Sidney Powell, who faces $4 billion defamation lawsuits from election-tech firms, baselessly claimed there is a ‘secret server’ where all US votes go to be manipulated

sidney powell
Sidney Powell.

  • Former Trump attorney Sidney Powell bizarrely claimed US votes are manipulated in a secret server.
  • There is no evidence to support the claim – Powell has shared multiple debunked conspiracy theories.
  • Two election technology firms are already suing Powell for defamation in lawsuits totaling $4 billion.

Former Trump attorney Sidney Powell has shared a baseless claim that all US votes are sent to a secret server where they are manipulated to rig the outcome of elections.

“What I think really has to be discovered is that there is a secret server that all the votes go to where they manipulate the heck out of it,” Powell told “The Ledger Report,” a conservative talk show, on Friday.

“We need to know where their servers are and what they’re doing with them, and we need the data from them and we need the data from the machines.

“But they’re going as fast as they can, right now, everywhere they can to completely revamp the machines with new software that erases everything that shows what they did.”

Powell comments followed her previous claims about widespread voter fraud in November’s presidential election.

She gained prominence as a member of former President Donald Trump’s legal team after sharing outlandish conspiracy theories about voter fraud during the 2020 election, alleging that the election-technology firm Dominion Voting Systems secretly aided its rival firm Smartmatic in a bid to steal the election from Trump.

Trump fired Powell from his legal team after she made the claims publicly.

Legal filings later showed that Trump staffers had warned Powell that her claims about the two firms were false, but that they did not deter her from repeating the claims.

Dominion and Smartmatic are now demanding vast sums from Powell for defamation as a result of her claims against them. Dominion has filed a $1.3 billion lawsuit against Powell, while Smartmatic has filed a $2.7 billion lawsuit against Powell and other Trump allies.

Powell said in a separate interview last week that she didn’t have “tiniest fraction of that amount of assets,” but that she planned to continue litigation to fight the legal cases against her.

She had countersued Dominion in September and doubled down on some of her claims against the company.

Eric Coomer, a former Dominion employee who was embroiled in the conspiracy theories against his firm, is also suing Powell and others for defamation.

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Large portions of the military remain unvaccinated despite looming deadlines and COVID-19 deaths

A soldier watches another soldier receive his COVID-19 vaccination.
Portions of the military remain unvaccinated as the varying deadlines for each branch approach.

  • Large swaths of the military remain unvaccinated as the varying deadlines for each branch approach, per the Washington Post.
  • Some branches have the same vaccination deadline but significant disparities in vaccination progress.
  • A group of service members represented by former Trump lawyer Sidney Powell are suing the Pentagon over the mandate.

Despite looming vaccination deadlines, large swaths of the military remain unvaccinated in the face of the Pentagon’s vaccination mandate, according to data from the Washington Post.

The Pentagon’s vaccination mandate was announced in August, on the heels of President Joe Biden’s announcement that federal employees must be fully vaccinated. Different branches of the military have varying deadlines to reach full vaccination.

While both the active-duty Navy and active-duty Marine Corps must be fully vaccinated by November 28, the Navy stands at 90% fully vaccinated while the Marine Corps is 76.5%, according to the Post.

Active-duty Air Force members are 80.9% fully vaccinated ahead of the November 2 deadline. Active-duty army, with approximately 481,600 members, stands at 81% fully vaccinated ahead of a December 15 deadline.

At least 62 service members have died from COVID, according to data from the Department of Defense.

Sidney Powell – known for being on former President Donald Trump’s legal team as he attempted to overturn the 2020 presidential election results – is representing over a dozen active duty service members who are suing the Pentagon over the mandate, Bloomberg reported. The Department of Defense told Insider it does “not comment on pending litigation.”

Meanwhile, rumors and misinformation have spread regarding the vaccination mandates. Earlier this month, a viral Instagram post suggested that Biden ordered dishonorable discharges for service members who did not get vaccinated, despite the fact that he does not have the authority to make such orders.

Active duty military already has vaccination requirements, such as those for chickenpox, MMR, and Tdap. The coronavirus vaccines are the 18th to be mandated by the defense department, Insider’s Jake Lahut reported.

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Ex-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell said she doesn’t have the ‘tiniest fraction’ to cover $4 billion in lawsuits from her bogus election-fraud claims

sidney powell
Former Trump attorney Sidney Powell in a December 2020 file photo.

