How this couple went from traveling the US in a camper van to selling camper van conversions on Instagram for up to $90,000

Louis the Van
Louis the Van’s Louis build.

  • Two months after Seth and Scarlett Eskelund began #VanLife full-time, the US shut down.
  • The couple headed back home and started their own camper van conversion company aided by social media.
  • This business affords them the flexibility needed to go back into van life once the pandemic is over.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Many of us remember exactly where we were when we first realized COVID-19 was about to jarringly disrupt our lives.

For Seth and Scarlett Eskelund, the realization hit when they were in Sedona, Arizona, a 29-hour drive from home on the East Coast. The couple had just begun their full-time #VanLife journey two months prior, a goal they had been working towards since early 2019 when they first purchased a used van to turn into their own tiny home on wheels.

“It was pretty devastating for both of us,” Seth Eskelund told Insider in an interview. “It was a long time in the [car ride back home] to sit and think about it and go down Interstate 40 essentially the wrong way for what we had prepared for.”

levii the van 1
Louis the Van’s Levii build.

However, a glimmer of hope came out of this disappointment. Along the drive back home, the couple decided to pursue their plans of buying another used van to convert into a camper, an idea they had already been toying around with.

“We wanted something that would keep us connected to the van life community,” Scarlett Eskelund told Insider in an interview. “We knew we wanted this in the long run. We figured we’d do something that kept us connected to the community as a whole.”

This decision then turned into Roah (pictured below), the couple’s first camper van conversion after returning home during COVID-19. The moment they completed and sold the van, the duo returned to the road and began heading up to Canada for the summer.

Louis the Van's Roah build camper van
Louis the Van’s Roah build.

But as we all know now, the Canadian border closed, and the couple was again forced to return home. That was when they decided to convert another van, this time out of leased warehouse space. And as the cliche goes, the rest is history, and the couple has now built five vans, including the personal camper that’s been with them since the start of their van life journey.

“We joke that we’re just continually forced into this in the best way possible,” Scarlett Eskelund said.

Converting and selling vans is a necessity

QUIN the van 1
Louis the Van’s Quin build.

“If we don’t sell these vans, it’s over, not just for the business, but … we would have no money to get back out on the road and travel,” Scarlett Eskelund said. “Luckily I don’t think either of us harped on that too much, because I think if we did, we definitely wouldn’t have gotten into this.”

The pair’s 12 to 18-hour workdays grant them a rapid turnaround time. The first van they built in the warehouse, pictured below, was completed in 20 days – partially because the couple needed the financial support – and sold in three weeks.

QUIN 2
Louis the Van’s Quin build.

Ironically, that van was the longest it has ever taken the couple to sell a finished van. Their “list-to-sell” time normally sits at around two to three weeks, which Seth Eskelund says is “pretty quick.”

Relying on public interest after a van has been completed – instead of doing custom builds – may seem risky. But so far, this business decision has paid off with the help of the couple’s YouTube and Instagram presence, which have almost 70,000 subscribers and 21,000 followers, respectively. All of the couple’s buyers have found their vans through Instagram, where the Eskelund’s will do daily check-ins on their in-progress vans.

Within two to three weeks after a camper van sells, the pair will have another used van in the garage, ready to convert again.

Their pricing methods aren’t an industry-standard, but that’s the point

levii the van 2
Louis the Van’s Levii build.

The Eskelund’s camper vans have been a hit with customers because of their prices, according to the couple. Their tiny homes on wheels can range from a weekend warrior van to a built-out unit with a shower and toilet. But no matter the amenities, the couple aims to price “very fairly” and below the current market rate, which can often run high.

Camper van conversion companies and RV makers have seen a boom in sales as more people have turned to road travel during COVID-19. But as a result, the camper van market has been price gouging, sometimes to the tune of an additional $60,000 to $70,000 compared to 2019 prices, according to Seth Eskelund. But when pricing their own vans, the couple doesn’t want to take this route, and instead opts for a price tag that’s less than the general market.

