Memphis police have reportedly arrested 2 customers who started a shooting in a Burger King because their chicken sandwich had too much hot sauce

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A Burger King in Los Angeles.

  • Police say they arrested customers who started a shooting in a Memphis Burger King, FOX13 reported.
  • The uncle of a witness told FOX13 that one suspect said her chicken sandwich had too much hot sauce.
  • Police records seen by the outlet say that two people were hit by the gunfire.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Police in Memphis say they have arrested two customers for starting a shooting in a Burger King restaurant after being served a chicken sandwich with too much hot sauce, FOX13 reported.

Two people were hit by the gunfire, the outlet reported, citing police records.

An affidavit shows police received a call to a Burger King in the Hollywood area of Memphis on June 6, FOX13 reported.

A female passenger, later identified as 20-year-old Keonna Halliburton, in a car had an “altercation” with staff over a spicy chicken sandwich per the affidavit, the publication reported.

Read more: Celebs like Jennifer Aniston, Scarlett Johansson, and Martha Stewart are landing C-suite gigs at white-hot companies like HumanCo and Vital Proteins as startups create hybrid influencer-exec roles

After the altercation, Halliburton left the store in a car with driver Tavarus Mckinney, 22, FOX13 reported, citing records.

They then returned in a car and fired multiple shots from the road into the parking lot at four people, the publication reported, citing the affidavit. Two were hit by the gunfire, it said.

Halliburton and Mckinney were charged with four counts of attempted first-degree murder and four counts of employment of a firearm during the commission of a felony, FOX13 said.

The outlet spoke to an uncle of one of the people Halliburton and Mckinney shot at, who said that his niece had told him that Halliburton complained that her chicken sandwich had too much hot sauce on it.

It is the latest in a series of violent incidents taking place at food and drink chains. On Sunday, a Florida man was accused of pulling a gun on a Starbucks employee, who turned out to be the local police chief’s daughter, over not having cream cheese for his bagel.

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The gunman in the FedEx mass shooting was able to buy 2 rifles after police took away his shotgun last year

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Law enforcement confer at the scene, Friday, April 16, 2021, in Indianapolis, where multiple people were shot at a FedEx Ground facility near the Indianapolis airport.

The gunman in the Indianapolis FedEx shooting legally bought two rifles after police had taken away his shotgun in March 2020, The New York Times reported.

Police said Brandon Hole, 19, who shot and killed eight people at an Indianapolis FedEx facility on Thursday, legally purchased the firearms a couple of months after his shotgun was confiscated because his mother called and voiced worry over his mental state.

Hole purchased two assault-style rifles that were used in the FedEx shooting in July and September of last year.

In March of last year, Hole’s mother warned the FBI about him.

“The suspect’s mother contacted law enforcement to report he might try to commit ‘suicide by cop,'” special agent Paul Keenan of the FBI’s Indianapolis field office said. This situation is when an individual will provoke law enforcement to shoot them to defend themselves or civilians.

The FBI interviewed him a month later in April 2020. Keenan said they did not find that Hole possessed “Racially Motivated Violent Extremism (RMVE) ideology.”

However, despite his mom’s warning and the confiscation of his shotgun, he was deemed to be subject to the state’s red flag law, where a judge determines if someone is a dangerous risk and bars them from being able to own a firearm.

Authorities would have two weeks after confiscating someone’s gun to present a case to a judge on whether or not that person should be able to have a gun for any period of time. If a judge were to rule that someone was unfit to own guns, the seizure would stand only for up to a year.

Indianapolis Police Chief Randal Taylor told The Times he wasn’t sure if that sort of hearing even took place last year but police never gave him back the gun they took away.

Taylor added the purchases of the two rifles would have only been possible if no red flag was made. It’s unclear if a judge ever ruled on a red flag case against Hole or if prosecutors even presented a case, The Times reported.

Hole was a former employee of the FedEx location but no motive for the shooting has been determined.