  • Ex-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell said she doesn’t have the money to pay for lawsuits against her.
  • She faces over $4 billion in defamation suits after claiming technology firms rigged the election.
  • Powell said this week she “doesn’t have the tiniest fraction of that amount of assets.”

Former Trump lawyer Sidney Powell said she does not have a “fraction” of the funds to cover the looming lawsuits demanding vast sums as a consequence of her bogus claims that last year’s presidential election was rigged.

“We need a take-a-number system now for people who want to sue Sidney Powell who doesn’t have the tiniest fraction of that amount of assets – we could watch that check bounce to infinity and beyond,” she told the Pete Santilli show Wednesday, in a clip cited by The Independent.

Powell pushed multiple, baseless conspiracy theories after the election. They included that election-technology firm Dominion Voting Systems secretly aided a rival firm, Smartmatic, in a bid to steal the election from former President Donald Trump.

Trump fired Powell from his legal team days after she made the allegations in public.

Nonetheless, Powell fronted cases for other plaintiffs, attempting to force a change in the election results in Trump’s favor. All of those lawsuits failed.

Trump campaign officials warned Powell that her claims about Dominion and Smartmatic were false, legal filings would later show, though it did not stop her repeating the claims.

Dominion filed a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against Powell in January, and Smartmatic filed a $2.7 billion defamation lawsuit against Powell and others in February.

Eric Coomer, a Dominion employee who went into hiding following threats from election conspiracy theorists, also filed a defamation lawsuit against Powell, among others. Coomer’s suit did not specify an amount he is seeking.

In her interview Wednesday, Powell said that she would keep fighting the legal cases against her despite her lack of funds.

Powell countersued Dominion Voting Systems in September after she failed to have the suit thrown out, per a Bloomberg report.

In her filing against Dominion, she said the $1.3 billion demand was “ludicrous,” and doubled down on her allegations that Dominion’s election activity contained “serious flaws and wrongdoing.”

Powell is seeking $10 million in damages from Dominion.

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Sidney Powell is on Donald Trump’s ‘no-go list,’ report says. Lawyer unwelcome at his properties and his advisers won’t put through her calls.

Donald Trump and Sidney Powell
Former President Donald Trump’s team distanced itself from Sidney Powell in November 2020.

  • Ex-Trump attorney Sidney Powell is now on the former president’s “no-go list,” according to The Daily Beast.
  • Sources say she’s banned from Trump properties, and advisers have deleted her phone number.
  • Powell is an outcast in Trumpworld as she faces potential disbarment and a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Sidney Powell, the attorney who filed multiple lawsuits to overturn former President Donald Trump’s 2020 election loss, is now an outcast in Trump circles, according to The Daily Beast.

The attorney, who pushed QAnon conspiracy theories and promoted baseless election claims, is reportedly now on Trump’s “no-go list,” and advisers are working to rebuff Powell, sources familiar with the situation told The Daily Beast.

The sources told the media outlet that advisers have put her on an informal list of people to keep away from the former president and added that her phone calls would reportedly be rejected. One Trump lawyer told The Daily Beast that they had recently deleted her phone number.

Powell is also unwelcome at Trump’s properties, including his private clubs and offices, and advisers have been instructed to keep a lookout for her, the media outlet reported.

“Sidney is very much on the no-go list,” one of the sources told The Daily Beast. “Her problems right now do not need to be the [former] president’s problems.”

Powell is facing potential disbarment following a “frivolous” lawsuit seeking to decertify Michigan’s election results.

In August, a federal judge ordered sanctions against her and other lawyers for engaging in litigation practices that were “abusive and, in turn, sanctionable.” The judge formally requested that disciplinary bodies investigate whether she should have her law license revoked, Reuters reported and ordered that she attend classes on the ethical and legal requirements for filing legal claims.

Powell, who baselessly accused Dominion Voting Systems of manipulating the election, is also battling a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit, Insider previously reported.

The Trump team first distanced itself from Powell in November 2020 after she made multiple incorrect statements about the election voting process, The Guardian said.

President Donald Trump told aides in private that he thought attorney Sidney Powell was “crazy” but had still promoted her to his legal team as he challenged some presidential election results, Axios reported.

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Sidney Powell countersues Dominion Voting Systems after failing to get its lawsuit against her tossed in court

Sidney Powell
Attorney Sidney Powell speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election, inside the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, DC, on November 19, 2020.