From the start, the couple’s goal was to convert vans to give them something to focus on during the coronavirus pandemic. The point was never to become wealthy from the business: instead, they wanted to break even or just make a small income.

“It’s a lot more than just a business and money for us,” Seth Eskelund said. “I would say we are as personally invested in the vans as we are in the business, and maybe that’s not smart from a business perspective on us, but that is who we are.”

QUIN the van
Louis the Van’s Quin build.

The pair factors in several aspects when pricing the van, including its mileage, the cost of purchasing the initial used van, and build specifications. This then leads to a price range of anywhere between $30,000 to $90,000, which is far cheaper than builds from companies that have an almost $300,000 tag.

There’s also the added bonus of ad revenue from their YouTube videos, which allows the couple to subsidize their prices while educating the public about how to DIY a camper van.

“Obviously there is demand and a lot of supply as well, but I think that’s been a factor in why we sell quickly because we really do try to price as fairly as we can,” Seth Eskelund said.

As Scarlett Eskelund describes it, this is both a lifestyle and a business, giving the couple fluid “accessibility.” When the COVID-19 pandemic is over, the pair will continue their business for as many months out of the year as they would like. For all the other months, they’ll resume their #VanLife dreams.

“It’s a means to an end,” Scarlett Eskelund said. “It allows us the ability to do what we really want to do.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

An RV subscription company just raised $37 million. Here’s how it plans to grow ahead of the expected summer travel boom.

Harvest Hosts
Harvest Hosts.

  • RV membership company Harvest Hosts recently received a $37 million investment from Stripes.
  • Harvest Hosts’ program allows RV travelers to stay overnight in locations like wineries and farms.
  • Joel Holland, Harvest Hosts’ CEO, explains how it’ll navigate the summer travel boom with this new investment.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Harvest Hosts, an RV membership company that gives RVers access to “unique” overnight stays, has found success during COVID-19, and a new almost $40 million investment will allow the business to continue its fast growth ahead of the predicted summer travel boom.

Road travel vehicle manufacturers specializing in RVs, camper vans, and trailers saw a huge spike in sales during 2020 as COVID-19 stopped would-be travelers from flying and cruising. However, these makers weren’t the only travel-adjacent companies that benefited from the coronavirus pandemic: from May 2020 to December, Harvest Hosts’ membership base doubled in size, the company says.

Prior to this, the company had already been growing fast due to the millennial #VanLife boom and retirees interested road travel. But when COVID-19 hit the US, “everything went into hyper-speed,” Joel Holland, CEO of Harvest Hosts, told Insider in an interview.

Read more: How the coronavirus pandemic will permanently change the transportation industry, according to 23 industry leaders

Harvest Hosts’ expanding business eventually caught the attention of Stripes, leading to its $37 million investment in the RV membership company. Stripes previously invested in companies like GrubHub, Reformation, and Refinery29.

“We look to back ambitious entrepreneurs who are delivering amazing products, and it became clear as we spent more time in the space that Holland is building a really special product for RVers,” Chris Carey, a partner at Stripes, said in a press release. “His vision for the company is something we are excited to be part of.”

How it works

Harvest Hosts
Harvest Hosts.

Harvest Hosts’ appeal is in its straightforward membership model. Members can tap into the company’s network of over 2,000 locations – known as “hosts” – across the US for overnight RV stays. The company’s hosts encompass a wide range of destinations, including breweries, farms, golf courses, and wineries, the latter the most popular option.

There are several stipulations to the membership program. For one, members must have a “fully self-contained RV” with a toilet and wastewater tanks. RV travelers are also required to notify the hosts ahead of their arrivals and are discouraged from staying longer than the allotted 24-hour overnight stay.

Annual memberships start at $79 for the classic package. This price then jumps to $199 for the classic package plus access to golf and country clubs. Overnight stays don’t come at any additional cost, but Harvest Hosts encourages its members to spend money at their destinations in order to support the local hosts.

“We keep our membership costs low because we want to encourage people to take the money they’re saving and spend it with the local businesses,” Holland said. Currently, about 60% of its members are retired, and over half have a six-figure-plus disposable income, making them a “powerful buying force,” Holland explained.

