection of on-demand content from its channel lineup, including titles like “Real Housewives” and “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.” Sling also has several genre-based add-ons starting at $6 a month.

Before signing up for Sling, we recommend you check out our full breakdown of all the Sling channels and extra packages available to ensure that your favorite networks are included.

How do I stream Sling TV?

Sling TV lets you use a number of devices to stream channels including Apple TV, Roku, Fire TV, Chromecast, iOS and Android devices, Xbox Series X|S, web browsers, and more.

For a full list, the streaming service details all of its supported devices on its website.

Is Sling TV worth it?

Sling TV in living room lifestyle
The Sling TV interface isn’t the best, but it’s getting an update this year.

Despite Sling TV being cheaper than most other live TV streaming options, it maintains great channel offerings and quality playback on par with the competition.

On that front, the service is easily worth the $35/month cost of admission. With over 30 channels on its Blue and Orange plans, Sling TV is one of the most economical ways to stream live TV.

When it comes to cheaper live TV streaming options, Philo offers 66 channels for $25 a month – $10 less than Sling’s base plans. Though Philo includes more storage and its catalog features some networks missing from Sling, like Animal Planet and MTV, it doesn’t offer any local channels. Philo is also lacking in sports coverage since it doesn’t carry channels like ESPN or NFL Network.

With those factors in mind, we think Sling is the better budget option for most people who want a cheaper alternative to cable. That said, there are some drawbacks to keep in mind when choosing Sling.

Sling’s current interface could use some work

One downside is the user interface Sling uses on the majority of its apps. In short, it isn’t particularly attractive or intuitive.

The interface lacks a channel-surfing option, which means you can’t flip through stations like you would on cable. This limits you to a home page broken into horizontal sections, starting with your “Favorite” channels if you’ve selected any.

It’s a useful shortcut, but depending on the size of your screen you’ll only see three to five channels at a time, and you’ll be doing a lot of side-scrolling. Below that you get access to your DVR recordings – Sling TV offers 50 hours of free DVR storage in its base package although you can get 200 hours for an extra $5 a month.

If you’re looking for a more traditional channel guide interface, you’ll find it in the “Guide” tab, but since there are no numbers associated with the channels, you’ll once again find yourself doing a lot of scrolling.

An updated interface is in on the way with key improvements

Sling TV is set to launch a number of changes to its app soon. The streaming service announced a beta app in May 2021. The updated app first became available on select Fire TV devices and features a new home page and a vertical sidebar with a DVR tab. It will be added to more devices throughout 2021, according to a press release.

We got to try the new app with a Fire TV Stick 4K and it’s a clear improvement. The home screen now includes a number of title recommendations based on shows and movies you’ve watched.

Additionally, Sling TV‘s channel guide – which you can find on the app’s sidebar – now lets you surf dozens of channels just like a traditional cable plan. You can also choose to record shows as you navigate through the guide.

You can scroll between tabs like “Favorites” and “Recents” on the top of the guide to find certain channels easier. While there still aren’t numbers associated with channels, you can easily find what you’re looking for with other tabs like “A-Z,” “Sports,” “News,” “Movies,” and more.

Aside from the guide, each channel has “Info” and “Explore” options. The “Info” option lets you see on-demand content and programs set to air on a channel in the future. Meanwhile, the “Explore” option lets you navigate all upcoming shows and movies.

The bottom line

Sling new interface
Sling TV is a great option for cord cutters on a budget.

With plans starting at $35 a month, Sling TV remains one of the best options there is to stream live TV on a budget. New members can even get $25 off their first month, making it an affordable service to test out if you’re on the fence.

Even though the current app’s interface is less than ideal, an upcoming update should alleviate any worries you might have about navigating through your favorite channels.

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We compared Sling’s Orange and Blue streaming plans, and Blue offers the best value with more live TV channels

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Sling Orange vs. Sling Blue vs. Sling Orange and Sling Blue 4x3
  • Sling TV remains one of the most affordable live TV streaming services on the market.
  • There are two plans, Orange and Blue, that each cost $35 a month.
  • Sling Orange has ESPN and Disney, but Sling Blue has more channels overall, including NBC and Fox.