Police on Friday identified the victims as 32-year-old Matthew R. Alexander, 19-year-old Samaria Blackwell, 66-year-old Amarjeet Johal, 64-year-old Jaswinder Kaur, 68-year-old Jaswinder Singh, 48-year-old Amarjit Sekhon, 19-year-old Karlie Smith, and 74-year-old John Weisert. At least four of the victims were members of the Sikh community.

Several others were injured.

On Saturday, Hole’s family issued an apology to the victims and told The IndyStar they tried to get him help.

“We are devastated at the loss of life caused as a result of Brandon’s actions; through the love of his family, we tried to get him the help he needed,” the statement reads. “Our sincerest and most heartfelt apologies go out to the victims of this senseless tragedy. We are so sorry for the pain and hurt being felt by their families and the entire Indianapolis community.”

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A ‘gunfight’ at a Wilmington, North Carolina, house party shooting left 3 dead and 4 injured, police say

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  • Three people were killed and four injured after a shooting at a North Carolina house party.
  • Wilmington Police said officers responded early Saturday to the scene where “a gunfight had erupted.”
  • The shooting follows a violent month in the US.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Three people died and four were injured after a shooting at a house party early Saturday morning in Wilmington, North Carolina.

According to a series of tweets and a post on the Wilmington Police Department’s Facebook page, officers responded to a call that shots were being fired. After arriving at the location just after midnight, officers found “a gunfight had erupted inside the house during a house party.”

The department did not immediately identify a motive or publicly named the victims.

“Our hearts go out to all affected by this senseless violence, and we ask that anyone with information surrounding this incident please come forward so that we may find justice,” the post said.

“In my more than two decades as a prosecutor this is one of the worst crimes we have ever had in the Port City,” New Hanover District Attorney Ben David told Wilmington’s WECT 6. “The community’s unimaginable grief must be met with an equal commitment to get justice for all of the victims in this case.”

The news follows a violent few weeks involving several mass shootings in the US. A gunman killed eight people at three Atlanta spas on March 16. On March 22, another gunman killed 10 people at a Boulder, Colorado grocery store.

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Boulder shooting victims include 3 employees at the King Soopers grocery store and an Instacart shopper

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Three King Soopers employees died in a deadly shooting.

Three King Soopers grocery store workers and an Instacart worker were among the 10 people killed in a shooting in Boulder, Colorado on Monday.

Police released the victims’ names on Tuesday morning. Among them are three people who worked at the store: Denny Stong, 20, Rikki Olds, 25, and Teri Leiker, 51.

Leiker had worked at King Soopers for roughly 30 years, with her friend Lexi Knutson telling Reuters that Leiker loved working at the grocery store.

“She loved going to work and enjoyed everything about being there,” Knutson told Reuters. “Her boyfriend and her had been good friends and began dating in the fall of 2019. He was working yesterday too. He is alive.”

Olds was a front-end manager at King Soopers, The Denver Post reports. Stong’s profile picture on Facebook was framed with the words: “I can’t stay home, I’m a Grocery Store Worker.”

A representative for Kroger, the parent company of King Soopers, said in a statement to Insider that the company is “horrified and deeply saddened by the senseless violence that occurred at our King Soopers store.”

“The entire Kroger family offers our thoughts, prayers and support to our associates, customers, and the first responders who so bravely responded to this tragic situation,” the statement continued. “We will continue to cooperate with local law enforcement and our store will remain closed during the police investigation.”

Read more: Workers file new sexual-harassment complaints against McDonald’s

Lynn Murray, 62, was shot while visiting the King Soopers as an Instacart shopper. Her husband, John Mackenzie, told The New York Times she had enjoyed working for Instacart after retiring from her career as a photo director.

“She was an amazing woman, probably the kindest person I’ve ever known,” Mackenzie told The Times. “Our lives are ruined, our tomorrows are forever filled with a sorrow that is unimaginable.”

