GOP Sen. Roger Marshall, who voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election, says he’s ‘so ready to move on’

Roger Marshall
Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas.

  • GOP Sen. Roger Marshall said that he wanted to “move on” from discussing his challenge of the election results.
  • “I made a decision based upon the facts that I knew at that point in time,” he said.
  • Former President Trump and his campaign spent months trying to overturn President Biden’s victory.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

GOP Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas on Saturday said that he was “ready to move on” when asked about his support of former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results.

During an interview with CNN’s Pamela Brown, Marshall was questioned about whether his actions played a role in continued Republican distrust of the 2020 election.

Brown referred to a recent CNN poll conducted in late April which showed that 70 percent of Republicans believe that President Joe Biden didn’t legitimately win last year’s presidential race. The same poll revealed that only 23 percent of Republicans think Biden won the election fairly.

“Republicans continue to believe in the lie that this election, the last election was stolen,” Brown said. “You voted to toss out millions of votes in Arizona and Pennsylvania. You also joined the Texas lawsuit attempting to throw out votes cast in four states.”

She added: “I’m curious. Looking back, do you have any regrets about your actions and any concern that they contributed to misinformation about the election?”

“We’re just so ready to move on,” Marshall replied. “I made a decision based upon the facts that I knew at that point in time. I was concerned then, and I still am today that six states broke their own laws or their own constitution. But it’s time to move on. It’s time for this country to heal. It’s time for a spirit of forgiveness to be happening.”

Read more: Meet Merrick Garland’s inner circle of 18 officials. They’ve got a packed plate investigating major police departments and even Rudy Giuliani.

Days before the January 6 certification of Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College victory, Marshall joined a group of GOP senators led by Sens. Josh Hawley of Missouri and Ted Cruz of Texas who sought to challenge the results.

“I cannot vote to certify the electoral college results on January 6 without raising the fact that some states, particularly Pennsylvania, failed to follow their own state election laws,” Hawley said at the time.

The repeated maligning of the vote count by Trump and his campaign fueled the deadly insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6, which disrupted lawmakers as they sought to certify the results.

Later in the interview, Brown continued to press Marshall about how his challenge of the election results adhered to his ideological support of states’ rights.

“We want voting to easier, cheating to be harder,” he said. “By us standing up to our concerns about those elections, about the election integrity … it has forced those states with their problems to come to back to the table and have those legislatures work together to make sure we have safer elections with higher integrity.”

He added: “In my heart, I did what I thought was the right thing. I think the country is moving in a better direction.”

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These are the 6 Republicans who voted against a bipartisan bill on anti-Asian hate crimes

ted cruz resign
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex.

  • The Senate voted Wednesday to move forward a bill that would address the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes.
  • In a rare bipartisan showing, almost all senators voted to advance the bill.
  • Insider reached out to the six Republican senators who voted to block the legislation.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Senate overwhelmingly voted on Wednesday to advance a bill addressing the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Led by Democrats Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii and Rep. Grace Meng of New York, the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act will require federal officers to “facilitate the expedited review” of hate crimes.

“It defines COVID-19 hate crime as a violent crime that is motivated by two things: (1) the actual or perceived characteristic (e.g., race) of any person, and (2) the actual or perceived relationship to the spread of COVID-19 of any person because of that characteristic,” according to the bill’s summary.

In a rare bipartisan effort, a vast majority of senators voted 92-6 to advance the bill – bringing it one step closer to passing.

But the legislation could still face a difficult path forward. Republicans only supported the procedure on the agreement they could add amendments to the bill after it advanced: They added 20.

Hirono told HuffPost reporter Igor Bobic, some of the amendments added, “have absolutely nothing to do with the bill.”

Senate leaders will now have to agree which amendments to consider in order to pass the bill through the Senate, “very, very soon,” Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a floor speech Wednesday.

Here are the six Republicans who voted “no.”

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas

Tom Cotton
In this May 11, 2017 file photo, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark.

A representative from Cotton’s office told Insider that he voted against the bill because “he’s working on related legislation.”

