Trump claimed that he ‘made Juneteenth very famous,’ new book says

Trump Tulsa
Trump’s campaign planned to hold a rally on Juneteenth in 2020, but cancelled it after criticism.

  • Trump said he “made Juneteenth very famous” and “nobody had heard of it” before him, writes reporter Michael Bender.
  • The Trump campaign sparked backlash by initially planning to hold a rally that day in Tulsa.
  • Juneteenth marks the anniversary of the emancipation of enslaved Black Americans in 1865.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Trump boasted that he “made Juneteenth very famous” by the backlash his campaign sparked by inadvertently scheduling a rally on the day in Tulsa, according to a forthcoming book by Wall Street Journal reporter Michael Bender.

The episode and internal drama surrounding was recounted in an excerpt of the book, “Frankly We Did Win This Election’: The Inside Story of How Donald Trump Lost” published in Politico Magazine on Friday.

The Trump campaign didn’t know Juneteenth existed

Trump’s former campaign manager Brad Parscale, who selected the date and location for Trump’s first rally in months, was apparently unaware of the date’s significance in America.

Trump’s announcing the rally’s date to reporters caused massive publish backlash, adding to the mounting criticism Trump had received for his response to the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer.

Trump didn’t know about Juneteenth history until the blowback to his rally either and, according to Bender, was unaware that the White House had released public statements commemorating the day in 2017, 2018, and 2019.

Bender reported that when Trump queried a Black Secret Service agent about whether he’d heard of the day, the agent told Trump it was “very offensive” to him that he’d decided to hold a rally that day. Ultimately, the rally was moved to the next day, June 20.

But in a 2020 interview with Bender, Trump claimed “nobody had heard of it” before his rally and that “I made Juneteenth very famous.”

Read more: Meet the young entrepreneurs rebuilding Tulsa’s booming ‘Black Wall Street’ 100 years after a white mob burned it down

Juneteenth has been celebrated for generations

Juneteenth, celebrated on June 19, marks the day in 1865 when Union soldiers went to Galveston, Texas to tell the last remaining enslaved Black Americans that they were free. While former President Lincoln Abraham signed the Emancipation proclamation in 1863, it went ignored in many southern states for the next two years.

The holiday has been celebrated for over a century, particularly in Texas, but Juneteenth and the history it represents gained new national prominence in 2020.

Many major corporations made Juneteenth a company holiday in 2020, and on Thursday, President Joe Biden signed a bill passed by both chambers of Congress to make Juneteenth a federal holiday starting in 2021.

Additionally, the location that Parscale selected for the rally, Tulsa, is also the site of one of the deadliest outbreaks of racial violence in United States history.

In the 1921 Tulsa race massacre, a mob made up of white residents, with support from city officials, killed and injured hundreds of Black Tulsans and looted and destroyed countless businesses, eviscerating a vibrant business community – including a neighborhood called Black Wall Street.

In all, the mob is estimated to have killed as many as 300 Black residents of Tulsa and burned down huge swaths of the Greenwood business district. The riot also displaced thousands of Black Tulsans, with the Red Cross estimating that over 1,200 homes in the area were burned down and hundreds more looted.

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Major publishers are refusing to offer a book deal to a ‘radioactive’ Trump, according to report

donald trump book signing
Donald Trump signs copies of his book, “Crippled America: How to Make Our Country Great Again”, at Trump Tower on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, in New York.

  • Major literary publishers don’t want to touch a Trump book with a 10-foot pole, Politico reports.
  • One industry source told Politico Trump “has screwed over so many publishers” before his presidency.
  • Trump’s voluminous lies about election fraud make a Trump book a “fact-checking nightmare.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump boasted in a recent statement that he’s “writing like crazy” on “the book of all books” and “turned down two book deals from the most unlikely publishers.”

But in reality, all the major players in the publishing world are staying as far away from Trump as possible, Politico reported, citing both Trump’s “radioactive” standing following the January 6 insurrection and the daunting task of fact-checking his copious lies about the 2020 election.

Former presidents usually have no trouble landing huge book deals with enviable advances. Former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama, for example, jointly got a whopping $65 million advance from Penguin Random House for their post-White House memoirs following a heated bidding war.

