The New York Times is readying a newsletter push

Hi and welcome to Insider Advertising for April 26. I’m senior advertising reporter Lauren Johnson, and here’s what’s going on:

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New York Times building

The New York Times is readying a big newsletter push as Substack tries to poach its top writers with advances worth hundreds of thousands

Read the story.


Apple CEO Tim Cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook.

As Apple gets ready to blow up mobile advertising, this leaked sales deck shows how it was pitching the benefits of personalized ads in 2015

Read the story.


Shopify logo on phone
A Shopify logo displayed on a smartphone in front of a computer.

Shopify is losing nearly half of its C-suite, including key tech leadership. Analysts worry about what it means for its $1 billion plan to take the fight to Amazon.

Read the story.


More stories we’re reading:

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A Shopify seller says she lost about $55,000 after her account was hacked. Now Insider wants to know if there are more people like her.

shopify ipo nyse
  • Shopify seller Andi Rosenberg is missing about $55,000 in sales after her account was hacked.
  • A customer service representative at the company recommended she seek outside legal counsel to resolve the problem.
  • Shopify, which went public in 2015, helps small businesses join the e-commerce boom.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Small business-owner Andi Rosenberg lost tens of thousands of dollars last year when her Shopify account was hacked.

Starting on November 23, 2020, payments from her Shopify sales began being deposited in an unknown bank account without Rosenberg’s knowledge. On her Shopify account, Rosenberg could see the daily sales being paid out. But, her bank account, which she only checks once a month, wasn’t getting any of the payouts.

On December 29, a Shopify support specialist emailed her about “detected suspicious login activity,” and she needed to confirm her bank account and identity. That’s when Rosenberg checked her own bank account and saw she was missing thousands of dollars from her Shopify sales.

She was sick to her stomach, and has been since.

She confirmed her identity and her bank account with Shopify over the course of several days via emails, which were viewed by Insider. The company eventually gave her the payouts from December 30 to January 14, which had been frozen by Shopify until she could confirm her identity and account. The payouts added up to $22,816, based on payment confirmations provided to Insider.

But she was still missing $55,656 in payouts made to the hacker’s bank account for the pay period from November 23 to December 29. She said when the Shopify account was apparently first hacked in November, she never received a notification that her bank information was changed.

“I’m a small business; you could put me out of business,” she said she told customer service on the phone. “It’s just sickening.”

Rosenberg, owner of clothing and jewelry line Hipchik, has sold her products through department stores for years. In 2018, she opened a Shopify account and loved it.

As store sales dwindled, Shopify helped her get through the pandemic, and she had her best year yet online, selling nearly $1 million of merchandise.

Since the missing payments, she says she’s spoken to Shopify’s customer service and the legal team and even reached out to company executives on LinkedIn. In an email seen by Insider, a customer service representative said the legal team could not give Rosenberg advice. The representative added that, “At this point I recommend that you proceed with private legal counsel in order to work towards recovering missing funds, and moving in a productive direction with this investigation.”

She has been in talks with outside lawyers to see if they can help get her payments back, but she’s worried about the legal fees on top of the losses she already incurred.

Insider asked if Shopify knows how frequently sellers’ accounts are hacked, what security measures are in place, and how sellers can get their money back if it’s stolen. “At Shopify, we take the privacy and security of our merchants very seriously,” a spokesperson said. “We go to great lengths to help merchants manage their accounts more securely by providing guidelines and recommendations. We recommend that all merchants enable two-factor authentication to provide a more secure login process and to help prevent unauthorized access to a merchant’s admin.”

The company did not comment on Rosenberg’s case, or answer questions as to why it took several weeks to notice suspicious logins on her account and why the company has not reimbursed her for her lost payments.

Shopify, based in Ottowa, Canada, is an e-commerce company that’s known for helping small business owners attract customers online. Fakespot analyzed Shopify, which went public in 2015, and found that about a fifth of sellers deserved a “caution” or “warning” sign for activities like selling fraudulent products or not delivering items. Shopify told Insider that it has closed thousands of stores, and it regularly implements new measures to address fraud or other violations.

