SNEAKER RESELLING SIDE HUSTLE: Your guide to making thousands flipping hyped pairs of Dunks, Jordans, and Yeezys

kickzmalik sneaker reseller
Gautam Malik is just one entrepreneur making thousands of dollars by reselling sneakers.

With the sneaker resale market continuing to thrive, Insider is covering all aspects of how to properly scale a business in the booming industry. From which sneakers to purchase to necessary technological investments, made in the form of bots that entrepreneurs entrust to nab pairs online, the following covers everything you need to know about how to break into the market that Cowen & Co. estimates could reach $30 billion globally by 2030.

Getting started

Sneaker reselling is based on a simple concept that guides many other businesses: buy low, sell high. You’ll want to figure out how to track expenses and figure out net profit on each pair sold. One entrepreneur who made over $125,000 in sales since January 2019 showed us his spreadsheet that he uses for tracking profits. You’ll also want to figure out your strategy. While some people might prefer to invest in a few pairs and wait for them to grow in value, others utilize a high-volume sneaker resale strategy to make money by moving product quickly at slimmer margins. Others focus on acquiring rarer pairs that can fetch thousands at auction. Some have even developed mathematical formulas to determine the best way to buy and sell. Lastly, it can be helpful to take a look at some up-and-coming sneaker resale websites to learn about new ways to make money in the industry.

Read more: A 16-year-old who made $125,000 in sneaker sales reveals his pro tips for young resellers looking to break into the multi-billion dollar industry

A sneakerhead who made nearly $7 million in sales last year reveals his secrets to tapping into the exploding multibillion-dollar resale market

The top sneaker seller on eBay who made $1.5 million in sales in 2019 reveals how he grew business to dominate the platform

We got a look at exact spreadsheet a 16-year-old uses to make thousands of dollars in sales as a major sneaker supplier to stores and boutiques

5 up-and-coming sneaker websites that resellers and collectors should use in 2020 to boost profit and nab hyped pairs

A sneaker reseller whose store has made millions in sales since 2018 shares the mathematical formula he uses to determine which pairs will skyrocket in value

Scaling your business

Once you nail down the basics, here are some tools to guide you on the next steps of growing your business. While many sneaker resellers can start from humble beginnings, it can take just a few months to hit sustainable profit margins. Attending sneaker events like Sneaker Con is a great way to build connections and make fast sales. But as your business grows, it is important to keep track of all of your sales and expenses to ensure that you file your taxes correctly each year.

Read more: Here are 5 steps that independent sneaker resellers live by to pay their taxes every season

How a formerly homeless sneakerhead with just $40 to his name built a multi-million dollar resale empire in 6 years

A sneakerhead who has attended more than 20 Sneaker Cons reveals his top 6 secrets for making the most money at a resale event

3 sneakerhead sisters could fetch over $1 million by selling thousands of their classic Nike, Adidas, and Reebok shoes through an exclusive eBay auction

Sneaker botting

In the sneaker resale world, a “bot” refers to a software application that expedites the online checkout process and helps resellers nab hyped pairs online – including limited-edition drops. Though a controversial aspect of the sneaker world, bots are often essential for purchasing the latest releases at retail prices. In many cases, these bots are built by former sneakerheads and self-taught developers who make a killing from their useful product. Bots, like sneakers, can resell for hundreds of dollars. There are even some bots that are meant to help users nab sneaker bots at retail. While sneaker-nabbing bots can give resellers a leg-up, they are often the cause of much distress on the side of footwear companies who are looking to mitigate the problem.

Read more: A sneaker reseller who uses multiple ‘bots’ to nab mass quantities of expensive shoes the moment they drop explains why the controversial tech is worth it

Inside the controversial underworld of sneaker ‘bots,’ where coded scripts resell for thousands of dollars and Twitter monitors can make or break a release

A 16-year-old’s sneaker bot business charged $200,000 in fees since October. Here’s how his 600-member group secures the coveted software before anyone else.