  • Former Trump attorney Sidney Powell countersued Dominion Voting Systems, per a Bloomberg report.
  • Powell, who accused Dominion of manipulating the election, faces a $1.3 billion defamation suit.
  • The attorney has been unable to get Dominion’s suit tossed and is seeking $10 million in damages.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Sidney Powell, the attorney who filed multiple lawsuits in an effort to overturn former President Donald Trump’s 2020 election loss, on Friday filed a countersuit against the voting-technology company she accused of manipulating the results, according to new court documents.

Powell emerged a key figure in the spread of election conspiracy theories last year, falsely claiming that Dominion Voting Systems tilted the US election to boost now-President Joe Biden.

She also alleged – without evidence – that Dominion secretly aided a rival election-technology company, Smartmatic, and had links to the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

Dominion filed a defamation lawsuit against Powell earlier this year in pursuit of $1.3 billion in damages. Powell has been unable to get the lawsuit tossed in court and subsequently filed her counterclaim against company on Friday.

In her filing against Dominion, Powell called the company’s demand for $1.3 billion “ludicrous,” and said the company’s legal action was “diverting attention from the failings of its election equipment, trying to change the ‘narrative’ that was exposing Dominion’s serious flaws and wrongdoing, and avoiding post-election inquiry into voting irregularities in the 2020 election.”

She is seeking $10 million in damages.

In May, Powell’s lawyers argued that their client was being unfairly targeted among individuals who falsely claimed that Dominion conspired to alter the election results against Trump. Their filing, which was intended to support a motion to dismiss the case, argued that Dominion lacked the standing to sue Powell.

In August, a federal judge denied motions by Powell, former Trump personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, and MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell in seeking to toss defamation lawsuits brought against them by Dominion.

Despite her claims, Powell has so far been unable to validate any of the election theories or irregularities that she claims were prevalent in the 2020 election, and state election officials have roundly dismissed her accusations.

Powell, whom Trump brought on to his legal team during the turbulent post-election period in November 2020, was eventually purged from the campaign team. But just weeks later, The New York Times reported that Trump had invited Powell to the White House to discuss the possibility of her becoming a special counsel investigating voter fraud.

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Former Trump deputy campaign manager David Bossie felt that Sidney Powell was peddling ‘concocted bullshit’ about the 2020 election: book

David Bossie
Donald Trump, left, reacts to the crowd as he shakes hands with co-host David Bossie at the Freedom Summit, Saturday, May 9, 2015, in Greenville, S.C.

  • David Bossie felt that Sidney Powell peddled “concocted bullshit” in challenging the 2020 election, per a new book.
  • As Bossie saw Giuliani and Powell walk into the White House, he panicked, according to the book.
  • Bossie was reportedly set to lead Trump’s election challenge but was sidelined by the coronavirus.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Days after the November election, then-President Donald Trump was continuing to plot a strategy for getting enough votes to secure a second term in the White House, despite the reality that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had just been declared the president-elect.

David Bossie, a former Trump deputy campaign manager in 2016 and an outside advisor, told the president that he had a tough road ahead, according to a new book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, an early copy of which was obtained by Insider.

While Trump was intent on forging ahead with his battle, Bossie knew that the process needed to be done “the right way,” a feeling that was even more pronounced when former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and lawyer Sidney Powell were set to deeply influence the Trump campaign legal strategy, as Woodward and Costa detailed in “Peril.”

During a conversation with Trump, Bossie, who is the president and chairman of the conservative organization Citizens United, stressed that an election fight would require an inordinate amount of work.

“You know, this is going to be hard,” he told the president, according to the book. “We need to do this the right way, methodically, and work hard at it. But we can fight this and win.”

He emphasized: “It’s going to be difficult. It’s going to be an uphill battle.”

When Trump pushed back and asked Bossie whether they should pursue a challenge, Bossie reiterated that fighting “for every legal ballot” would be the mission.

“How do we find the 10,000 votes that we need in Arizona? How do we find the 12,000 that we need in Georgia?” the president asked, according to the book. “What about the military ballots? Are they all in?”

The next day, Trump suggested that Bossie could “keep the trains running” in leading the effort to challenge the election and “let Rudy do Rudy,” according to the book.

However, Bossie would soon test positive for the coronavirus, which effectively sidelined him from the election challenge as he would need to self-quarantine.