Last year, Harvest Hosts’ members spent over $25 million at the visited locations. Holland projects this will grow to $30 million this year, which translates to an additional $15,000 for winery-based hosts specifically.

Harvest Hosts has grown quickly. This is how its new investment will help

Harvest Hosts
Harvest Hosts.

The company’s rapid growth has been a constant for several years now. From 2018 to the COVID-19 pandemic, Harvest Hosts’ membership base grew ten times, and this growth only continued to accelerate through 2020.

According to Holland, new members began flocking to the company through the summer – as expected – into the winter. Travel normally hits a lull during winter, but the inverse happened for Harvest Hosts: interest in January and February 2021 were so high, the number of members spiked 400% compared to last year.

Now, the company is anticipating a massive summer travel boom, and consequently, the potential for further growth with the help of its new financial cushion and Stripes’ resources.

“Everything in this industry seems to be moving fast,” Holland said. “We want to make sure we can keep up, and the funding will help us do that.”

According to Holland, this $37 million investment will help Harvest continue the growth of both its host and member communities, all with the goal of becoming “the trusted resource for RVers when they’re looking for a place to stay.”

To do this, Harvest Hosts is now using the money to boost its location catalog from a little over 2,000 hosts, to 3,000 hosts by the end of the year. Looking even further ahead, the company is “racing to 10,000,” Holland said.

Along with this host growth, the Harvest Hosts is also building out features like improved “route planning tools” and a new reservation system meant to ease the hosting process.

“The faster we can get more hosts onboard, the better for our members and these small businesses,” Holland said. “The more we scale, the better everyone does, so I’m excited to [do so] as quickly as possible, and that takes money. “

Are you a travel industry employee or have a travel industry story to share? Contact this reporter at bchang@insider.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I rented a camper van through Outdoorsy, the Airbnb for RVs, and it’s the perfect platform for first-time RVers

frank olito camper van
I rented this camper using Outdoorsy.

  • I booked a camper van for a weekend road trip through Outdoorsy, the Airbnb for RVs. 
  • I had trouble with my van and with customer service, but it was a largely positive experience. 
  • Although the van was expensive, Outdoorsy provided me with the necessary tools for a first-timer. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

When I decided to rent a camper van for a short road trip in January, I admittedly didn’t know where to start. 

Quickly, I learned there are three main sites for RV rentals: Outdoorsy, RV Share, and Cruise America. After doing some research and reading multiple RV blogs, I found most people agreed that Outdoorsy was the best of the three

Outdoorsy is a peer-to-peer rental service (much like Airbnb) that started in 2015. Over the years, the platform has expanded and today there are over 200,000 vehicles listed for rent in over 4,800 cities and 14 countries. Jen Young, CMO and co-founder of Outdoorsy, told Insider in December 2020 that the number of RV rentals made on the site skyrocketed during the pandemic. 

I, too, decided to rent a camper van during the pandemic after years of wondering if life on the road was for me. Ultimately, I booked a 2015 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van through Outdoorsy for a weekend trip from New York City to Philadelphia.

From booking to talking with customer service, here’s what planning a road trip through Outdoorsy is like.

First, Outdoorsy’s landing page prompted me to search for an area in the US and plug in my travel dates.

Outdoorsy's landing page.
Outdoorsy’s landing page.

I typed in New York City and then the dates I was looking to rent the van. I was surprised it didn’t ask me any other information, like how many people were traveling or what type of vehicle I was looking for. 

After I entered this basic information, the available vehicles were listed in a grid on the left and laid out on a map on the right.

outdoorsy review
The available vehicles.

There were two things that stood out on this page. First, Outdoorsy’s business model is largely the same as Airbnb, where people rent out their homes for travelers. Essentially, all the vehicles listed on this page are owned by people in the New York area who want to rent out their RVs when they aren’t using them. The resemblance doesn’t end there: This page is even laid out like Airbnb’s website. 

The second aspect that stood out to me was the variety of vehicles that were listed. There were over 500 options when I searched, and some were traditional RVs, towable trailers, and camper vans. 