In Trump’s case, however, it’s crickets from all the big publishing houses, according to Politico.

Read more: AOC and more than 100 lawmakers demand raises for Capitol Hill staffers as employees reach their breaking point with low salaries

Sources at major publishers Penguin Random House, Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins, Macmillan Publishers, and Simon & Schuster told Politico that they hadn’t heard anything about Trump being offered a book deal and aren’t keen to edit him anytime soon.

One industry source told Politico that in addition to the baggage from the insurrection, Trump “has screwed over so many publishers that before he ran for president none of the big 5 would work with [him] anymore.”

“It doesn’t matter what the upside on a Trump book deal is, the headaches the project would bring would far outweigh the potential in the eyes of a major publisher,” Keith Urbahn, co-founder of literary agency Javelin, told Politico, saying that a publisher willing to take on Trump “is looking at a fact-checking nightmare, an exodus of other authors, and a staff uprising in the unlikely event they strike a deal with the former president.”

Simon & Schuster faced internal dissent from staff after striking a deal with former Vice President Mike Pence.

Trump has written numerous books with the help of ghostwriters. His most successful book, “Art of the Deal,” was published in 1987.

It’s still possible that a smaller publishing house could pick up a Trump memoir, or that Trump could publish one on his own, Politico said.

His son, Donald Trump Jr., self-published his most recent book “Liberal Privilege: Joe Biden and the Democrats’ Defense of the Indefensible” after Center Street, a division of Hachette Book Group, published his 2019 book “Triggered.”

In both cases, bulk purchases from the Republican National Committee helped pad the book’s sales.

“Triggered” debuted at the top of the next week’s New York Times best-seller list for nonfiction, with an important caveat: a dagger symbol indicating a large percentage of the book’s sales came from “institutional, special interest, group, or bulk purchases.”

“It’s known in the industry as the ‘deadly dagger,'” a source told Page Six. “A rare penalty that is only called for flagrant fouls.”

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Law enforcement did not clear protesters from Lafayette Park for a Trump photo op, Interior Department watchdog concludes

doanld trump secret service fat guys
Former President Donald Trump walks back to the White House escorted by the Secret Service after appearing outside of St John’s Episcopal church across Lafayette Park in Washington, DC on June 1, 2020.

  • Washington, DC’s Lafayette Park was not cleared in June 2020 for a Trump photo op, the Interior Department watchdog says.
  • The US Park Police and Secret Service already planned on clearing the area to install new fencing.
  • Trump walked through the park after the plans to clear protesters were already in motion.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Law enforcement officials cleared Washington, DC’s Lafayette Park to put up fencing – not to enable former President Donald Trump’s now-infamous photo op at St. John’s Church in June 2020, an internal watchdog for the Interior Department concluded in a report released Wednesday.

On June 1, the Secret Service and US Park Police, with assistance from other agencies, used tear gas and other forceful methods, including pushing demonstrators and striking them with batons, to clear a group of largely peaceful protesters from Lafayette Square, which is right next to the White House.

The demonstrations took place just days after George Floyd was murdered by a former Minneapolis police officer and as Trump vowed that rioters and looters would be met with force.

Read more: These 7 federal judges have had past brushes with Trump and are now helping to decide the Capitol rioters’ fate

Shortly after the park was cleared, Trump and other officials arrived on scene to walk through the park. He was then photographed holding up a Bible outside St. John’s Episcopal Church. The controversial photo op drew sharp criticism from Episcopal leaders, and created the perception that Trump had the park cleared for his benefit.

The report from Inspector General Mark Lee Greenblatt, however, said that the area was cleared to allow contractors to install special anti-scale fencing to further secure the perimeter around the park. The new fencing had arrived that same morning, it said.

“The evidence we obtained did not support a finding that the USPP cleared the park to allow the President to survey the damage and walk to St. John’s Church,” the report said. “Instead, the evidence we reviewed showed that the USPP cleared the park to allow the contractor to safely install the antiscale fencing in response to destruction of property and injury to officers occurring on May 30 and 31.”