For the money-savvy cord-cutter, Sling’s live TV streaming service is hard to beat. At $35 a month for over 30 channels, it’s easily one of the most affordable options on the market, beating competitors like Hulu + Live TV ($65/month), AT&T TV ($70/month), and YouTubeTV ($65/month) by a wide margin.

Sling TV offers two different streaming packages, Orange and Blue, each for the same $35 monthly charge following a discounted $25 fee for the first month.

Many of the channels on Orange and Blue overlap, but there are some differences that could sway you toward one package or the other. You can combine the two services for $50 a month, but that brings the cost closer to Sling’s competitors’, so you wouldn’t be saving nearly as much money as you could.

If you’re on a budget, it’s best to choose between the two Sling services, and for me, there’s a clear winner. All things considered, Sling Blue is simply the better value. 

What are the channel differences between Sling Orange and Sling Blue?

Sling Orange offers the Disney Channel and other Disney-owned networks like ESPN, several ESPN secondary channels, and Freeform. Meanwhile, Sling Blue omits the Disney-owned networks in favor of more channels overall, including local NBC and Fox stations in select markets.

You can find a full list of Sling Orange channels here, and a full list of Sling Blue channels here.

While the Disney content is valuable – I streamed “Halloweentown” the moment I discovered it among Sling’s on-demand offerings – with Disney Plus now in the picture, its inclusion with Sling is no longer the draw it once was. If you’re a true Disney fan, Disney Plus might be your best bet anyway.

For my money, I think Sling Blue‘s more robust channel selection is simply a better value.

Though you don’t get Disney or ESPN, Blue offers an additional 11 channels. In fact, Blue has 17 unique channels in its catalog compared to the six channels unique to Orange.

Parents and sports fans should still find plenty to watch on Blue as well, since it features Nick Jr. for the kids who might miss Disney – I was always more of a Nickelodeon kid anyway – and a host of sports channels, including Fox Sports and the NFL Network. In addition to these, Blue offers some lifestyle channels you don’t get with Orange, like USA, Bravo, and TLC.

Can I watch local channels on Sling Orange and Sling Blue?

If you’re attached to your local channels, Blue is also the clear choice, as Orange doesn’t offer local channels at all.

Blue offers local NBC and Fox channels, though you do have to live in an Designated Market Area to gain access to them. Sling lists all of the supported areas for NBC and Fox on its website. If you live outside of these regions, you unfortunately won’t have the NBC and Fox channels as part of your slate.

Sling TV Review and How It works 4x3

Multi-streams

While the channel choices are likely going to be your main motivator for choosing Orange or Blue, they also differ in how many simultaneous streams you can watch. With Orange, you can only stream on one device at a time, while Blue allows you three, so if you have a large household or plan to share an account with a friend, Blue is your best bet.

Sling provided a login to test the service, and while I was watching on Orange, I kept getting kicked off because someone else was trying to stream on the same account. It was so annoying that I immediately knew that once I committed to cord-cutting full time, I was going with Blue and keeping my password closely guarded.

The bottom line

With two services that each cost $35 a month, most people will be better off opting for the one that gives them the the most content for their money. In this case, that’s the Sling Blue plan.

For me, Blue wins over Orange in every category. Sure, Orange gets you Disney and ESPN, but if you’re worried about kids’ content, Blue makes up for it with Nick Jr. If you’re worried about sports content, Blue includes three sports channels. With Blue, you get nearly a dozen more total channels, including local networks if you live near most major cities. Blue also allows you three simultaneous streams while Orange allows you just one, so you don’t have to worry about keeping your password locked away in a safe.

Blue simply offers more value for your money. But, if you absolutely must have Disney and ESPN on top of all the channels Blue offers, you can always combine the services for $50 a month and you won’t have to worry about missing a thing.

That said, I don’t think the $15 increase is worth it just for the ESPN and Disney channels, especially with Disney Plus now on the market. I’m sticking with Blue for now, and I’ll be over here streaming “Good Eats” on Sling On-Demand for the next several days.