At the top, there were filters, which helped narrow down my search significantly.

outdoorsy review
The filters.

There were six tabs at the top of the screen that helped narrow the search. In those tabs, I was able to specify that I wanted a camper van — I figured taking a larger, more traditional RV would be too difficult for a novice. I also specified that I wanted to pay less than $500 per night and wanted the camper van to be delivered to my home on the day of my departure. 

Only a few camper van owners allowed for delivery — as most renters pick up the vehicles themselves — so my options quickly became limited.

After narrowing my search, there were only two camper vans that suited my needs, so I began chatting with the owners directly.

outdoorsy review
The messages.

The first van I liked was a 2014 Dodge Sprinter that was located in Connecticut for $200 per night, while the second one was a more luxurious 2015 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter and located in New Jersey for $400 per night. While their prices varied greatly, each had plenty of bright, large pictures that showed off every inch of the vehicle. 

Like Airbnb, I had to message and confirm with the owners before actually booking the camper van. The messaging system is built directly into the website, and I received a text message and an email each time an owner sent me a response. 

In my conversations with both of the owners, I confirmed the price and asked if they would be able to drop off and pick up the van on my travel dates. 

Unfortunately, one of the owners decided I was too far away, so I went with the 2015 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter. 

Before booking the more luxurious van, I double-checked the list of amenities to ensure it had everything I needed.

outdoorsy review
All the features listed.

These visual icons clearly helped confirm that the van had everything I would need on my short road trip, including enough room for two people, a bathroom, and fresh water.

When double-checking the page, I became concerned about one aspect of the van: There was a 75-mile limit each day, and I would be charged for every mile that I went over. This would mean I couldn’t travel that far outside of New York City if I wanted to keep the price low. When I looked at the other vehicles on the platform, most didn’t have this requirement. I chatted with the owner again, and he explained that he put the limit on the van because he didn’t want people traveling too far.

In the end, I decided to proceed with the booking anyway because this camper van was a perfect match for my needs. 

Once the owner confirmed the price and dates, the booking process was simple and fast.

outdoorsy review
The Mercedes Benz page.

The camper van cost $400 per night plus $200 for delivery and pick up. An additional $180 was added to the bill for insurance, which included up to $1 million in property damage protection and a $2,000 deductible. 

In the end, the grand total for a three-night rental came to $1,700. I was also notified that Outdoorsy would take a $3,500 security hold that would be refunded when the van was returned. 

I was surprised by how expensive the camper van was for just a short weekend road trip. For $1,700, I could fly to Europe and back again. According to Outdoorsy, the price of a rental on the site can vary greatly depending on the type, style, and size of the vehicle, but in 2020, the average price for a rental was $161 per night.

While the van I rented was priced a bit higher than most of the other vehicles on Outdoorsy, it was more luxurious, so I was paying for the high-end features. 

Leading up to the arrival of my van, I turned to Outdoorsy for some much-needed guidance.

outdoorsy review
RV travel tips.

Since I had never traveled in an RV or a camper van before, I knew I had a lot to learn. Luckily, Outdoorsy provided teaching tools that were built into the site. On the camper van’s page, there was a section titled “RV Travel Tips,” which had detailed videos explaining delivery, propane tanks, and WiFi. 

Additionally, I was having trouble finding an open campground that was located within driving distance from New York City in the middle of the winter. I turned to Outdoorsy again, which had a section on its website that lists campgrounds near certain points of interest across the US.

When the camper van finally arrived outside my apartment in Brooklyn, we instantly ran into some issues.

camper van frank olito
The camper van in Brooklyn.

During the walk-through of the van with the owner, he discovered a leak from the bathroom that was pouring into the living space at the back of the van. After investigating further, he decided he needed to cancel my booking and bring the van back to his shop. 

The co-founder of Outdoorsy, Jen Young, told me that vehicles listed on Outdoorsy must be inspected every 90 days, but these issues do arise. 

Although it was very frustrating to have my trip canceled just seconds before it was to begin, the owner assured me I could rent the van the following weekend. 