The report further concluded that the US Park Police didn’t know about Trump’s plans to walk through the park and take a photo until the afternoon of June 1, “hours after it had begun developing its operational plan and the fencing contractor had arrived in the park.”

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Trump bought into conspiracy theory that Democrats would sabotage Biden, replace him with Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama as presidential nominee, book says

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Former President Donald Trump.

  • Trump believed that Biden would be sabotaged and replaced as the 2020 Democratic nominee.
  • Trump firmly believed in a conspiracy theory that Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama would take over.
  • The Wall Street Journal’s Michael Bender reports on the episode in his upcoming book.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump believed a conspiracy theory that leaders in the Democratic Party would sabotage now-President Joe Biden at the 2020 convention and replace him with Hillary Clinton or Michelle Obama, according to a forthcoming book by Wall Street Journal reporter Michael Bender.

The latest nugget from the book, titled “Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost,” was published on Monday in Vanity Fair.

As late as April 2020, when all of Biden’s rivals had dropped out of the race, Trump bought into the falsehood that Democratic officials would replace Biden, who Trump referred to as “mentally retarded,” with Clinton or Obama, Bender wrote.

The idea, he wrote, apparently originated from former Clinton White House advisor Dick Morris who was informally advising Trump at the time.

Trump theorized that Democrats would “realize [Biden is] old, and they’re going to give it to somebody else. They’re going to give it to Hillary, or they’re going to give it to Michelle Obama.”

The conspiracy, according to Bender, led Trump to hold back on going after Biden because he was afraid that early and sustained attacks from the Trump camp could weaken Biden so much that Democrats would replace him with another candidate.

Eventually, Trump’s former top pollster Tony Fabrizio had to talk the former president down from the idea in a memo spelling out how the mechanics of the nomination process would preclude Biden’s last-minute replacement.

“The pollster aimed to debunk the theory by outlining the remaining Democratic primaries, in which Biden had no significant challenger, and the delegate math to secure the nomination,” Bender wrote. “Biden would have enough delegates to secure the nomination in just three weeks, Fabrizio explained, and it would be mathematically impossible to steal it in four weeks.”

“Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost” is being published by Twelve Books and will be released on August 10.

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Trump plans to rail against Dr. Fauci and harp on election fraud conspiracies as he returns to the rally circuit

trump rally ohio
Former president Donald Trump speaks during a “Keep America Great” campaign rally at Huntington Center in Toledo, Ohio, on January 9, 2020.

  • Trump is returning to the rally circuit this summer with a tried-and-tested set of grievances.
  • He reportedly plans to attack Dr. Fauci and repeat conspiracies about the 2020 election.
  • Trump will speak at a North Carolina GOP dinner on Saturday and then a Texas CPAC event in July.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump plans to reprise his set of greatest hits as he prepares to return to the rally circuit: going after Dr. Anthony Fauci and harping on his grievances about his 2020 election loss, according to Axios and CNN, respectively.

Trump has been laying low since leaving the White House, and tried running a short-lived blog after being de-platformed from social media. As the 2022 midterms approach, however, he is reportedly gearing up to resume regular public appearances for the GOP.

Trump is making his first public speech in months at a North Carolina Republican Party dinner on Saturday. He’s then set to appear at CPAC Texas, a major conservative conference to be held in Dallas from July 9-11.

With the GOP struggling to land successful attacks on President Joe Biden, Trump plans to most heavily target Fauci, the White House chief medical adviser, in the same way that he fixated on 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton for years after defeating her.

“People see Anthony Fauci and they think of shuttered businesses, lost school,” Trump senior adviser Jason Miller told Axios.

Trump and other conservatives have criticized Fauci’s decisions throughout the pandemic. But recently, Republican politicians and powerful conservative media figures have begun hammering Fauci anew. They are accusing him of mishandling and downplaying the theory that COVID-19 may have leaked out of a lab in Wuhan, China, instead of jumping from animals to humans at a wet market.

The so-called lab leak theory is receiving fresh scrutiny from the scientific community and the Biden administration, which has ordered the intelligence community to produce a report on COVID-19’s origins by the end of the summer.