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A complete price breakdown for Sling TV packages

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How Much is Sling TV 4x3

  • Sling is one of the most affordable live TV streaming platforms you can subscribe to.
  • It offers two versions of its streaming service – Orange and Blue – each for $35 a month.
  • Bundle both packages and you’ll get a bit of a discount at $50 a month.

Cord cutting – or ditching cable – is all about freeing yourself from the confines of contracts, getting rid of bulky hardware, and, most importantly, saving money. But many of the live TV streaming services out there are creeping up in price, ever closer to the threshold that might cause you to reconsider canceling that cable subscription after all.

But Sling remains one of the options on the market that is truly much cheaper than a cable subscription. Though you may make some sacrifices in the user-interface department – it’s a bit clunky and not as intuitive as some of the more expensive services – the streaming quality is top-notch, making its cost-effectiveness a no-brainer if Sling carries the channels you watch.

How much does Sling cost?

Sling offers two different channel bundles, Orange and Blue, and each one costs the same at $35 a month. While the services are largely the same, there are a few channel differences between the two packages. 

Sling Orange gives you access to a total of 33 channels, including ESPN and Disney Channel. This plan also includes 10 hours of DVR storage and support for streaming on one device at a time.

While Sling Blue doesn’t include Disney Channel or ESPN networks, it makes up for it by adding on other channels like Bravo, Discovery, NFL Network, and – in select areas only – NBC and Fox. In total, Sling Blue offers 44 channels. It includes 10 hours of DVR and supports streaming on up to three devices at the same time. 

If your little one absolutely can’t miss “DuckTales” on Disney Channel and you can’t live without “The Real Housewives” on Bravo, you can bundle the two packages together and get a small multi-service discount. Instead of paying $35 times two, the bundle package is $50 a month for around 53 channels. You can find a full list of channels on Orange and Blue here

As a special introductory offer, new Sling subscribers will get their first month of Orange or Blue for $10 off. At that price, it’s a great opportunity to see if the service is right for you without sinking a ton of cash into trying it out.

Does Sling offer add-on packages?

Additionally, Sling offers a ton of different add-on options if you want to beef up your channel selection. For $5 to $11 a month, you can add mini-bundles like Sports Extra, Kids Extra, Comedy Extra, News Extra, Lifestyle Extra, Heartland Extra, or Hollywood Extra. Each offers a handful of channels in the genre you select. 

You can get four of the mini-bundles – Kids Extra, News Extra, Lifestyle Extra, and Comedy Extra – for $13 a month. If you have the Orange + Blue bundle, the Sports Extra package – with channels like ESPNU, ESPNEWS, NBA TV, and the NHL Network – will cost you $15 extra a month.

Sling comes with 50 hours of DVR storage included, but you can upgrade to 200 hours for an additional $5 a month.

If you want to package all the extras together, Sling offers its Total TV Deal. This bundle includes all seven add-ons plus cloud DVR storage for an additional $21 a month with Orange or Blue, or an extra $27 a month with the Orange + Blue bundle.

Sling is also not slacking on their premium channel add-ons either. They offer a Showtime package for an additional $10 a month, a Starz package for $9 a month, and EPIX for $5 a month. You can also pay for an international sports add-on for $60 a year as well as add-ons from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America.

What devices can I watch Sling on?

If you have a smart TV, it’s likely the Sling app is already installed, and you can start streaming right away once you sign up. Sling is also available on most streaming players, including Roku, Fire TV, Chromecast, and Apple TV.

If you don’t have any of those products, Sling has a device offer to get you streaming quickly and affordably. If you subscribe and pre-pay for two months of Sling, they’ll throw in a free AirTV Mini device. Click here for full details on current device bundles from Sling. 

All in all, Sling might not have the beautiful interface that Hulu + Live TV sports has or the channel selection that Youtube TV boasts, but for the money, Sling is the best low-cost service out there. The streaming quality is comparable to cable, and if Sling carries the channels you watch most often, the price can’t be beat.

Read the original article on Business Insider