Shopify sellers have also faced fraud from buyers, who order personalized products and then ask for refunds. In 2018, Shopify rolled out a prevention system to protect sellers from these fraudulent buyers, TechCrunch reported.

If you’re a seller and believe you have lost money on Shopify because of a stolen or hacked account, reach out to the reporter of this article, Natasha Dailey at ndailey@businessinsider.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

All the businesses cutting ties with the Trump Organization

trump thanksgiving
Former President Donald Trump.

  • After the insurrection at the Capitol, some entities severed ties with Trump and his business.
  • Several prominent business leaders spoke out against the riot.
  • Deutsche Bank, Aon, Cushman & Wakefield, and even New York City moved to cut ties.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the weeks since early January’s violent insurrection at the Capitol by a pro-Trump mob, some businesses are cutting ties with the Trump Organization.

On January 6, the Capitol went into lockdown as thousands of President Donald Trump’s supporters descended upon the building, resulting in chaos, damage, and violence. At least five people have died.

In the wake of the riot, politicians – including Republican House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy – spoke out about the responsibility that the president bears for inciting violence. Prominent business leaders, including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai, also spoke out against the siege. Business Roundtable released a statement calling on the president to “put an end to the chaos.”

Platforms including Twitter and Facebook moved to ban the president’s accounts. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey broke his silence on the ban last night, saying it set a “dangerous precedent.” And, as Deadline reports, the outgoing president was soon facing expulsion from the performing arts union SAG-AFTRA (although he’d still receive his pension of over $90,000); he resigned instead of accept expulsion.

In a historic vote, Trump became the first president to be impeached by congress twice. If he’s convicted by the senate (a move that requires a two-thirds majority), it can vote on whether to bar him from holding office again.

But some actions have gone beyond statements: Businesses and other entities are severing their financial connections to Trump and the Trump Organization. 

In the wake of the insurrection and impeachment, some groups formerly affiliated with the Trump Organization are opting to sever ties. The Trump Organization did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Here are all the businesses and entities that have publicly split from the Trump Organization.

SAG-AFTRA planned on holding a hearing on whether to expel Donald Trump from the labor group – but he resigned in a pointed letter.

Trump The Apprentice

On February 4, Trump sent in a resignation letter addressed to SAG-AFTRA union President Gabrielle Carteris.

“I write to you today regarding the so-called Disciplinary Committee hearing aimed at revoking my union membership,” Trump wrote.”Who cares!”

He went on to say he was “not familiar with your work” but that he’s proud of his own performances in movies such as “Home Alone 2” and “Zoolander” and television shows including “Saturday Night Live” and “The Apprentice.”

He closed his letter with: “I no longer wish to be associated with your union. As such, this letter is to inform you of my immediate resignation from SAG-AFTRA. You have done nothing for me.”

In response, SAG-AFTRA released a two-word statement: “Thank you.”

New York City is ending its contracts with the Trump Organization.

donald trump and fred trump
Donald and Fred Trump at the opening of the Wollman Rink on November 6, 1987.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Wednesday that New York City “will no longer have anything to do with the Trump Organization.”

Insider’s Grace Dean reported that the city had contracts with the Trump Organization to run two ice-skating rinks (and a carousel) in Central Park, as well as a golf course in the Bronx.

The Washington Post reported those contracts brought in $17 million in annual revenue for the Trump Organization.

The PGA pulled its 2022 championship from Trump’s Bedminster, New Jersey, golf club.

trump golfing
Trump at the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia, on November 21.

Insider’s Julie Gerstein reported the decision came after last week’s insurrection; board members voted to pull the plug. 

In a statement to The Washington Post, the Trump Organization said it was “a breach of a binding contract and they have no right to terminate the agreement.”

Trump was more upset about no longer hosting the tournament than getting impeached for a second time, The New York Times’ Maggie Haberman reported.

