Bubble tea drinkers could be out of luck as a shortage of boba and other products may make the sweet drink hard to find

bubble tea
Bubble tea. bebe14/Shutterstock

  • Bubble tea supplies are running low amid a shortage caused by backed-up US ports.
  • Tapioca pearls, popping bobas, and flavored powders and syrups are stuck in transit.
  • The products are the latest among many that have faced a shortage during the pandemic.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Your favorite bubble tea shop may not be serving its signature drink for a while as shipping delays are keeping some retailers from getting the supplies to make the sweet beverage.

The shortage started about a month ago, according to Oliver Yoon, the vice president of sales and global marketing for Boba Direct, a Chicago-based nationwide supplier of bubble tea products.

US ports on the East and West Coasts have been overwhelmed for months as consumer spending has increased along with a bevy of logistical issues amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Boats, carrying tens of thousands of shipping containers, are waiting outside ports.

“It’s a perfect storm really,” Yoon said.

Bubble tea, which has exploded in popularity in recent years, is a Taiwanese milk tea drink with a variety of flavors that features chewy pearls of tapioca. Supply has been tightened for the last month, Yoon said, and it’s not likely to let up until the end of April at the earliest.

Bubble tea products like tapioca pearls, popping bobas, flavored powders and syrups, and disposables, are all stuck in a “huge bottleneck,” said Yoon.

But it’s not just bubble tea. “It’s pretty much any kind of consumer product,” Yoon said.

Starbucks franchises, for example, aren’t able to fulfill customer orders of the new oat milk drink offerings and baristas are even reporting shortages of cups and syrups. Fitness gear, roller skates, and furniture, among other products also have been hampered.

Read more: Apple’s reportedly delaying its next Macs and iPads thanks to a global parts shortage, and it’s a bad sign for the whole tech industry

One bubble tea shop owner named Alex Ou told The San Francisco Chronicle, which first reported on the shortage, that some consumers won’t buy a drink if there’s no boba. “They’re literally here for the boba,” he told the publication.

But consumers just need to be patient, said Yoon. “This is temporary, not forever.”

For retailers selling bubble tea, they’re frustrated, too, said Yoon.

“I get it; they’re a small business, and they’re trying to survive. We’re all in the same situation – just trying to survive,” he said. “COVID really affected the situation with importing. No one anticipated what happened last year; it’s one of these domino effects later on in the future.”

Have you tried to order a food or drink item but were told it was sold out for the time being? Email the reporter of this article at ndailey@businessinsider.com.

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A quick guide to HDMI cables, one of the most common ways of connecting our devices

hdmi cable
HDMI cables transfer digital data from one device to another and are commonly used tech accessories.

  • HDMI cables give users a singular streamlined way to transfer audio and video between dozens of different kinds of devices.
  • HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface, which refers to a form of digital data transfer – a way to get an audiovisual signal from one device to another.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

If you’re trying to find a way to set up a new device with your TV, or share media in some other way besides casting, you’ve probably come across the term HDMI cable in your search.

You’ve also, however, probably come across the names of other cables, too – and cable combinations, device suggestions, different terms for different types of cables – overall, it can be a bit confusing to try to learn the definition of each acronym and remember the shape of their ports.

The HDMI cable is one of the most common and versatile cables out there, used for all kinds of things, from televisions to laptops to streaming devices and more. When first foraying into the world of tech accessories, this is one of the most essential ones to learn about.

GettyImages 838254868 (1)
The HDMI slot located in the back of a TV.

What to know about HDMI cables

HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface. An HDMI cable is a single cable that is able to transmit audio and video from one device to another with one of these HDMI connections, rather than the two- to three-wire combos people needed before HDMI became more common.

Benefits of HDMI

HDMI was invented to create a new standard that would be useful across a number of devices, while also combining audio and visual input to make the wiring less complex for consumers. Before we had HDMI, people who wanted to hook up any kind of audiovisual equipment usually had to plug in two or three different wires in the right places in order to be able to properly display sound and picture.

These previous connections were also far less standardized – hooking up a Nintendo GameCube to your television was different than trying to hook up a DVD player, which was different than hooking up a digital camera. Having the singular, standard connection type has made it far simpler to navigate a world of increasingly complex technology.

That’s not the only reason that a new data transfer format became necessary, though. When HDTV came onto the scene in the mid-2000s, it became necessary to create a new standard that has the capacity to reliably transmit high-definition signals. HDMI transfers have more bandwidth and a higher refresh rate per second, which means that pictures and sound are much smoother and higher quality.

How to set up dual monitors in Windows 10 and boost your productivityWhat is USB-C? The latest and most powerful type of USB cable, explained‘Is Thunderbolt the same as USB-C?’: What you need to know about Thunderbolt 3’s high-speed connectivity, in relation to USB-C cablesWhat is an Ethernet cable? Here’s how to connect to the internet without Wi-Fi and get a speedier connection

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