“Violence of any kind has no place in our society,” Instacart founder and CEO Apoorva Mehta said in a social media post on Tuesday. “Our teams are working with law enforcement and the King Soopers team to assist in any way we can. We’ve reached out to the shopper’s family to offer our support & resources during this unimaginably difficult time.”

Mehta added: “For those members of our community who were shopping in the Boulder area, we’re also ensuring they’re able to take the time they need to grieve and recover from yesterday’s tragic events.”

The shooting serves as a stark reminder of the risks that retail workers face on the job.

“For the last year our members and other associates have fought an invisible enemy, COVID-19, but today several innocent souls were killed by an evil human,” Kim Cordova, the president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 7, the union that represents employees at the King Soopers store, said in a statement.

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Police ignored the role of race and gender in the Georgia shootings. Here’s what Asian advocates in Atlanta are saying about it

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Lijing Zhao lays a bouquet of flowers outside a spa where four people were shot and killed on March 17, 202. in Acworth, Georgia.

  • Georgia activists have mobilized to help the families of six Asian women killed on March 16.
  • The attack has forced a conversation over misogyny and hypersexualization directed at Asian women.
  • Georgia officials came under fire for accepting the alleged shooter’s narrative of the attack.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

E. Lim had little time to process the brutal attack that claimed the lives of six Asian women and two others at three Metro-Atlanta spas.

As the organizing and civic engagement director for Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Atlanta, Lim-like many of their colleagues-was in response mode. Atlanta born and raised and a local organizer since 2015, Lim told Insider their initial reaction was to detach from the killings.

“I’ve had to dissociate so hard, because I know people in similar situations,” said Lim referring to the common experience of sexual harassment and sexual assault in the workplace.

The horrific violence that unfolded on Tuesday night in Atlanta has forced a national conversation over the long history of anti-Asian violence and discrimination, as well as the misogyny and hypersexualization directed at Asian women in this country.

The official narrative of what happened, which seemed to accept the explanation given by the assailant, has also galvanized Asian-American activists and organizers in Georgia to turn this into a teachable moment.

“It is racialized,” said Lim. “When you talk about ‘massage parlors’ and then talk about how sex work might be involved, you’re talking about race.”

A statement condemning systemic racism and gender-based violence had 180 signatories from state and national organizations, said Stephanie Cho, director of the AAAJ-Atlanta. The group is fundraising to support the families of those killed.

“White supremacy is literally killing us,” said Cho. “Asian American communities have been under the radar on this issue, but honestly, this is a time for us to really come together, be in solidarity, and really have those tough conversations community conversations around policy.

“YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT RACE”

Beginning at around 5pm on Tuesday night, a gunman attacked a massage parlor north of Atlanta, and then two other massage parlors in metro Atlanta, killing six Asian women and two others.

The Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department identified the four people killed at Young’s Asian Massage as Delaina Ashley Yaun, 33; Paul Andre Michels, 54; Xiaojie Tan, 49; and Daoyou Feng, 44. Elcias R. Hernandez-Ortiz, 30, was also injured in the shooting. As of Thursday morning, the Atlanta Police Department had not released the names of the four people killed at the two spas in Atlanta.Sent from my iPhone

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Flowers were left at one of the spas targeted in the March 16 attack.

Around 6% of the population in metro Atlanta identifies as Asian, according to Atlanta Regional Commission’s 2020 estimates. Cherokee County, where the first attack occurred, is around 2% Asian.

Almost immediately, the narrative of what had happened put forward by Georgia officials downplayed a “racial motivation” for the killings and relied on what the alleged killer had told police. Jay Baker, the spokesman for the Cherokee County Sheriff, said at a news conference that the suspect had had “a really bad day,” was “kind of at the end of his rope,” and had told police that he considers himself a “sex addict.”

But community leaders in Atlanta had a clear message: The racism and misogyny impacting Asian women must not be ignored. And even if sex work was involved, the lives of these women were no less valuable than any other.