Read more: ‘He wants to be in the fight’: Donald Trump told his former White House doctor that he wants to run in 2024

The Washington Post reported on Tuesday that Trump remains obsessed with his 2020 election loss and is paying close attention to ongoing ballot recount efforts in Maricopa County, Arizona. He is following news out of Arizona religiously and pushing for similar ballot reviews in Georgia and Pennsylvania, per The Post.

Trump has also latched onto a conspiracy theory that a bombshell Supreme Court case brought by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell will result in the court overturning the results of the 2020 presidential election and reinstating him as president by August, according to The Post, The New York Times, and the National Review. This, despite the fact that there is no constitutional mechanism for either of those things to happen.

Election integrity and election policy are now core issues for much of the GOP. Not all Republicans, however, are thrilled about the prospect of Trump returning to his rally tour, CNN reported, with many concerned that Trump sucking up oxygen for his personal grievances will drag down the party going into 2022.

CNN and Politico have reported that behind the scenes, people close to Trump, including Sen. Lindsey Graham, Trump’s former chief of staff Mark Meadows, and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, acknowledge that getting Trump to drop the election fraud grievances altogether is a lost cause. But they are working with him on substantive policy messaging for the GOP in 2022 that he can also incorporate into his speeches.

Trump playing a kingmaker role in 2022 could also cause headaches for some GOP figures. As The Post noted, acquiescing to Trump’s lies that the election was stolen from him or at least involved some level of fraud is becoming a litmus test for his support of 2022 politicians and GOP hopefuls.

Trump has publicly denigrated Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, one of the most vulnerable GOP governors up for reelection in 2022, over his certifying the 2020 presidential election for Biden.

And despite pleas from Sen. Rick Scott, who currently chairs the Senate GOP’s campaign arm, for Trump to stay out of Senate primaries, Trump is backing a primary challenge to Sen. Lisa Murkowski. He has also already publicly attacked Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Attorney General Mark Brnovich, two of the strongest potential GOP contenders to take on Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in 2022.

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Trump has told associates he will run again in 2024 if he’s healthy enough, report says

donald trump donald trump jr
Donald Trump Jr. looks on as Donald Trump, then a Republican presidential candidate, speaks in Las Vegas, Nevada, in February 2016.

  • Former President Trump will run for president in 2024 if he’s healthy, Politico reports.
  • Trump told Fox News in April that he is “very seriously” considering a presidential bid in 2024.
  • Some congressional Republicans are anxious about Trump running again, Politico said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump has told close associates that he plans to run for the White House again in 2024 provided that he’s in good health, Politico reported on Thursday.

The former president’s standing in the party took a fall in the wake of the January 6 insurrection on the US Capitol.

Rep. Ronny Jackson, who served as White House physician under Trump, also recently told Insider’s Kimberly Leonard that he believes Trump will run again.

“He has been saying he’s going to. He’s seriously considering it – he’s probably going to do it – so we’ll see what happens,” Jackson said.

Outside of his die-hard supporters, however, Politico reports that some congressional Republicans are anxious about a potential Trump 2024 campaign.

“President Trump did a lot of good. But he squandered a lot of his legacy after what happened after Nov. 3. And I think that’s a shame,” Sen. John Cornyn of Texas told Politico. “Running for president, you’re under a lot of scrutiny. And all I can say is there’s a lot to talk about.”

Read more: ‘He wants to be in the fight’: Donald Trump told his former White House doctor that he wants to run in 2024

Insider’s Tom LoBianco reported in April that Trump, who will turn 75 on June 14, has shed 15 pounds already through regular golf outings and cutting back on high-sugar snacks like M&Ms in his post-presidency. Visitors to Mar-a-Lago have taken notice of the changes in Trump’s appearance and overall health.

Despite his diminished stature within the party, Trump still plans on using his significant influence to be a kingmaker in the 2022 midterms – in some ways that could end up harming the GOP in key races.

Trump has publicly denigrated Gov. Brian Kemp, one of the most vulnerable GOP governors up for reelection in 2022, over his certifying the 2020 presidential election for Biden.