How a self-taught developer with no formal training made $700,000 in sales this year from his sneaker bot, Splashforce, that nabs hyped pairs in just milliseconds

As sneaker bots explode, a veteran reseller and YouTuber with over 160,000 subscribers reveals 3 steps to profiting from the lucrative tech

In the arms race between teenage sneaker bot users and footwear companies, one side is winning – and it’s not the billion-dollar companies

Cook groups and online services:

While they normally charge hefty membership fees, cook groups are exclusive forums that supply information for anyone looking to break into the multi-billion dollar market. They usually offer members access to botting services in addition to exclusive details related to drops. We got a look inside a couple of these groups, including Polar Chefs, a thriving cook group with over 400 members that was started by a teenager who employs 23 people to help him run the group. Cook groups are often run on Discord, a messaging platform that has become a hotbed for sneakerhead activity.

Read more: Exclusive sneaker resale groups make millions by paying insiders to leak information on valuable sneaker releases before they happen. Here’s a look inside one of these members-only forums.

Inside a teen’s exclusive sneaker cook group that makes him 6-figures in sales, employs 23 people full-time, and nabs pairs of the hottest sneakers on the market

How Discord went from gaming and alt-right hub to a sneaker cook group hotbed, where resellers charge fees to share their secrets for cracking the $2 billion resale market

A college dropout runs a multi-million dollar sneaker cook group, AMNotify, with thousands of members across the world. Here’s how he launched one of the first exclusive sneaker forums from a hospital bed in 2017.

Navigating the industry during the pandemic

While slowdowns in shipping and supply chains caused some problems for the sneaker industry early on in the pandemic, the value of certain pairs, like the Air Force 1 and Air Jordan 1, has remained strong. Experts say that some pairs, like the Nike SB Dunk Low Travis Scotts or the Jordan 5 Retro High Off-Whites, will likely skyrocket in value after the pandemic. The CEOs of GOAT, Stadium Goods, and Bump all predicted that the sneaker resale market will continue to grow, and the proof is in the businesses. One teen entrepreneur that we spoke to said his business soared during the pandemic, bringing in close to $500,000 in sales during quarantine.

Read more: The CEOs of GOAT, Stadium Goods, and BUMP outlined the best ways for sneaker resellers to navigate the multi-billion dollar market in the pandemic

The coronavirus outbreak is wrecking the sneaker resale industry, but investing in specific pairs can soften losses. Here’s how to navigate the market in crisis, according to the head of China’s Sneaker Con.

These are the sneakers most likely to skyrocket in value when the coronavirus panic dies down, according to the founder of the largest sneaker event in the world

A 17-year-old entrepreneur made close to $500,000 in sales reselling sneakers during quarantine. Take a look inside his pandemic-proof business model.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Rent the Runway enters the $30 billion resale market, making its secondhand designer clothes available for all shoppers to buy, as well as rent

rent the runway
Rent the Runway.

  • All Rent the Runway shoppers are now able to buy, as well as rent, its secondhand clothes.
  • Previously, only paying members of its clothes rental services could buy its clothes.
  • Rent the Runway has had a tumultuous pandemic year, closing stores and laying off staff.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rent the Runway, the designer clothes rental business, is now selling clothes too, entering a booming resale market.

This week, the startup confirmed that all shoppers could now buy used designer clothing from its site at a discount. Previously, this option was only available to people who paid an ongoing subscription to rent clothes.

The news of this change comes after a tumultuous year for the company. The pandemic ravaged its business and demand for renting one-off pieces or officewear dried up overnight, wiping $250 million from the company’s valuation and forcing it to close its stores and lay off or furlough half of its staff.

Meanwhile, the resale market is booming, and according to estimates from the analyst Jefferies, generates nearly $30 billion per year and is on track to make up more than 10% of the apparel market over the next 10 years.

Read more: EXCLUSIVE: Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman, one of the most successful female founders, is fighting to save her company

In an interview with Vogue this week, Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman said the company hoped to broaden its reach by reselling clothes.

“This is another way for customers to engage with us for the first time,” she told Vogue. “There’s a very broad audience of people who want to consume secondhand, but potentially didn’t come to our platform in the past because they weren’t ready to subscribe, or they didn’t have an upcoming party or event.”

And by combining rental with resale, the company can boost profit margins through multiple transactions on the same item, she said.

“Because we monetize the product through subscription, by the time we’re selling something, we may have already rented it a few times and made money on it.