The killings also hit home hard for Wei Jia, a local organizer, who lives about a mile from one of the spas. Echoing others, Jia told Insider that the focus on whether the perpetrator was a sex addict fit into an old trope of a Jack the Ripper like character with no real interrogation of history.

“The sheriff sympathizing with the gunman, like saying that he just had a ‘bad day’ speaks volumes,” said Jia. “He didn’t mention anything about the women that were killed. Didn’t mention anything about their families, about their lives.”

Jia pointed to the long history of dehumanizing and sexualizing Asian women: Prior to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, The United States banned the immigration of Chinese Women in the Page Act of 1875 under the guise of preventing sex work.

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A woman places a sign of solidarity outside a spa where four people were killed on March 17, 2021 in Acworth, Georgia.

“That a white male murdered Asian women in the United States is part of a very long history of white supremacist violence against anybody who wasn’t white,” Jia said.

Blaming an alleged sexual addiction as the motive in the killing of six Asian women and two others is itself racist, while taking the perpetrator at his word further victimized the victims and denied them their humanity, said Bentley Hudgins, a queer organizer based in Atlanta. “They’re so ready to distance themselves from calling this racist and misogyny and trying to downplay this as just like a white incel who was mad he didn’t get off that they’re missing the point entirely,” Hudgins said in an interview.

Hudgins and Jia’s comment came just hours before Buzzfeed News reported that Baker, the sheriff’s department spokesperson, posted racist anti-Asian shirts on Facebook last April that blamed China for the Covid-19 pandemic.

According to the Stop AAPI Hate reporting center, which tracks xenophobic hate against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, 3,795 incidents have been reported between last March 19 and Feb. 28 of this year. Close to 70% of the incidents were against women. In a recent survey, NAPAWF found that nearly half of Asian American and Pacific Islander women have been affected by anti-Asian racism in the past two years.

THROUGH TRAGEDY, A TEACHABLE MOMENT

Community advocates in Atlanta say they are prioritizing support for the victims’ families and the community at large, and they explained those efforts at a press conference on Wednesday.

“Much of our focus is back towards the victims and their families and really what our communities need,” Aisha Yaqoob Mahmood, executive director of the Asian American Advocacy Fund adding that legal services, mental health, and language support were needed.

Instead of allowing a sympathetic narrative toward the perpetrator to dominate coverage, attention should focus on reporting stories from the community and about how this attack impacted the community, she said. “We continue to bring the focus back to who are the most vulnerable in our communities, and working towards making sure that we can provide safety and security for us all.”

The intersection of race, gender, and class colors the response and underlying assumption made about the worth of those killed, the organizers said, while the killing of six women in the course of their work also underscores the vulnerability of those in low-wage jobs.

“This is a gender and race based violence that happened to our community,” said Leng Leng Chancey, Executive Director for 9to5, an organization focused on increasing economic security as well as political power and participation of working women.

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Julie Tran holds her phone during a candlelight vigil for the Atlanta victims held in Garden Grove, California.

She pointed to the challenges of dealing with sexual harassment and assault along with other institutional barriers. “Low-wage workers already faced multiple hurdles and systemic racism every day,” Chancey said. “I mean, who can you really report this to?”

Organizers said the events of this week, horrific as they were, can serve as teachable moments for how to discuss and cover violent attacks on marginalized communities, and the importance of listening to individuals from those communities.

Shortly after the attacks, the Asian American Journalists Association issued a guidance saying the use of “massage parlor” as a descriptor to describe the business establishments is outdated and reinforces negative stereotypes that hypersexualize and dehumanize Asian women.

The guidance also stressed the need to study the context within which Asian communities are experiencing and receiving this latest news, while acknowledging the diversity within the “Asian community.”

“The media needs to understand that the Asian community is not a monolith,” Sarah Park, the president of the Atlanta chapter of the Korean American Coalition, said at Wednesday’s press conference.

“We speak over hundreds of different languages. We practice different cultural religions, we are all different individuals.”

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