And despite the pleas from Sen. Rick Scott (who currently chairs the Senate GOP’s campaign arm) for Trump to stay out of Senate primaries, Trump has already publicly attacked current Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Attorney General Mark Brnovich, two strong potential GOP contenders to take on Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in 2022.

Trump told Fox News in April that he is “very seriously” considering another presidential bid in 2024 – and for now, he’s frozen much of the rest of the prospective field from planning their runs.

If Trump decides not to run, other possible frontrunners include former Vice President Mike Pence, Sens. Ted Cruz, Josh Hawley, Rick Scott, and Tom Cotton, Govs. Ron DeSantis of Florida and Kristi Noem of South Dakota, former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Another possible 2024 contender, former Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, recently told the Ruthless podcast that he won’t be waiting on Trump.

“I’m not going to defer to anyone if I decide that’s what I want to do and that I think I’m the best option for the party and for the country,” he said.

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A judge dismissed a Trump-endorsed lawsuit to audit votes in a Michigan county

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Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

  • A Michigan judge dismissed a 2020 election lawsuit heavily hyped by former President Trump.
  • The lawsuit over a local ballot proposal challenged the integrity of the county’s election.
  • Antrim County’s results were fully audited and hand-recounted in December, affirming Trump’s win.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Michigan judge formally dismissed a lawsuit seeking to audit and recount votes that former President Donald Trump heavily hyped as a “major” case, the Washington Post reported Monday

Trump posted a May 11 statement posted on his website cheerleading the Antrim County lawsuit, even though he was formally certified as winning the most votes in the county during the 2020 presidential election.

Trump touted the baseless contents of a “bombshell pleading” in a “major Michigan Election Fraud case” that he said will show that votes were “intentionally switched” to harm him, a claim for which there is no evidence.

He also compared the nonexistent fraud in the 2020 election to a heist of precious jewels, writing that if “a thief robs a jewelry store of all of its diamonds (the 2020 Presidential Election), the diamonds must be returned.”

Trump won a majority of votes in Antrim County but lost Michigan overall to now-President Joe Biden.

A human error with tabulating the results initially showed Biden winning the county. Antrim County Clerk Sheryl Guy, who happens to be a Republican, swiftly rectified the problem and certified the county’s election results for Trump, who carried the county with 61% of the vote with 37% going to Biden. Trump and his allies have seized on a quickly-corrected counting error in the county to spread disinformation about the 2020 election results.

The crux of the lawsuit filed by Antrim County resident Bill Bailey was about the results of a marijuana-related ballot initiative in the village of Central Lake, 9 & 10 News reported.

Bailey claimed he has the standing for the lawsuit because three ballots were spoiled during a recount for the initiative, though he does not actually live in Central Lake. Bailey asked the judge to allow him to conduct his own audit of all the 2020 election results, baselessly alleging that software developed by Dominion Voting Systems used in the election was intentionally programmed to falsify results.

The state of Michigan already audited the results

The Antrim County election results were already audited nearly five months ago, as lawyers for the townships and the Michigan secretary of state’s office noted in a May 11 hearing.

On December 17, officials from the secretary of state’s office oversaw a risk-limiting audit of the county’s election, conducted by bipartisan counting boards, that included a full hand-recount of all 15,000 ballots cast in the county affirmed Trump’s win over Biden. It boosted the margin of Trump’s win by 11 votes from 9,748 to 9,759. As the secretary of state’s office noted, it’s common for there to be slight changes in hand recounts due to human counters interpreting pen marks or write-in votes differently than ballot scanners.

The judge overseeing the case, 13th Circuit Court Judge Kevin Elsenheimer, dismissed the case as moot because Antrim’s results had already been fully verified in both the December recount and in a statewide post-election audit that finished up in March, according to the Post.

trump rally traverse city michigan
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after a campaign rally at Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City, Michigan, U.S., November 2, 2020.

Despite the recount, Bailey continued to press his lawsuit. His attorney Matthew DePerno, who has embraced Trump’s support for the legal efforts on social media, issued subpoenas to various Antrim County lawsuits, according to the Traverse City Record-Eagle.