The problem was that Outdoorsy was not aware of the new booking we agreed to. Nervous that I was going to be charged for a trip that never happened, I jumped on a call with customer service. 

The customer service rep I spoke to gave me conflicting information when compared with what the owner was told to do. I decided to reach out to customer service again via email. Unfortunately, every time I received an email back from them, it was from a different person who was more confused than the last. 

Ultimately, we were successfully able to rebook the camper van for the following weekend, but customer service did not offer any discounts for my troubles, which was frustrating. 

Young said Outdoorsy is working on a new product feature that will clear up the confusion among the customer support team in the future. 

“On the customer support front, we also learned a lot this past year after our busiest year on record, and we’re hard at work to address the areas we know we need to improve on in order to provide both our owners and renters with the best support possible,” Young said.

The following weekend, I was finally able to take the camper van out on the road – with Outdoorsy by my side the whole way.

Frank Olito camper van
The interior of the camper van.

When the owner dropped the van off the second time, he walked me through a quick tutorial of all the van’s systems. As a first-timer, I didn’t understand some of what he was saying, but I hoped for the best. During my journey, I did run into some issues with the heater and electricity, but I contacted the owner directly via his phone number instead of Outdoorsy. 

Owners should upload a manual of their vehicles to the Outdoorsy site so that renters can access it throughout their stay when issues arise. 

Outdoorsy did, however, send a text message early in my trip, explaining that I had free roadside assistance in case of “an unexpected emergency.” The text message included the phone number I would need if such a situation arose. Thankfully, it didn’t.

I also downloaded the Outdoorsy app just in case I needed it during the trip.

Outdoorsy review
The live chat function on the app.

I downloaded the app so that I could access my messages quickly. I also wanted the app because Outdoorsy has a 24/7 live chat function. Since I was a new RVer, I wanted to make sure I had every support system at my disposal. 

Although I ran into problems along my journey, I didn’t end up using the app at all, but it was reassuring to know it was there as an option. 

When I returned to Brooklyn, the owner came to pick up the vehicle in another easy process.

camper van frank olito
The camper van back in Brooklyn.

When the owner arrived, he inspected every inch of the vehicle to ensure I didn’t break or hit anything while traveling. Even though I went over the 75-mile-per-day limit, he decided to not charge me because of electricity and heater issues I had experienced.

After I signed a few papers, my first experience with Outdoorsy came to a close. 

I received an email to write a review of my journey a couple of days later.

outdoorsy review
The review screen.

Just like most reviews, Outdoorsy asked me to rate my experience on a five-star scale, to describe my overall experience, and to upload any photos from my trip.

According to the platform’s site, over 5,000 people have rated their experience with Outdoorsy a 4.87, which is 92% of customers.

Although there were a few mishaps along the way, in my experience, Outdoorsy is the perfect platform for first-time RVers.

Frank Olito camper van
The camper van and me.

From the beginning, it was clear that Outdoorsy’s main mission is to help acclimate new RVers to the world of road tripping. That fact is evident in their easy booking process and in the tools they provide both on their site and on their app. 

I believe the growing number of people who feel inspired to get out on the road for the first time because of the pandemic will feel reassured and confident getting behind one of these rigs thanks to Outdoorsy. I know I did. 

Even though I had trouble with my van, customer service was a bit confusing, and there are a few features that the company should improve upon, I always felt like I had a support system to help along the way — whether that be the owner himself or the support service via Outdoorsy. 

If I take another road trip in the future, I would probably use the platform again — but I’d choose a less expensive vehicle.  

Read the original article on Business Insider

This company created a $25,000 RV travel trailer designed to be towed by an EV like a Tesla

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

  • Polydrops unveiled the P17A, a travel trailer that can be towed by electric vehicles like Teslas.
  • The P17A has been an enormous hit since before it was publicly unveiled.
  • The trailer ranges from $24,990 to $36,140 depending on the add-ons, which includes a kitchen module.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Travel trailer maker Polydrops – which designs its tiny homes on wheels to look like spaceships – has taken a new approach to road travel vehicles by unveiling a trailer that can be towed by EVs, including Teslas.