“We don’t have to charge as much as some of our competitors, who only have one opportunity to make their margin. There’s a value to the customer that she’s likely going to find better pricing on our platform,” she said.

Rent the Runway already has a partnership with online resale platform ThredUp, which launched in September last year and brought used, unsold inventory onto ThredUp’s site. Insider contacted Rent the Runway and ThredUp for more details on their future plans for this partnership, but did not immediately hear back.

As of Thursday, hundreds of items from Rent the Runway were listed on ThredUp’s site.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Etsy plans to spend $1.6 billion buying Depop, a social shopping app that’s helping teens get rich. Some Depop sellers pull in $300,000 a year – here’s how to make money on it.

Depop
Depop is a social shopping app targeted at Gen Z shoppers.

Instead of spending weekends or school holidays washing dishes and waiting tables, entrepreneurially minded teens are launching mini businesses to earn money online.

Depop app
The Depop app.

This is largely thanks to new apps that enable young shoppers to buy or sell secondhand clothing and accessories.

Depop, which launched in Milan in 2011 and has quickly gained a cult following around the world, is one of them. 

Depop is easy to use, which is one of the reasons it’s so successful.

Depop
Downloading the Depop app.

Depop has amassed more than 30 million customers in 150 countries since launching in 2011.

First, you need to download the app.

Depop
The landing page on the app.

Depop counts companies such as Poshmark and ThredUp as its competitors, and has been described as a mix between eBay and Instagram.

Depop will then ask you to create a username, link the account to your email address, and add a photo that represents your brand.

Depop
Setting up your shop.

Unlike rivals such as Poshmark or eBay, there’s more of a communal aesthetic on Depop and sellers are primarily listing streetwear, vintage, or late 1990s/early 2000s fashion. 

You’ll need to describe the style of your brand and what you’re planning to sell.

Depop
Explain what you’re selling.

This description will appear just under your username on your personal page. You can also link to your Instagram page to promote yourself more.

Next, you set up your billing address details and link your account to your PayPal. This is where all payments are handled.

Depop
The process is fairly straightforward.

You also have the option to register as a business and add in the relevant tax details. 

It’s as simple as that.

Depop
Now you can list your first item.

You’re ready to go.

Once you have a profile, you can start listing new items for sale.

Depop
Catchy photos pay off.

Depop advises sellers to post at least four photos and a video to give the item its best chance of selling.

You select the category that the item falls under.

Depop
There are 14 categories in total.

These are umbrella categories, such as menswear, womenswear, or sports equipment, for example. You can add a more detailed description of the item in another box, however.

The seller must cover the cost of shipping each item.

Depop
Depop uses Hermes courier in the UK.

In the UK, for example, the seller can either choose to do this process entirely on their own or pay to use a Depop recommended delivery company.

If you’re shipping internationally, you need to set the price yourself. 

Lastly, add the price of the item you’re listing.

Depop
There are no set guidelines for pricing.

There are no set guidelines for pricing, but sellers are advised to benchmark their prices against other products listed on the app.

Depop charges a 10% fee on each item sold.

Depop
Sellers will lose 10% of what they earn on each item.

This 10% is taken off the total transaction amount, which includes the cost of shipping. 

Customers can like, comment on, or save an item to their profile, much like you can on Instagram.

Depop
It has an Instagram-like setup.

They can also leave reviews and rate the seller. This feedback appears on the sellers’ profile page. 

Etsy said Wednesday that it was buying Depop for $1.625 billion as it looked to expand its reach to the Gen Z market.

Depop
Depop is known for being popular with Gen Z shoppers.

90% of Depop’s users are under 26 and it has its sights firmly set on this consumer base.

The company says its mission is to empower young shoppers to disrupt the fashion industry and give them the chance to become entrepreneurs.

Emma Rogue, Depop Seller
Emma Rogue (@emmarogue_ on TikTok) runs the Depop shop Shop Rogue

“This company is for the next generation,” Rachel Swidenbank, vice president of marketplace at Depop, previously told Insider. 

And for some, selling on Depop is a lucrative hobby.

Emma Rogue Depop
Emma Rogue lists a Y2K Fuzzy Animal Print Minibag on her Depop for $22.50

Swidenbank said that some users pull in as much as $300,000 a year selling on the app

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Lululemon is diving into the $30 billion resale market by offering money for used yoga pants

Lululemon
Resale is becoming an increasingly important market.