“Bossie was angry. He knew Trump was about to give him the reins of the election fight. It would be a huge public role. But he now had to isolate and leave the White House grounds. Those were the rules,” the book said.

From where Bossie was sitting at the Old Executive Office Building just west of the White House, he could see Giuliani and Powell.

Powell had emerged a key figure in the spread of election conspiracy theories, falsely claiming that Dominion Voting Systems tilted the US presidential election to help Biden. She also alleged – without evidence – that Dominion secretly aided a rival election-technology company, Smartmatic, and had links to the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

The voting-machine companies Dominion Voting Systems and Smartmatic have filed defamation lawsuits against Powell over her involvement in spreading the baseless conspiracy theory.

As Bossie saw Giuliani and Powell walk into the White House, he panicked, according to the book.

Bossie thought that Powell peddled “concocted bullshit,” according to the book, but he was now helpless to stop her, as she would soon become part of Trump’s inner election circle, with some added turbulence that would arise.

Giuliani and Powell would later clash spectacularly, with the former mayor, an ardent Trump backer, even questioning some of her most outlandish election theories.

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Election fraud conspiracy theorist Sidney Powell pressed by Australian reporter: ‘Do you ever hear yourself and think it sounds ridiculous?’

Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a rally on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, in Alpharetta, Ga.
Attorney Sidney Powell speaks during a rally on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, in Alpharetta, Ga.

  • Powell is being sued for defamation by Dominion Voting Systems and Smartmatic, another electronic voting systems company.
  • Powell represented Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to making false statements to FBI investigators in 2017.
  • A US judge ruled on August 25 that Powell engaged in “historic and profound abuse” of the legal system.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

During an interview for the Australian Broadcast Company’s two-part series, “Fox and the Big Lie,” Sidney Powell struggled to respond to “basic factual errors” that correspondent Sarah Ferguson pointed out in her claims and threatened to end the interview.

Powell was one of many public figures who propagated former President Donald Trump’s “Big Lie,” a baseless conspiracy that voter fraud cost him the 2020 election. For her involvement in spreading the conspiracy, Powell is being sued for defamation by Dominion Voting Systems and Smartmatic, another electronic voting system company.

At one point during the interview, Powell responded to a line of questioning by asking Ferguson if she works for Smartmatic and stated that she was confused about why Ferguson came to interview her in Highland Park, Texas.

“Because you’ve made a series of very strong allegations against Smartmatic and against Dominion containing many errors of fact,” Ferguson responded.

Shortly after, Powell attempted to stop the interview, saying it was “wholly inappropriate” because of pending litigation.

After reluctantly returning to finish the interview, Powell continued to stick by her baseless claims that widespread election fraud was perpetrated in 2020.

“I am saying that thousands of Americans had some role in [2020 election fraud], knowingly or unknowingly. It was essentially a bloodless coup where they took over the presidency of the United States without a single shot being fired,” Powell said.

After Powell added that the election fraud had been planned for at least three years, Ferguson asked her, “Do you ever hear yourself and think it sounds ridiculous?”

“No, I know myself very well. I’ve been in me a long time. I know my reputation. I know my level of integrity,” Powell replied.

Powell formerly served as a federal prosecutor and represented former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to making false statements to FBI investigators in 2017 and was later pardoned by then-President Donald Trump.

On August 25, a US judge ruled that Powell and L. Lin Wood, another attorney who worked with Powell to sue Michigan election officials, engaged in “historic and profound abuse” of the legal system.

This case “was never about fraud – it was about undermining the People’s faith in our democracy and debasing the judicial process to do so,” the judge wrote.

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Judge rules that Sidney Powell and Lin Wood engaged in ‘historic and profound abuse’ of legal system, approves punishment

sidney powell trump giuliani election
Sidney Powell, an attorney later disavowed by the Trump campaign, participates in a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani at the Republican National Committee headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 19, 2020

  • Sidney Powell and L. Lin Wood failed to present evidence to support their claims of fraud, a judge ruled.
  • Their post-election litigation constituted an abuse of the legal system, the court declared.
  • The attorneys will have to attend at least 12 hours of legal education.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A US judge has ruled that the pro-Trump attorneys who sued Michigan officials over false claims they broke state election law and manipulated the vote will have to pay the defendants’ legal fees and face sanctions over unethical behavior.

The decision stems from a lawsuit filed by the Sidney Powell and L. Lin Wood, among others, following former President Donald Trump’s defeat in the 2020 election. President Joe Biden won Michigan by more than 155,000 votes in what state and national officials described as an election that was “the most secure in American history.”