The first Polydrops trailer was designed in 2017 and unveiled two years later. Since Polydrops’ conception, vehicles  have revolutionized and become increasingly electrified, and the travel trailer maker is now following this electrification lead with its own EV friendly towable.

Polydrops has always been known for its uniquely shaped, futuristic looking travel trailers, and this new unit is no exception. But unlike any previous model, the P17A is the “first travel trailer in the market designed for an EV,” and has been tested using a 2018 Tesla Model 3, according to Polydrops.

The P17A has since been a hit with the public since before it was officially unveiled.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

“We are getting an enormous amount of emails through our website,” Kyunghyun Lew, Polydrop’s founder, told Insider in an email interview. “We’ve sold to the local customers even before we officially launch the product, and one of them purchased it only with the 3D rendering images.”

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Like other road travel vehicle makers, Polydrops saw a boom in popularity following coronavirus-related lockdown measures.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

However, it closed its sales soon after to meet its orders and to create the P17A and the upcoming P21X, the latter a larger trailer model, according to Lew.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

The trailer has reduced air drag, rolling resistance, and weight to make it more EV friendly, according to Lew.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

During a test road trip from Los Angeles to Lone Pine, California, a 2018 Tesla 3 Long Range rear-wheel-drive towing the P17A logged 306 watt-hours-per-mile, according to Polydrop.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

As a result, the 2018 Model 3 could travel 245 miles on one charge even while towing the P17A.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Of course, this range varies per electric vehicle and model year, but on average, an EV towing a P17A has an energy consumption of 298 watt-hours-per-mile and a range of 251 miles, according to Polydrops’ website.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Source: Polydrops

The aluminum trailer has an aerodynamic shape, allowing the electric vehicle towing the 1,200-pound trailer to save some energy.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Now, onto the general basics of the trailer. The P17A uses foam core and aluminum for its structure and has batteries integrated into its floor.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

These batteries then supply between 2.4 to 12-kilowatt-hours of energy.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

This battery system also accompanies the solar panels, which then in turn supply between 260 to 520-watts of solar energy.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

The 2.4 kilowatt-hour battery can be upgraded to 4.8 or 12 kilowatt-hours for $2,000 or $8,000 respectively.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Similarly, the 260-watt solar panels can be boosted to 520-watt for an additional $800.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

A fully upgraded Polydrops trailer can last off-grid for six nights.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

“It is a freedom to stay anywhere, work anywhere,” Lew told Insider.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Elements like the upgraded suspension allow the trailer to travel smoothly.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

The trailer stands at about 13.5 feet long, six feet wide, and 5.3 feet tall. The interior width is 4.5 feet, which is bigger than the previous Polydrops trailer model.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

This allows the unit to fit a full-size mattress.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Power may be limited, but the insulated trailer still has amenities that make it comfortable to inhabit, including a heater and air conditioner.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Polydrops’ decision to run the entire HVAC system using battery power was inspired by customer feedback, especially from Tesla drivers, according to Lew.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

According to Lew, the P17A is Polydrop’s “most advanced” product yet with its temperature control system and insulated structure, both of which make it weather-tolerant.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

There are also interior outlets, including USB ports, to power up any other necessary tech.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Interior LED lights brighten up the space for nighttime camping.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

There are also several storage units throughout the tiny home on wheels, including a small closet with a clothes bar.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

No need for a campfire meal: the trailer can be upgraded with a kitchen add-on for $1,850.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

This add-on gives the P17A a refrigerator, an induction stovetop, a sink, a utensils holder, and storage units, including ones for fresh and greywater.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

The kitchen can be accessed from both inside and outside the trailer, which means there’s no need to crawl outside for a midnight snack.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Don’t want to bring a portable speaker? You can upgrade the P17A to include Bluetooth speakers for $500.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

The trailer can range from $24,990 to $36,140 with all of the most expensive add-ons included.

P17A travel trailer polydrops
The P17A travel trailer.

Read the original article on Business Insider