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas

Ted Cruz
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, asks a question during the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Tuesday, March 9, 2021.

Representatives from Sen. Cruz’s office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri

Josh Hawley Ted Cruz

Representatives from Sen. Hawley’s office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas

roger marshall
Sen. Roger Marshall (R-KS) questions Xavier Becerra, U.S. President Joe Biden’s nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., February 23, 2021.

Representatives from Sen. Marshall’s office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky).

Representatives from Sen. Paul’s office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama

Tommy Tuberville
2020 Alabama Republican US Senate nominee Tommy Tuberville

Representatives from Sen. Tuberville’s office did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

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Hallmark asks Republican Senators Josh Hawley and Roger Marshall to refund its political donations after they voted against Biden’s certification

Hawley Marshall
Senators Roger Marshall of Kansas and Josh Hawley of Missouri

  • Greeting card company Hallmark has asked two Republican senators to return its political donations after they voted against certifying Joe Biden as president on Wednesday.
  • It had donated $12,000 to Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri and Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas during the 2020 election cycle through its Political Action Committee (PAC), Popular Information reported.
  • “The recent actions of Senators Josh Hawley and Roger Marshall do not reflect our company’s values. As a result, HALLPAC requested Sens. Hawley and Marshall to return all HALLPAC campaign contributions.”
  • Hallmark is the first big company to ask for political donations back after pro-Trump rioters stormed Capitol on Wednesday. Others have pulled the plug on future donations.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Hallmark has asked Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri and Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas, two Republicans, to return its donations after they both voted against certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s election victory Wednesday.

Hallmark is the first big company to ask for political donations back in the wake of the Capitol siege and the later vote to certify Biden as president. Some companies, including Amazon, have suspended future political contributions to Republican lawmakers who voted against Biden’s certification, while others have paused all donations to both Republicans and Democrats.

Through its Political Action Committee (PAC), the greeting card company has donated $5,000 to Marshall and $7,000 to Hawley over the past two years.

Congress met on Wednesday to certify the result of the US presidential election. Fueled by months of conspiracy theories and baseless allegations of election fraud from President Donald Trump and his backers, rioters stormed the Capitol. Five people died during the siege.

Congress ultimately voted to certify Biden’s win, but eight Republican senators and 139 representatives voted against this, including Hawley and Marshall. Several other GOP lawmakers who had said they would join the group dropped out following the riots.

Read more: Lawmakers, Hill staffers, and reporters recount the harrowing experience as a violent pro-Trump mob broke into the Capitol to protest the electoral-vote count

Just hours later, Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called on Hawley, as well as Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, to resign, blaming them for the violence at the Capitol.

In December, Hawley said he would object to Biden’s certification, the first senator to make the announcement. He is a staunch Trump ally.

“At the very least, Congress should investigate allegations of voter fraud and adopt measures to secure the integrity of our elections,” he said. “But Congress has so far failed to act.”

On Monday, Hallmark asked both Hawley and Marshall to return its donations.

“Hallmark believes the peaceful transition of power is part of the bedrock of our democratic system, and we abhor violence of any kind,” the company told Popular Information.

“The recent actions of Senators Josh Hawley and Roger Marshall do not reflect our company’s values. As a result, HALLPAC requested Sens. Hawley and Marshall to return all HALLPAC campaign contributions.”

Major US companies including Amazon, Morgan Stanley, and Dow have said they will cut off donations to Republican politicians who opposed Biden’s certification as president.

JPMorgan, Google, Facebook, Citibank, and Microsoft, meanwhile, are among the companies temporarily pulling the plug on all political contributions.

FedEx, Target, CVS Health, and Walmart are currently reviewing their positions on political contributions, Popular Information reported. Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Ford, and Bank of America told the publication they would review donations on an individual basis.

“Just coming out with another public letter isn’t going to do much,” Thomas Glocer, the former CEO of Thomson Reuters, said on January 5 after a meeting of top CEOs to discuss the impact of pulling political donations.

“Money is the key way,” he added.

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