  • Lululemon is piloting a new service to enable customers to swap used clothes for gift cards.
  • These clothes will be washed and resold at a discount.
  • Analysts are advising retailers to get into resale to make money and attract sustainability-conscious customers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Lululemon is dipping its toes into the booming resale market.

The athleisure clothing giant, which is known for its $100 workout leggings, announced Tuesday that it is launching a new resale initiative known as Like New.

Starting in May, customers will be able to return “gently used” Lululemon clothing to certain stores in California and Texas in exchange for a gift card to spend online at the brand.

These items will be washed and then available for other customers to buy back at a discount. A company spokesperson told Insider that the level of discount will depend on whether the item is in “like new” condition or “gently used.” Any items that don’t make the cut will be recycled. Lululemon said it is partnering with resale operations expert Trove to roll out this new service.

Lululemon is among the first major retailers in the US to make moves into the $30 billion resale market. Analysts say that there an immediate opportunity for companies to cash in on this growing market, while also showing customers and investors that they are more sustainability-minded.

Jefferies analysts recently estimated that the secondhand market will represent more than 10% of the apparel market over the next 10 years.

“Legacy retailers should start to take note, and find a way to participate,” these analysts wrote.

Offering resale options is especially important if Lululemon wants to attract younger customers, who are spending more on resale than any generation before, according to Jefferies.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Nike will now clean and resell used sneakers at discount prices in a US trial

Nike Refurbished
The refurbished shoes will be sold at Nike factory stores.

  • Nike said it would clean and resell sneakers returned by customers in 15 stores in the US.
  • Nike Refurbished will sell shoes returned within 60 days of purchase. Customers can buy them at a discount.
  • Nike said it wanted to stop shoes ending up in a landfill.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nike has launched a new program to clean and resell sneakers that have been used and returned by customers.

The athletics-wear giant announced Monday that “Nike Refurbished” would see “gently” or hardly worn shoes, or shoes returned with cosmetic flaws, cleaned and sold again at discounted prices. The shoes must have been returned within the company’s 60-day returns period to be resold.

In a press release announcing the news on Monday, the company did not say what would have previously happened when these sneakers were returned. Insider asked the company for comment, but did not immediately hear back.

The refurbished shoes will now be sold at its factory and outlet stores. This initiative is currently available at 15 US stores, but the company said it planned to add Nike Refurbished to more stores, to boost its sustainability and reduce waste.

While it promises to “help keep shoes out of landfills,” the new service also means Nike can stop some of its products reaching booming sneaker resale platforms such as StockX or GOAT.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Selling Your Stuff? Don’t Fall for These 5 Negotiating Tricks

Photo by Daniel M Ernst / Shutterstock.com

You can almost smell it in the air. Selling season is here. This time of year, people start to liquidate piles of stuff that have accumulated in their basements, garages and storage spaces. Selling season means negotiating season. After nearly three decades of buying and selling vintage goods, I’ve seen every bargaining strategy in the book — some innocent, some insidious. If you’ll be selling at…

What to know about the business of sneaker bots: the controversial tech that helps resellers flip hundreds of hyped pairs of Jordans, Dunks, and Yeezys

sneaker bots resellers 2x1
  • In the sneaker resale world, a “bot” refers to a software application that expedites the online checkout process.
  • Though certainly a controversial aspect of sneaker culture, bots are essential for purchasing latest releases at retail prices.
  • Here’s everything you need to know about the business of bots and their role in buying sneakers.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

There are a few of reasons people will regularly miss out on hyped sneakers drops. But odds are, it’s because of a bot.

In the sneaker resale world, a “bot” refers to a software application that expedites the online checkout process and helps resellers nab hyped pairs in seconds – including limited-edition drops and collabs.

When sneakers are released in limited quantities, it’s often a race to see which sneakerheads can input their credit card information on a website or app the fastest in order to checkout before the product sells out. Bots are specifically designed to make this process instantaneous, offering users a leg-up over other buyers looking to complete transactions manually.

Though bots are notoriously difficult to set up and run, to many resellers they are a necessary evil for buying sneakers at retail price. The software also gets around “one pair per customer” quantity limits placed on each buyer on release day.