In a scathing ruling issued on Thursday, US District Judge Linda V. Parker said Powell and Wood had engaged in a “historic and profound abuse of the judicial process.” Their claims – made against Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, the City of Detroit, and state election officials – were not just flimsy and unfounded, alleging a massive and implausible conspiracy to steal the election, Parker said, but actively harmful.

This case “was never about fraud – it was about undermining the People’s faith in our democracy and debasing the judicial process to do so,” the judge wrote.

Thursday’s order grants the defendants’ motion for unspecified sanctions, instructs the attorneys to pay any fees incurred by their litigation, and instructs the lawyers to complete at least 12 hours of legal education within the next six months on election law and pleading standards. The order also refers to them for potentially further disciplinary action, including disbarment.

Parker provided numerous instances of what she termed legal abuse. In one example, the lawyers claimed to have evidence that votes were changed by election workers. Asked for evidence, they presented an affidavit from a woman who said only that “I believe some of these workers were changing votes.” Asked if that woman had actually seen that, “The Court was met with silence.”

In another instance, the judge noted that the lawyers claimed ballots were run through tabulation machine more than once – and that there is no legal reason to do so. “But bafflingly, Plaintiff’s counsel did not offer a cite to the law violated,” the judge wrote. In fact, however, there are a “myriad of reasons” why ballots might be run through a machine several times, such as if the reader is jammed.

The same inability to present evidence presented itself when the lawyers were asked to support the claim that had been an irregular “dump” of votes for Biden. They could not, the court noted, “And speculation, coincidence, and innuendo could never amount to evidence of an ‘illegal vote dump’ – much less, anything else.”

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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From Mike Lindell to OAN, here’s everyone Dominion and Smartmatic are suing over election conspiracy theories so far

Three side-by-side images of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Sidney Powell, and Rudy Giuliani.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Sidney Powell, and Rudy Giuliani are being sued by Dominion.

  • Conspiracy theorists claim Dominion and Smartmatic “flipped” votes from Donald Trump to Joe Biden.
  • The election technology companies are now suing the people who spread those claims.
  • Here’s who’s being sued so far.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Dominion and Smartmatic have launched a series of defamation lawsuits against individuals and groups who spread election fraud conspiracy theories related to their voting machines during the 2020 presidential election.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation suit against Fox News on Friday, and more could be on their way. Dominion has sent cease-and-desist notices and warnings to preserve documents to more than 150 people, and its CEO previously told CNBC that the company was “not ruling anyone out.”

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, people turned to alternative ways to vote in the election, and voter fraud conspiracy theories quickly sprung up.

One posited that Dominion and Smartmatic developed technology that “flipped” votes from Donald Trump to Joe Biden through a method developed with the regime of the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chávez.

The theory has been thoroughly debunked. That didn’t stop pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell and Trump’s former personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani from pushing elements of the theory while filing a series of failed lawsuits seeking to overturn the results of the election. Lindell has also spread misinformation about the machines, saying Dominion “built them to cheat.”

As well as making the brand “radioactive” and putting its multiyear contracts in jeopardy, according to its attorney Tom Clare, the allegations about Dominion also put its employees in danger, the company wrote in a lawsuit.

Its customer support number received a voicemail message saying “we’re bringing back the firing squad,” it wrote in the suit in January. The need for heightened personal security cost Dominion $565,000, according to the lawsuit, bringing its total costs attributed to the vote fraud claims to almost $1.2 million.

Here’s a list of everyone is being sued so far.

Sidney Powell by Dominion and Smartmatic

Sidney Powell
Attorney Sidney Powell at a Trump Campaign press conference.

Dominion was the first to snap.

On January 8, it filed a defamation suit against pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell, seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

Powell was one of the faces of the Trump campaign’s legal team in November, but Trump kicked her off the team after she floated her conspiracy theory at a press conference.

Despite being purged from Trump’s “Elite Strike Force” legal team Powell used her false theories as the premise of four federal lawsuits seeking to overturn the election result. All of them failed, and some have resulted in motions for her to be disbarred.

Dominion’s lawsuit alleges that Powell’s claims caused the company business losses after she baselessly accused the company of fraud, election rigging, and bribery.