Deutsche Bank and Signature Bank are reportedly ending their banking services for the Trump Organization.

Deutsche Bank
Germany’s Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt.

Bloomberg reported on Monday that both banks were severing ties. In a statement to Bloomberg, Signature said, “We believe the appropriate action would be the resignation of the president of the United States.”

According to the Bloomberg report, Trump owes Deutsche Bank over $300 million, and Signature Bank will close two personal accounts with about $5.3 million in them.

Professional Bank won’t provide services for Trump or the Trump Organization.

trump wind
Trump borrowed $11 million from the bank in May 2018.

“Professional Bank has decided not to engage in any further business with the Trump Organization and its affiliates, and will be winding down the relationship effective immediately,” the bank said in a statement to Bloomberg on Tuesday.

Bloomberg reported Trump borrowed $11 million from the bank in May 2018 to buy a home for his sister Maryanne Trump Barry next to his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida.

Insider’s Kate Duffy reported Trump had a money-market account with the bank worth as much as $25 million.

The Girl Scouts want to end their lease in a Trump building.

Trump Building
The Trump Building.

The Girl Scouts’ New York chapter told Insider’s Daniel Geiger that the organization was trying to get out of a 15-year lease at 40 Wall St., which is known as the Trump Building.

The real-estate giant Cushman & Wakefield will no longer do business with the Trump Organization.

trump tower
A guard outside Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan on August 24, 2018.

The firm was an agent for Trump Tower and 40 Wall St.

“Cushman & Wakefield has made the decision to no longer do business with The Trump Organization,” a spokesman said in a statement to Insider.

Curbed reported last week that the real-estate brokerage JLL was no longer involved in marketing the Trump hotel in Washington, though it’s not clear when the brokerage backed out.

Shopify closed the Trump Organization’s store.

Shopify app phone
The Shopify app.

Vox reported on January 7 that Shopify closed both the Trump Organization’s store and the e-commerce section of Trump’s election website.

The insurance brokerage Aon has ended its relationship with the Trump Organization.

michael cohen donald trump regular
The insurer was subpoenaed in 2019 after Michael Cohen said Trump inflated the value of his assets.

Bloomberg first reported on Wednesday the insurer had cut ties with the Trump Organization. 

Aon was subpoenaed in 2019 by New York’s financial regulator over Michael Cohen’s allegation that Trump had inflated the value of his assets.

Read the original article on Business Insider

All the actions big tech companies have taken against Trump’s social media accounts following the US Capitol siege

US Capitol siege
The rioters during the Capitol siege.

  • The US Capitol siege by pro-President Donald Trump rioters on Wednesday has set off a wave of actions from big tech companies.
  • Platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter have removed a video of Trump telling rioters “we love you, you’re very special” but “go home in peace.”  
  • Twitter and Facebook have both locked Trump’s respective social media accounts. 
  • Here’s a list of all the actions big tech companies have taken against Trump in response to the Capitol seige.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The US Capitol siege by President Donald Trump supporters on Wednesday has set off a range of responses and actions from big tech companies, including deleting the infamous Trump response video and temporarily freezing Trump’s social media accounts.

Prior to the historic Capitol siege that left four people dead, according to CBS News, and the Capitol building ransacked, the biggest action tech companies like Facebook and Twitter took to moderate Trump was to add fact-checking lines on some of his baseless claims regarding topics like mail-in ballot fraud.

Read more: The siege of the US Capitol was a disaster for congressional cybersecurity – and experts say Congress will likely have to wipe all its computers and rebuild from scratch

However, following the riots, more big tech platforms have taken serious and actionable steps towards temporarily quieting Trump, although people calling to ban the president from social media platforms say these short-term freezes may not be enough.

See all of the actions various companies have taken in response to the Capitol siege:

YouTube

YouTube
YouTube.

YouTube has removed a video of Trump disputing the 2020 presidential election results while telling rioters “we love you, you’re very special” but “go home in peace.” 