As the sneaker resale market continues to thrive, Business Insider is covering all aspects of how to scale a business in the booming industry. And bots are a major part of that. From how to acquire and use the technology to the people behind the most popular bots in the market today, here’s everything you need to know about the controversial software.

Acquiring a bot

Bots, like sneakers, can be difficult to purchase. Most bot makers release their products online via a Twitter announcement. There are only a limited number of copies available for purchase at retail. And once sold out, bots often resell for thousands of dollars.

Some private groups specialize in helping its paying members nab bots when they drop. These bot-nabbing groups use software extensions – basically other bots – to get their hands on the coveted technology that typically costs a few hundred dollars at release.

Once the software is purchased, members decide if they want to keep or “flip” the bots to make a profit on the resale market. Here’s how one bot nabbing and reselling group, Restock Flippers, keeps its 600 paying members on top of the bot market.

How to properly use bots

While bots are relatively widespread among the sneaker reselling community, they are not simple to use by any means. Insider spoke to teen reseller Leon Chen who has purchased four bots. He outlined the basics of using bots to grow a reselling business.

Most bots require a proxy, or an intermediate server that disguises itself as a different browser on the internet. This allows resellers to purchase multiple pairs from one website at a time and subvert cart limits. Each of those proxies are designed to make it seem as though the user is coming from different sources.

For example, “data center”proxies make it appear as though the user is accessing the website from a large company or corporation while a “residential proxy” is traced back to an alternate home address. Whichever type you use, proxies are an important part of setting up a bot.  In some cases, like when a website has very strong anti-botting software, it is better not to even use a bot at all.

The anti-bot faction

While most resellers see bots as a necessary evil in the sneaker world, some sneakerheads are openly working to curb the threat. SoleSavy is an exclusive group that uses bots to beat resellers at their own game, while also preventing members from exploiting the system themselves. The platform, which recently raised $2 million in seed funding, aims to foster a community of sneaker enthusiasts who are not interested in reselling. 

We spoke to one of the group’s founders to hear about how members are taking on the botting community. 

The people behind the technology

In many cases, bots are built by former sneakerheads and self-taught developers who make a killing from their products. Insider has spoken to three different developers who have created popular sneaker bots in the market, all without formal coding experience.

Splashforce, a bot that services nearly 4,000 customers, was created by an 18-year-old who had previously described himself as “dirt poor.” The teen founder and co-owner of Adept, another major sneaker bot, initially earned money via a paper route. Meanwhile, the maker of Hayha Bot, also a teen, notably describes the bot making industry as “a gold rush.”

Each of these self-taught bot makers have sold over $380,000 worth of bots since their businesses launched, according to screenshots of payment dashboards viewed by Insider.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The sneaker resale market exploded in 2020. These were the most expensive sneakers that sold on The RealReal this year, where some pairs went for up to $20,000.

Most expensive sneakers of 2020
The sneaker resale industry has continued to thrive amid a pandemic.

  • The sneaker industry thrived in 2020.
  • Hyped collaborations and a surge in demand for the Air Jordan brand helped keep the sneaker resale market hot.
  • Luxury consignment platform The RealReal shared a roundup of the most expensive sneakers to sell on the platform in 2020.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

2020 was a fantastic year for sneakers, pandemic notwithstanding. 

While lockdowns and store closures initially hurt production, the industry quickly bounced back, thanks to a variety of factors that helped ignite demand for certain pairs.

Across all sneakers available on resale platforms, Air Jordan soared above the rest in 2020, in part, thanks to the launch of ESPN’s Michael Jordan docuseries “The Last Dance.” 

Read more: In the ‘year of Jordan,’ GOAT CEO says demand for the retro sneakers has skyrocketed for reasons other than the ‘Last Dance’ documentary

Beyond Air Jordan, a slew of interesting new releases this year also fueled the hype.

The controversial Ben & Jerry’s-themed “Chunky Dunkys” and the Grateful Dead SBs are still fetching more than $1,100 and $700 on StockX, respectively.

Thus far, the $2 billion sneaker resale market has proven to be somewhat pandemic-proof. GOAT, a leading sneaker resale platform, saw a surge of new sellers joining the app at the start of pandemic. StockX, another leading sneaker resale platform, announced in a July report that it had surpassed 10 million lifetime sales and had its two biggest sales months ever during the months of May and June.