“Powell’s statements were calculated to — and did in fact — provoke outrage and cause Dominion enormous harm,” Tom Clare, the attorney representing Dominion, wrote in the lawsuit.

The 124-page defamation lawsuit also outlines how Powell raised money from her media tour peddling her conspiracy theory through a corporate vehicle called “Defending the Republic,” also named as a party in the lawsuit.

Powell responded by tweeting that the lawsuit “is baseless & filed to harass, intimidate, & to drain our resources as we seek the truth of #DominionVotingSystems‘ role in this fraudulent election.”

Smartmatic filed a defamation lawsuit against Powell a month later, suing her at the same time it sued Rudy Giuliani, a fellow conspiracy theorist, and Fox News.

The company claimed that Powell and Giuliani used right-wing media outlets like Fox News to make their conspiracy theories go viral.

“These defendants are primary sources of much of the false information,” the company said. “Their unfounded accusations were repeated by other media outlets, journalists, bloggers and influencers the world over.”

A federal judge Wednesday denied Powell’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Rudy Giuliani by Dominion and Smartmatic

Rudy Giuliani
Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani at a Trump Campaign press conference.

On January 26, Dominion filed a defamation suit against Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s now-former personal lawyer, again seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

In the lawsuit, Dominion accused Giuliani of creating “a viral disinformation campaign about Dominion,” referring to more than 50 of his statements.

Through hearings, television appearances, Twitter, and his own YouTube show, it said, Giuliani repeatedly accused Dominion of election fraud and misrepresented the company’s security measures while doing so.

He “cashed in by hosting a podcast where he exploited election falsehoods to market gold coins, supplements, cigars and protection from ‘cyberthieves,'” Dominion wrote in the lawsuit.

The 107-page document also cited numerous other people who said they believed Giuliani’s claims, which it argued demonstrated the scope of the damage.

“Rudy Giuliani actively propagated disinformation to purposefully mislead voters,” Dominion CEO John Poulos said in a statement. “Because Giuliani and others incessantly repeated the false claims about my company on a range of media platforms, some of our own family and friends are among the Americans who were duped.”

In a statement, Giuliani said he welcomed the lawsuit and suggested he had not previously done a thorough investigation of Dominion’s practices.

A federal judge Wednesday denied Giuliani’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Smartmatic also included Giuliani as a defendant in its lawsuit filed in February.

The company said Giuliani used the conspiracy theories to enrich himself.

“He reportedly would seek thousands of dollars ($20,000/day) in fees from President Trump to spread the story and file frivolous lawsuits,” Smartmatic wrote in its lawsuit.

“He would also use the attention brought to him as one of the primary storytellers to sell various products – from coins to supplements to title fraud protection.”

Mike Lindell by Dominion

mike lindell trump
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

On February 22, Dominion filed a defamation suit against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, also seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

Lindell is a staunch ally of former president Donald Trump and a major GOP donor, who has repeatedly supported Trump’s claims challenging the integrity of the election.

Dominion’s lawsuit accused Lindell of repeatedly making false allegations while knowing there was no credible evidence to support his claims. As well as rallies, interviews, and a two-hour movie, Lindell used his social-media profiles to spread his baseless claims of voter fraud.

In the lawsuit, Dominion claimed Lindell used the claims as a way to ramp up his pillow sales, advertising on far-right media outlets that parroted his claims and sponsoring a bus tour that sought to overturn the election results. Lindell told Insider that retailer boycotts of MyPillow following the insurrection have cost him tens of millions of dollars in business.

He “knowingly lied about Dominion to sell more pillows to people who continued tuning in to hear what they wanted to hear about the election,” Dominion wrote.

Lindell told Insider Dominion had “zero, zero, zero” chance of winning. The lawsuits were part of cancel culture’s attempts at silencing voices, he said.

“I looked at it as a great day for America when they sued me,” Lindell added. “I can put the evidence for the whole world to see, and it’ll be public record, and the media will quit trying to suppress it.”

A federal judge Wednesday denied Lindell’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Fox News by Smartmatic and Dominion

Donald Trump Fox News
A close-up of the Fox News Channel website with a picture of President Donald Trump displayed on a smartphone.

On February 4, Smartmatic filed a $2.7 billion lawsuit against Fox News, accusing it of waging disinformation campaigns about the company’s role in the 2020 election.

“In November and December 2020, Fox News broadcast multiple reports stating and implying that Smartmatic had fixed and rigged the 2020 election,” the company said.