Bailey also tried to expand the scope of the lawsuit by adding state and local election officials as defendants. In a hearing Money attended by 9 & 10 News, he claimed that expanding the lawsuit and having Elsenheimer enforce the subpoenas would allow him to prove the existence of widespread fraud. There is no evidence of widespread fraud.

Read more: Church attendance is to President Biden as golf outings were to President Trump

DePerno is also seeking a subpoena for Dominion. The election technology company has been the subject of a number of conspiracy theories falsely alleging it used its devices and software to “flip” results from Trump to Biden. The December audit found that Dominion’s technology accurately tabulated the county’s votes and played no role in the initially erroneous tabulation.

Jocelyn Benson
Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

Dominion is involved in several defamation lawsuits against election conspiracy theorists and right-wing media organizations it says pushed those false theories. Bailey’s lawsuit has been bolstered by an error-ridden “report” by Russell Ramsland, a conspiracy theorist championed by Trump. Attorneys for Dominion sent both Ramsland and DePerno document-retention letters in December, warning of “imminent” defamation litigation. A representative for Dominion directed Insider to a fact-check of Ramsland’s claims.

Attorneys for Antrim County and the Michigan secretary of state’s office asked Elsenheimer to dismiss the case in the May 11 hearing, arguing that Bailey’s legal rights had been satisfied by the December audit, which found that the results were sound. Elsenheimer said he’d decide whether to grant the dismissal next week, according to 9 & 10 News.

Despite his electoral loss, Trump has continued to falsely claim he was the true winner of the 2020 presidential election, and has endorsed a recount in Arizona’s Maricopa County that has been condemned by election experts.

If Bailey loses his Antrim County lawsuit, it will be another addition to the list of more than 40 failed election lawsuits from Trump and his allies.

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Trump is cheerleading a long-shot lawsuit to audit votes in a Michigan county he already won in the 2020 election

Trump
Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Trump is encouraging a 2020 election lawsuit in a Michigan county he already won.
  • An ongoing lawsuit over a ballot proposal challenges the integrity of the county’s election.
  • Antrim County’s results were fully audited and hand-recounted in December, affirming Trump’s win.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More than six months after the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump is hyping a lawsuit in a small Michigan county that he already won.

In a Monday statement posted on his website, Trump touted the baseless contents of a “bombshell pleading” in a “major Michigan Election Fraud case” that he said will show that votes were “intentionally switched” to harm him, a claim for which there is no evidence.

He also compared the nonexistent fraud in the 2020 election to a heist of precious jewels, writing that if “a thief robs a jewelry store of all of its diamonds (the 2020 Presidential Election), the diamonds must be returned.”

Trump won a majority of votes in Antrim County but lost Michigan overall to now-President Joe Biden.

A human error with tabulating the results initially showed Biden winning the county. Antrim County Clerk Sheryl Guy, who happens to be a Republican, swiftly rectified the problem and certified the county’s election results for Trump, who carried the county with 61% of the vote with 37% going to Biden. Trump and his allies have seized on a quickly-corrected counting error in the county to spread disinformation about the 2020 election results.

The crux of the lawsuit filed by Antrim County resident Bill Bailey is about the results of a marijuana-related ballot initiative in the village of Central Lake, 9 & 10 News reports.

Bailey claims he has the standing for the lawsuit because three ballots were spoiled during a recount for the initiative, though he does not actually live in Central Lake. Bailey is asking a judge to allow him to conduct his own audit of all the 2020 election results, baselessly alleging that software developed by Dominion Voting Systems used in the election was intentionally programmed to falsify results.

The state of Michigan already audited the results

The Antrim County election results were already audited nearly five months ago, as lawyers for the townships and the Michigan secretary of state’s office noted in a Monday hearing.

On December 17, officials from the secretary of state’s office oversaw a risk-limiting audit of the county’s election, conducted by bipartisan counting boards, that included a full hand-recount of all 15,000 ballots cast in the county affirmed Trump’s win over Biden. It boosted the margin of Trump’s win by 11 votes from 9,748 to 9,759. As the secretary of state’s office noted, it’s common for there to be slight changes in hand recounts due to human counters interpreting pen marks or write-in votes differently than ballot scanners.

trump rally traverse city michigan
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after a campaign rally at Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City, Michigan, U.S., November 2, 2020.