As 2020 draws to a close, Luxury consignment retailer The RealReal shared a roundup of the most expensive sneakers to sell on its platform in 2020. From the always popular “Back to the Future” themed Nikes to the Tom Sachs Mars Yard, here were the top sellers:

10. Nike Air Force 1 Low Scarr’s Pizza

Nike Air Force 1 Low Scarr’s Pizza

Sold for: $5,000

These sneakers were a result of a collaboration between Nike and Scarr’s Pizza, a New York City restaurant. The shoes were released for friends and family in August of 2019 and were inspired by the restaurant’s retro look. 

9. Nike SB Dunk Low “Reese Forbes Denim”

Nike SB Dunk Low 'Reese Forbes Denim' Sneakers

Sold for: $5,250

Released in 2002, this sneaker marked skateboarding legend Reese Forbes’ second Dunk collaboration. The denim-on-denim silhouette has made this pair iconic.

8. Nike x Tom Sachs Mars Yard Shoe 1.0

Nike x Tom Sachs Mars Yard Shoe 1.0 Sneakers

Sold for: $5,300

Designer Tom Sachs collaborated with Nike to launch this sneaker that was inspired by his experiences with NASA scientists. The sneaker initially launched in May of 2012 and was re-released in 2017.

7. Jordan 1 Retro Legends of Summer Red Glitter

Jordan 1 Retro Legends of Summer Red Glitter Sample Sneakers

Sold for: $6,500

These glittered sneakers launched during Justin Timberlake’s and Jay-Z’s fall 2013 “Legends of Summer” tour. At the time of the release, only a few pairs were given to fans.

6. Nike Air Force 1 Low G Dragon Peaceminusone Para Noise

Nike Air Force 1 Low G Dragon Peaceminusone Para Noise Sneakers

Sold for: $8,000

This low-top sneaker features a yellow leather Nike swoosh and daisy embroidery on the tongue.

5. Jordan 1 Retro Legends Of Summer

Jordan 1 Retro Legends Of Summer Sneakers

Sold for: $8,000

These limited edition Jordan 1s are were also from Justin Timberlake’s and Jay-Z’s fall 2013 “Legends of Summer” tour. This pair only surfaced on the resale market about a year after it dropped at the concert. 

4. Nike MAG “Back To The Future”

Nike MAG ‘Back To The Future’ Sneakers

Sold for: $9,995

The shoes inspired by the ones Michael J. Fox’s character Marty McFly wears in”Back to the Future Part II” was released in 2011. A product description on the Stadium Goods website describes the shoe as “perhaps the most sought-after sneaker of all time.”

3. Jordan 3/8 Retro ‘Kobe Bryant’ PE Pack

Jordan 3:8 Retro ‘Kobe Bryant’ PE Pack Sneakers

 Sold for: $11,875

The Jordan brand released these special-edition Jordans on February 14, 2016, to celebrate basketball legend Kobe Bryant. These sneakers are a tribute to Bryant’s 20 years in the NBA and feature the colors of the Los Angeles Lakers.

According to Amir Azarcon, The RealReal’s sneaker and streetwear expert, this limited edition pack became even more popular after the sudden death of Kobe Bryant in January.

2. Air Jordan 1 High OG Dior

Air Jordan 1 High OG Dior

Sold for: $16,500

Designer Kim Jones collaborated with the Jordan brand for this iconic Dior sneaker, which Azarcon described as the sneaker of the year. Launched in April of 2020, this pair represents a successful cross between sneaker culture and the luxury fashion space.

1. 2005 Parra x Nike Air Max 1 Hyperstrike Albert Heijn Amsterdam

2005 Parra x Nike Air Max 1 Hyperstrike Albert Heijn Amsterdam Sneakers

Price sold for: $20,000

These sneakers were one of two pairs designed by Dutch artist Pieter Jansen (Parra Patta) that were inspired by his hometown of Amsterdam. The colors on this pair represent Albert Heijn, a Dutch supermarket chain.

“This is one of the most coveted Air Max’s in the world, and this pair sold in less than 24 hours on our site,” said Azarcon.

 

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