5 apps and social media platforms you should be using to connect with clients

social media phone
Apps like Slack and Vox provide instant access to clients.

  • Tiffani Purdy is the CEO of New Paradigm Biz Bestie and a marketing and sales strategist.
  • While most people rely on email marketing, Purdy suggests finding new ways to connect with your clients.
  • She uses Slack, Facebook Groups, and Telegram to share content with clients and grow her business.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

For the last 20-plus years, email has become the standard form of communication for reaching out to clients. Ask any marketer for the last 10 years in particular, and they’ll say one of the top things a business should focus on is building their (email) list.

Snail mail is just too slow, and this increasingly-fast paced world makes a classic phone call unrealistic – what, are you going to call each person individually on your list? Or worse, are you going to have an automated bot interrupt their day with a phone call that is devoid of actual communication?

But now, email too is reaching a ceiling. Is your email going to their SPAM folder? Is it going to their “junk” email address that they use to sign up for all the mailing lists? Is it getting lost between an advertisement from their favorite clothing store and a digital copy of their phone bill?

I don’t think it’s time for us to throw away email entirely – especially not when it comes to communicating information to your warm audience – but if you’re really trying to maintain contact with your existing customers, you might want to try one of these increasingly popular options.

Slack

Everyone in the B2B world knows about Slack by now – and for a good reason. Slack’s no-nonsense interface is perfect for communicating with all your clients at once, or sending messages to people in specific groups by sorting them into different Channels. If you love the flexibility of list segmentation, you’ll appreciate the functionality of Slack.

I personally like using Slack as my general hub for connecting with my mastermind clients. We have different Channels for asking questions, for sharing wins, and for my team to make announcements that everyone needs to see. I’ve also created private Channels for each member to have direct access to me and my team, for scheduling calls, and sharing documents that don’t need to be shared with the whole group.

Even better? Slack can be used three ways: In your browser, in a Desktop app, or with a mobile app.

Facebook Groups

This one has its pros and cons, but it’s definitely a contender worth discussing! While most people choose to use Facebook Groups as a strategy for growing a free community of warm leads – you could just as easily use a Facebook Group as the home of your paid community.

On the plus side, a Facebook Group offers you a lot of different ways to communicate with the people inside your community. Live videos, photos, GIFs, polls, posts – your options are nearly limitless. And with Facebook giving you the ability to create modules and lessons inside Groups, you could easily sell and host an entire group program or online course inside a Facebook Group (saving you hundreds, even thousands, a year in course hosting fees using a system like Teachable or Thinkific).

Of course, the obvious downside of this option is that you have to have a Facebook account in order to join a Group, and your clients may not have a Facebook account. (Give “people leaving Facebook” a quick search – there’s a lot of movement away from the platform right now.)

Telegram and Voxer

These two apps are nearly identical in terms of functionality: They’re both messenger apps that give you the ability to send and receive voice messages in real time, like a walkie-talkie. You can use these like a classic one-to-one personal message, or you can create a group message that includes everyone on one thread.

While Voxer is more basic in its very orange UI, Telegram is going to be the prime choice for creatives and millennials who value personalization and expression.

I personally like using these kinds of apps for communicating with my top-level clients, who get more intimate, personal access to me. They love getting to hear my “off the cuff” thoughts on different things that they’re encountering in their business without having to wait for a formal group call or one-on-one session, and I love getting to share my insights in a quick, efficient way that can also benefit the other clients in this group who may have the same struggles or questions.

Instagram Close Friends

This one might be a surprising choice, but it’s growing in popularity as an alternative to Facebook Groups. You won’t be able to host a course for free on Instagram like you can with a Facebook Group, but you can still create a fun, exclusive place for your customers to stay in the loop.

I’ve seen this strategy work best for digital creators, in particular, such as podcasters or YouTubers. Using something like Patreon to collect membership fees from your audience, you can have each user fill out a quick Google form to get their Instagram handle upon signing up to get access to your exclusive content. After that, you’ll go to your Instagram Settings, tap on “Close Friends,” and from there you can hit the + to add new accounts to your Close Friends list. You don’t even have to follow an account to add them to your list!

This is a fun way to take something you’re already doing (creating content) for an audience who is already there consuming it, and monetizing it!

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Parler claims it was also dropped by Slack after Amazon and other tech giants cut ties with the controversial social media company

Parler
This illustration picture shows social media application logo from Parler displayed on a smartphone with its website in the background.

  • Parler CEO John Matze claimed in a court filing Wednesday that Slack had “canceled their services” to his company.
  • Matze claimed, in a lawsuit against Amazon’s AWS over its decision to cut ties with Parler, that Slack had cited “a violation of their own terms of service based on AWS’s decision to drop Parler.”
  • “Losing Slack makes it extremely difficult to effectively enforce our terms of service with our almost 600 volunteer and paid Jury members,” Matze said.
  • Major tech companies including Amazon, Twilio, Apple, and Google have cut ties with Parler in recent days amid widespread reports that rioters used the app to organize and incite violence at the US Capitol last week.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Slack has joined the growing list of tech companies refusing to do business with Parler, according to Parler CEO John Matze.

“Slack Technologies, which provided a chat messaging system for coordinating with the Parler Jury that enforces our terms of service, abruptly canceled their services to Parler,” Matze claimed in a court filing Wednesday.

Slack did not respond to a request for comment on this story.

Matze submitted the filing as part of Parler’s antitrust lawsuit against Amazon’s cloud computing arm, Amazon Web Services.

Parler filed the lawsuit on Monday after AWS cut ties with the controversial social media company amid widespread reports that rioters who seized the US Capitol last week had used Parler to organize and incite violence.

“AWS’s highly publicized break… allowed the media to mischaracterize Parler in ways that have alienated Parler’s partners,” Matze claimed, adding that, in canceling its contract with Parler, Slack cited “a violation of their own terms of service based on AWS’s decision to drop Parler.”

“Losing Slack makes it extremely difficult to effectively enforce our terms of service with our almost 600 volunteer and paid Jury members,” Matze said in the filing.

Parler has faced massive fallout in the wake of last week’s violence as various business partners have cut ties.

Apple and Google removed Parler’s app from their app stores, also citing its alleged refusal to take down violent content. Not long afterward, many of Parler’s service providers, including Twilio, Okta, and Zendesk, removed Parler from their platforms as well.

Parler’s platform was knocked offline over the weekend after AWS suspended its contract, and with Google Cloud, IBM, and Oracle all refusing to take on Parler, the company has reportedly enlisted the services of Epik, a domain registrar known for hosting far-right content.

Read more: Inside the rapid and mysterious rise of Parler, the ‘free speech’ Twitter alternative, which created a platform for conservatives by burning the Silicon Valley script

Parler rose to notoriety in recent months as mainstream social media sites have faced increasing pressure to crack down on hate speech, misinformation, and calls for violence.

Following the US presidential election in November, Trump supporters flocked to alternative social networks, including Parler, to plan election protests after Facebook and other sites banned groups that pushed debunked conspiracies. From November 3 to November 9, Parler was downloaded around 530,000 times in the US, according to data from Apptopia.

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