Farshad Shadloo, YouTube spokesperson, told Insider in an email on Wednesday that the video violated YouTube’s policies surrounding “content that alleges widespread fraud or errors changed the outcome of the 2020 US.”

“We do allow copies of this video if uploaded with additional context and sufficient educational, documentary, scientific, or artistic (EDSA) value,” Shadloo continued.

Read more: A pro-Trump super PAC made illegal contributions to the president’s reelection campaign, a watchdog group says

Following this removal, on Thursday, YouTube announced it would give channels a “strike” if its videos violated the social media platform’s policies. Following the first strike, a channel will be banned from posting for a week. A second strike within 90 days will result in a two-week ban. The third and final strike, if done within 90 days, will result in a permanent ban. 

The strike policy announcement came out of the “disturbing events that transpired yesterday,” a YouTube spokesperson told Insider.

Facebook

Facebook headquarters
Facebook.

The same Trump video that YouTube removed was also removed by Facebook on Wednesday. According to a tweet by Guy Rosen, Facebook’s vice president of integrity, the video removal decision was made “because on balance we believe it contributes to rather than diminishes the risk of ongoing violence.”

On Thursday, Facebook went one step further and decided to freeze Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts “indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete,” Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO, wrote in a post.

“His decision to use his platform to condone rather than condemn the actions of his supporters at the Capitol building has rightly disturbed people in the US and around the world,” Zuckerberg wrote. “We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great.”

Snapchat

snapchat
Snap.

Snapchat has also “locked” Trump’s account following the Capitol siege, a Snap spokesperson told Insider on Thursday

This isn’t the first action Snap has taken against Trump. In June, the social media platform stopped promoting Trump’s account in its Discover section after he called for violence against protestors amid demonstrations following George Floyd’s death.

“We will not amplify voices who incite racial violence and injustice by giving them free promotion on Discover,” a Snap spokesperson told Insider in June. “Racial violence and injustice have no place in our society and we stand together with all who seek peace, love, equality, and justice in America.”

Shopify

Shopify app phone
Shopify.

On Thursday, Shopify removed stores with ties to Trump, including shop.donaldjtrump.com and trumpstore.com.

Read more: Biden has been certified as president. 5 experts predict how his administration could crackdown on the advertising and tech industries.

Shopify does not tolerate actions that incite violence,” a Shopify spokesperson said in a statement to Insider on Thursday. “Based on recent events, we have determined that the actions by President Donald J. Trump violate our Acceptable Use Policy, which prohibits promotion or support of organizations, platforms or people that threaten or condone violence to further a cause. As a result, we have terminated stores affiliated with President Trump.”

Twitch 

twitch logo
Twitch.

Twitch has also frozen Trump’s account, and will make further decisions about his account after Biden is inaugurated, The Verge reported.

Previously, Twitch placed a temporary two-week ban on Trump’s account due to “hateful conduct” policy violations, a Twitch spokesperson told Insider in June.

Twitter 

trump twitter
Twitter.

On Wednesday, Twitter removed the same one-minute video that YouTube and Facebook dismissed. Shortly after, the social media platform locked Trump’s Twitter account and removed three tweets – including one with the aforementioned video – and replaced the posts with “this Tweet is no longer available” messages. As a result, Trump could either delete the tweets to gain access to his account after 12 hours or remain frozen out of his Twitter account.

On Thursday, Trump deleted the three tweets in question, and the tweets now read: “This Tweet is no longer available because it violated the Twitter Rules.” Twitter did not confirm with Insider the time the tweets were deleted, but if the original statement still holds, the 12-hour countdown until Trump has access to his Twitter account has already begun.

However, the social media platform isn’t ruling out more serious actions in the future.

“Future violations of the Twitter Rules, including our Civic Integrity or Violent Threats policies, will result in permanent suspension of the @realDonaldTrump account,” Twitter said in a statement. 

Read the original article on Business Insider