“They repeated the false claims and accusations on air and in articles and social media postings that were together seen by millions in the US and even more around the world.”

Fox called the lawsuit “meritless” and asked a judge to dismiss the case.

On March 26, Dominion also filed a lawsuit against Fox News. The $1.6 billion suit – its biggest yet – claimed that the network gave prominence to the election-fraud claims as a tactic to revive viewership as ratings dropped after President Donald Trump’s loss.

The voting-technology company said that Fox News “sold a false story of election fraud in order to serve its own commercial purposes, severely injuring Dominion in the process.”

In a statement, Fox News said: “Fox News Media is proud of our 2020 election coverage, which stands in the highest tradition of American journalism, and will vigorously defend against this baseless lawsuit in court.”

A Fox News representative told Insider in February that the network ran several “fact-check” segments “prior to any lawsuit chatter.”

While several of its news shows reported that there was no evidence of Dominion’s systems changing votes, Fox News, in particular its opinion hosts, “questioned the results of the election or pushed conspiracy theories about it at least 774 times” in the two weeks after the network called the race, according to Media Matters.

Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, and Lou Dobbs by Smartmatic

Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, Lou Dobbs
Fox News hosts Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, and Lou Dobbs.

Smartmatic’s 285-page lawsuit against Fox News also named the hosts Lou Dobbs, Maria Bartiromo, and Jeanine Pirro as defendants.

Smartmatic said the hosts had offered Powell and Giuliani a platform and endorsed their falsehoods.

Bartiromo, Pirro, and Dobbs all filed separate motions to dismiss the lawsuit.

Fox News canceled Dobbs’ show days after the lawsuit was filed and said he would no longer have a relationship with the network. It added that the move had been planned.

Newsmax by Dominion

Rudy Giuliani on Newsmax.
Newsmax hosted Powell and Giuliani on its shows.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Newsmax, the right-wing outlet owned and run by Trump’s friend Chris Ruddy, on Tuesday.

Newsmax was slow to acknowledge the reality of Biden’s victory in the November 2020 election. Dominion accused Newsmax of promoting falsehoods about the company in order to compete with Fox News, which had correctly recognized Biden’s victory in November.

“Newsmax chose to prioritize its profits over the truth,” the lawsuit said. “For Ruddy and Newsmax, the facts did not matter. What mattered was feeding the audience what it wanted — even if it was spreading false information. And the race to the bottom began in earnest, dragging Dominion down with it.”

After the election, the network also hosted Powell and Giuliani. By allowing them to spout their false theories unchallenged on Newsmax’s programs, this amounted to defamation, Dominion said.

Newsmax representative Brian Peterson told Insider that the media organization was simply reporting on what notable figures said.

“While Newsmax has not reviewed the Dominion filing, in its coverage of the 2020 Presidential elections, Newsmax simply reported on allegations made by well-known public figures, including the President, his advisors and members of Congress — Dominion’s action today is a clear attempt to squelch such reporting and undermine a free press,” Peterson said.

One America News by Dominion

one america news oan
A One America News reported.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against One America News (OAN) Tuesday, accusing it of engaging “in a race to the bottom with Fox and other outlets such as Newsmax to spread false and manufactured stories about election fraud.”

OAN refused to acknowledge Biden’s victory in the 2020 election even as Fox News and Newsmax pulled back on far-fetched election claims and aired videos attesting to the legitimacy of the results.

Dominion said that OAN’s falsehoods contributed toward the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6 and that it defamed Dominion by broadcasting “Absolute Proof,” Lindell’s conspiracy theory-filled documentary about voter fraud.

Dominion also accused OAN hosts Chanel Rion and Christina Bobb of amplifying and spreading false claims about Dominion.

After Dominion threatened to sue OAN for defamation in December, OAN warned Dominion of a countersuit.

Patrick Byrne by Dominion

patrick byrne overstock
Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against former Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne Tuesday.

The lawsuit accuses Byrne, a staunch Trump ally, of waging “a defamatory disinformation campaign against Dominion” in collaboration with Powell, Giuliani, Lindell, and others. This includes pushing election conspiracy theories in television appearances, a blog series, a book, and a film, Dominion said.

“Byrne continues to stick to his manufactured, inherently improbable, profitable, and demonstrable lies,” the lawsuit said.

Dominion is ‘still exploring’ whether to sue Trump over election lies

Trump
Former President Donald Trump.