Despite the recount, Bailey has continued to press his lawsuit. His attorney Matthew DePerno, who has embraced Trump’s support for the legal efforts on social media, issued subpoenas to various Antrim County lawsuits, according to the Traverse City Record-Eagle.

Bailey is also trying to expand the scope of the lawsuit by adding state and local election officials as defendants. In a hearing Money attended by 9 & 10 News, he claimed that expanding the lawsuit and having the judge overseeing the case, 13th Circuit Court Judge Kevin Elsenheimer, enforce the subpoenas would allow him to prove the existence of widespread fraud. There is no evidence of widespread fraud.

Read more: Church attendance is to President Biden as golf outings were to President Trump

DePerno is also seeking a subpoena for Dominion. The election technology company has been the subject of a number of conspiracy theories falsely alleging it used its devices and software to “flip” results from Trump to Biden. The December audit found that Dominion’s technology accurately tabulated the county’s votes and played no role in the initially erroneous tabulation.

Jocelyn Benson
Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

Dominion is involved in several defamation lawsuits against election conspiracy theorists and right-wing media organizations it says pushed those false theories. Bailey’s lawsuit has been bolstered by an error-ridden “report” by Russell Ramsland, a conspiracy theorist championed by Trump. Dominion sent Ramsland a document-retention letter in December, warning of “imminent” defamation litigation. A representative for Dominion directed Insider to a fact-check of Ramsland’s claims.

Attorneys for Antrim County and the Michigan secretary of state’s office asked Elsenheimer to dismiss the case in Monday’s hearing, arguing that Bailey’s legal rights have been satisfied by the December audit, which found that the results were sound. Elsenheimer said he’d decide whether to grant the dismissal next week, according to 9 & 10 News.

Despite his electoral loss, Trump has continued to falsely claim he was the true winner of the 2020 presidential election, and has endorsed a recount in Arizona’s Maricopa County that has been condemned by election experts.

If Bailey loses his Antrim County lawsuit, it will be another addition to the list of more than 40 failed election lawsuits from Trump and his allies.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump endorses COVID-19 vaccination as a ‘miracle’ and ‘a real lifesaver’ in interview with New York Post

Trump vaccine Operation Warp Speed
President Donald Trump speaks during an “Operation Warp Speed Vaccine Summit” on the White House complex, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020, in Washington.

  • Former President Trump gave his strongest endorsement of vaccines yet to the New York Post.
  • “It’s one of the great achievements, a true miracle, and not only for the United States,” he said.
  • Trump also confirmed that he and the former First Lady were vaccinated.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Donald Trump called COVID-19 vaccines “a miracle” and said he “strongly recommend[s]” people get their shots in a new interview with the New York Post. It’s the former president’s most full-throated endorsement of vaccination yet.

“I’m all in favor of the vaccine,” Trump told Post columnist Michael Goodwin. “It’s one of the great achievements, a true miracle, and not only for the United States. We’re saving tens of millions of lives throughout the world. We’re saving entire countries.”

Read more: All signs point to a Justice Department Trump investigation taking a backseat to efforts in New York and Georgia

Trump confirmed to the Post that he and First Lady Melania Trump received their first vaccine doses at the White House in January and their second vaccine doses in Florida. It is unknown whether they received the Pfizer and BioNTech or Moderna vaccine.

The former president said that both Trumps, who were sick with COVID-19 in early October 2020, didn’t have any side effects to the vaccines, “not even a bit of arm soreness.”

“The vaccine is a great thing and people should take advantage of it,” Trump told the Post, adding, “nobody should be forced, we have our freedoms. But I strongly recommend it because it’s a real lifesaver.”

Even while taking credit for the development of COVID-19 vaccines, Trump did not get his shot publicly, on camera, or participate in a PSA that included all living former Presidents and First Ladies.

And despite touting its own efforts to encourage vaccination, including an editorial board op-ed and front-page spread telling New Yorkers to “GET VAXXED” in all caps, the Post itself has recently published a number of stories that were widely criticized for irresponsibly raising doubt about vaccines.

