Sarah Palin says she has ‘bizarre’ COVID-19 symptoms and urges Americans to wear masks

Sarah Palin
Sarah Palin speaks during her appearance at Politicon at Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, California on June 26, 2016.

  • Sarah Palin, the 2008 GOP vice-presidential nominee, announced she and two of her children contracted COVID-19.
  • Palin urged Americans to wear masks, calling it “better than doing nothing to slow the spread” of the virus.
  • A host of mostly Republican-led states have lifted their statewide pandemic restrictions, including mask mandates.
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Sarah Palin, the 2008 GOP vice-presidential nominee, announced on Wednesday that she had been infected with COVID-19 and urged Americans to wear masks, breaking from many of her Republican allies.

“Through it all, I view wearing that cumbersome mask indoors in a crowd as not only allowing the newfound luxury of being incognito, but trust it’s better than doing nothing to slow the spread,” Palin, 57, told People Magazine.

This comes just a few months after Palin campaigned for the Republican party in Georgia alongside Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, an anti-masker and QAnon promoter, and spread the GOP lie that the 2020 presidential election was “rigged.”

The former governor of Alaska said she tested positive after one of her daughters and her 12-year-old son Trig, who has Down syndrome, were both infected. She said she experienced “bizarre” symptoms, including loss of taste and smell, and warned COVID-19 can “really knock you down.” People Magazine said that these were recent diagnoses but it’s unclear when exactly they fell ill.

“I strongly encourage everyone to use common sense to avoid spreading this and every other virus out there,” she said, adding that her case shows “anyone can catch this.”

After making headlines last year for her performance on Fox’s “Masked Singer,” Palin joked, “History will show we Masked Singer visitors were masked before being masked was cool.”

A host of mostly Republican-led states have lifted their statewide pandemic restrictions, including mask mandates, which experts say is helping fuel an uptick in COVID-19 cases. President Joe Biden has repeatedly called on GOP governors to reinstate their mask mandates and slow the reopening of their states.

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Sarah Palin filmed a YouTube video calling for Julian Assange to be pardoned, despite being previously targeted by WikiLeaks

Sarah Palin
Sarah Palin speaks during her appearance at Politicon at Pasadena Convention Center.

  • Sarah Palin, who herself was a victim of WikiLeaks, has called for founder Julian Assange to be pardoned in a YouTube video.
  • The former governor of Alaska said the WikiLeaks founder “deserves a pardon, he deserves all of us to understand more about what he has done in the name of real journalism.”
  • In 2008, Wikileaks posted family photos, private messages and government emails from Palin’s Yahoo account. 
  • At the time, Palin questioned why he had not been pursued with the same urgency as Al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders but later apologized in a Facebook post in 2017.
  • Assange was arrested in April 2019 after seeking asylum at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for over six years and is facing a potential extradition to the US. 
  • Trump is said to be considering pardoning him, calls for which have intensified ahead of Biden being sworn in as president, since he has previously referred to Assange as a “high-tech terrorist.”
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Sarah Palin, who was herself a victim of WikiLeaks, has called for Julian Assange to be pardoned in a YouTube video posted yesterday.

The former governor of Alaska begins the video asking for the pardoning of the WikiLeaks founder with: “I am the first one to admit when I make a mistake and I admit that I made a mistake some years ago, not supporting Julian Assange, thinking that he was a bad guy… that he leaked material and I’ve learned a lot since then.”

She said she believed that Julian did the world a favor by fighting for what he believed was right and “what was ultimately proven to be right.”

She added that he deserved a pardon and “all of us to understand more about what he has done in the name of real journalism and that’s getting to the bottom of issues that the public really needs to hear about and benefit from.”

In 2008, Wikileaks posted family photos, private messages, and government emails from Palin’s Yahoo account, weeks after John McCain named her his vice-presidential running mate.

At the time, Palin questioned why he had not been pursued with the same urgency as Al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders.

However in 2017, she apologized in a Facebook post that read: “This important information that finally opened people’s eyes to democrat candidates and operatives would not have been exposed were it not for Julian Assange.” It closed: “Julian, I apologize.”

In Saturday’s YouTube video, Palin continued: “Some years ago I publicly spoke out against Julian and I made a mistake. I want more Americans to speak out on his behalf and to understand what it is that he has done, what has been done to him as he has been working on the people’s behalf to allow information to get to us so we could make up our minds about different issues of different people.

“He did the right thing and I support him. And I hope that more and more people, especially as it comes down to the wire, will speak up in support of pardoning Julian. God bless him,” she ends with.

Assange was arrested in April 2019 after seeking asylum at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for more than six years. He is facing a potential extradition to the US, where he would face conspiracy and espionage charges, which carry a sentence of up to 175 years.

Trump is said to be considering pardoning him, calls for which have recently intensified ahead of Joe Biden being sworn in as president, since he has previously referred to Assange as a “high-tech terrorist.”

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