More lawsuits could be on their way, with Dominion’s CEO telling CNBC in February that the company was “not ruling anyone out” after sending cease-and-desist notices and warnings to preserve documents to more than 150 people.

Asked directly if Dominion would sue Trump, Shackelford, an attorney at Susman Godfrey LLP, told Insider’s Jacob Shamsian Tuesday that the company has not ruled it out.

“We are still exploring options as to how to hold other participants in the campaign of lies against Dominion to account,” Shackelford said.

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Federal judge sanctions lawyers who brought conspiracy theory-filled lawsuit trying to overturn the 2020 election, reap $160 billion in damages

Melania Trump and Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump.

  • A federal judge in Colorado sanctioned two lawyers who challenged the 2020 election results.
  • He called their claims “fantastical” and “the stuff of which violent insurrections are made.”
  • The lawyers had asked for $160 billion in damages because Joe Biden won the presidential election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A federal judge in Colorado has sanctioned attorneys who brought a lawsuit that challenged the results of the 2020 presidential election and sought $160 billion in damages, calling their conspiratorial claims “the stuff of which violent insurrections are made.”

The Wednesday ruling from US Magistrate Judge N. Reid Neureiter concludes that the lawsuit “was filed in bad faith” and orders the attorneys, Ernest J. Walker and Gary D. Fielder, to pay the opposing lawyers’ expenses and fees. The order does not bar them from practicing law.

“This lawsuit was filed with a woeful lack of investigation into the law and (under the circumstances) the facts,” Neureiter wrote. “The lawsuit put into or repeated into the public record highly inflammatory and damaging allegations that could have put individuals’ safety in danger. Doing so without a valid legal basis or serious independent personal investigation into the facts was the height of recklessness.”

The lawsuit was first filed on December 22, more than a month after then-President Donald Trump lost the 2020 election. Though it was filed in Colorado, the lawsuit named as defendants the governors and secretaries of state for swing states which Trump lost to now-President Joe Biden.

The plaintiffs – a smattering of Trump supporters who said in declarations that they believed the election results were rigged, were upset their Facebook posts were deleted, and didn’t want to get vaccinated against COVID-19 – also named Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Priscilla Chan, and Dominion Voting Systems as defendants.

Neureiter’s ruling criticized the attorneys in scathing terms for purporting to “represent 160 million American registered voters,” seeking to nullify “actions of multiple state legislatures, municipalities, and state courts,” and then demand a “nominal amount of $1,000 per registered voter” in damages, which would amount to “a figure is greater than the annual GDP of Hungary.”

“In short, this was no slip-and-fall at the local grocery store,” Neureiter wrote. “Albeit disorganized and fantastical, the Complaint’s allegations are extraordinarily serious and, if accepted as true by large numbers of people, are the stuff of which violent insurrections are made.”

The lawyers’ ‘massive cut-and-paste job’ recycled claims from other failed lawsuits

The judge noted that sanctions were warranted because the attorneys did not bring the lawsuit based on the claims of the people they represented.

“It must also be noted that this was not a client-driven lawsuit. As Plaintiffs’ counsel, Mr. Fielder, conceded at the July 16 hearing, the lawsuit was his idea,” Neureiter wrote. “Mr. Fielder and Mr. Walker were not relying on information from the named Plaintiffs to construct the suit or for any of the substantive factual allegations.”

Neureiter said Walker and Fielder acted improperly by failing to research any factual basis for their claims that the 2020 election results were rigged, and by bringing a claim in Colorado against state officials in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Wisconsin.

Neureiter also criticized the lawyers’ “massive cut-and-paste job.” They recycled claims in their lawsuit from Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and Trump-affiliated lawyer Sidney Powell, both of whom failed in their own lawsuits challenging the election results.

sidney powell georgia
The lawyers recycled claims from Sidney Powell, who led several failed lawsuits seeking to overturn the election results.

The judge also criticized them for uncritically including a false Trump tweet about “Dominion deleting 2.7 million trump votes nationwide.” Neureiter wrote that when asked in a hearing about including the claim, Fielder’s only justification was that Trump was the president.

“Under the circumstances of this case, with this election, with this insurrection, with the on-going threats to election officials and company employees, including in a federal filing as if it were true such an inflammatory and damaging allegation, without any attempt at verification, merely because the out-going President had said it, was reckless and did not represent a reasonable inquiry under the circumstances,” Neureiter wrote.

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