One story (that has since been taken down) linked, without evidence, the death of a 21-year-old college student to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and another claimed that COVID-19 vaccines were linked to herpes while using a stock photo that appeared to show a person with shingles.

The United States has administered nearly 219 million vaccine doses, according to the Centers for Disease Control. As of Thursday, about 52% of the US population over 18 has received at least one dose and 34% has been fully vaccinated.

After a four-month push to get the most vulnerable individuals vaccinated, all states opened up vaccination to everyone 16 and older on April 19, following guidance from the Biden administration.

With seven-day averages of vaccination rates beginning to slow, experts predict that the US will reach a “tipping point”of vaccine supply exceeding demand. Both public opinion polls and analysis of vaccination rates in counties that voted for Trump indicate that Trump’s supporters, particularly white, Republican men, remain the most hesitant to get vaccinated.

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Trump says the Supreme Court ‘should be ashamed of themselves’ for not taking up election cases

supreme court trump
Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump wave a flag at the Supreme Court as the court reviews a lawsuit filed by Texas seeking to undo President-elect Joe Biden’s election victory in Washington, U.S., December 11, 2020.

  • Former President Trump said the Supreme Court “should be ashamed of themselves.”
  • Trump slammed all the justices, except for Justices Alito and Thomas, in an interview with Lisa Boothe.
  • The Court declined to take up several cases over the 2020 election results.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump said the Supreme Court, including justices he nominated, “should be ashamed of themselves” for not taking up cases relating to the 2020 election in a podcast interview with Fox News’ Lisa Boothe released on Monday.

“The Supreme Court should be ashamed of themselves. Now Justice Thomas, Justice Alito, I’m going to take them about because they felt obviously different about what happened, but the Supreme Court should be ashamed of themselves,” Trump said.

In the interview, Trump continued to falsely claim that the 2020 election was stolen from him and pushed misleading claims that entire states’ election results were invalid because courts or other officials made changes to election rules without an act of legislation from a state legislature.

The Court declined to take up a last-minute, wide-ranging original jurisdiction lawsuit launched by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton that sought to have the Court overturn election results in five states that voted for President Joe Biden on the basis that election rule changes were made without the approval of the state legislature.

The order dismissing the case cited Texas’ lack of standing in bringing the suit, stating that Texas had no “judicially cognizable interest in the manner in which another State conducts its elections.” Justices Alito and Thomas said that they would have agreed to take the case, but would “not grant any other relief.”

Both Trump and several Republican lawmakers signed on as amici in the suit.

The Court deadlocked 4-4 in a case where Republicans challenged the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s ruling to extend the deadline when mail ballots had to be received, from Election Day, November 3, to Friday, November 6. The Supreme Court’s tie left the lower court ruling in place, but the Court instructed Pennsylvania election officials to sequester all ballots that arrived in that timeframe.

Around 10,000 mail ballots arrived in that timeframe, not enough to affect the outcome of the election either way.

After the election, the Court also dismissed two remaining cases over Pennsylvania’s mail ballot deadline as moot in late February. Republican litigants in those cases advanced a theory known as the independent state legislature doctrine, which posits that only state legislatures and not courts or other officials have jurisdiction to change election rules.

In his dissent, Justice Thomas argued that the cases present a rare chance for the Court to definitively rule on a pressing issue in a case that isn’t taking place in the midst of an election cycle.

“These cases provide us with an ideal opportunity to address just what authority nonlegislative officials have to set election rules, and to do so well before the next election cycle. The refusal to do so is inexplicable,” he wrote.

Notably, the justices included in the group that Trump said “should be ashamed” included the three he nominated between 2017 and 2020: Justice Neil Gorsuch, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and Justice Amy Coney Barrett, nominations that Trump heavily emphasized throughout his presidency.

In the months leading up to the election, however, the Court handed down several rulings that sided with Republicans or GOP-controlled states in blocking election changes like extensions of mail ballot receipt deadlines, lessening of witness signature requirements, and expansions of curbside voting, for example.

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