Howard Stern warns of ‘another Civil War’ ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections as he bashes Georgia GOP senate hopeful Herschel Walker

Howard Stern; Herschel Walker.
Howard Stern; Herschel Walker.

  • Howard Stern warned of “another Civil War” ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections.
  • The radio icon made the comments as he bashed Georgia Republican US Senate hopeful Herschel Walker.
  • “I mean, how the fuck could you elect that guy?” Stern said.

Radio icon Howard Stern warned of “another Civil War” ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections as he bashed Georgia Republican US Senate hopeful Herschel Walker and questioned how anyone could vote for him. 

“Some of these candidates that people are actually — fucking Herschel Walker. Holy fuck. They’re saying he’s going to win in Georgia. Are you fucking dummies?” Stern said Monday on his Sirius XM radio show

The shock jock added: “They always talk about another Civil War. I think there is going to be one. I mean, how the fuck could you elect that guy? You got to be outta your fucking skull.”

“I don’t care what party, what you believe, what you think would be good for America. Would you really vote for this fucking — I don’t know what the fuck he is,” Stern said of Walker. “I was going to say mental case but I don’t even know if that’s fair to mental cases.”

Walker, who has been backed by former President Donald Trump, is seeking to unseat Democratic rival Sen. Raphael Warnock in the tight Georgia Senate race in the midterm elections. 

Recently, Walker’s campaign has been rocked by controversies involving two women who have said the pro-life candidate previously pressured them to have abortions. 

Walker, a former University of Georgia football legend, has denied the allegations. 

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At an election-eve rally for Brian Kemp, backers of the Georgia governor said Donald Trump is their ‘top choice’ for 2024

Brian Kemp
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp speaks to attendees at a pre-election rally at the Cobb County International Airport in Kennesaw, Ga., on November 7, 2022.

  • At a GOP rally in suburban Atlanta’s Cobb County, there was widespread support for Gov. Brian Kemp.
  • Many of those same voters said they want to see Donald Trump in the White House again.
  • Trump has long blasted the governor for not helping him overturn Biden’s 2020 win in Georgia.

KENNESAW, Georgia — GOP Gov. Brian Kemp on Monday celebrated what he said were enduring accomplishments of his administration as he made the case for reelection against his opponent, Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams, with just one day to go before the election.

During a rally in Cobb County, a pivotal suburban Atlanta locality where Republicans in recent years have seen their political advantage falter amidst a growing Democratic-trending electorate, Kemp went through a long list of conservative priorities that he’d pursued while in office, from tax cuts to opposing some of the most draconian coronavirus policies enacted by other states.

“We were one of the first states to start kids back in-person and get them out virtual learning,” Kemp said during his remarks, where he touted his economic record and sharply criticized both Abrams and President Joe Biden. “We have the most people working ever in the history of the state.”

Kemp became a national figure after his first gubernatorial contest against Abrams in 2018 and once again after he refused to entertain then-President Donald Trump’s entreaties to overturn the 2020 presidential election results. He also overcame Trump’s ire about the Georgia results to swamp his gubernatorial primary opponent — ex-Sen. David Perdue — this past May.

Trump also went after Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger over his refusal to reject Georgia’s election results in 2020, seeking to replace him as the GOP nominee with Rep. Jody Hice. However, despite the endorsement, Raffensperger trounced Hice in the May primary and was a featured speaker at Monday’s pre-election rally.

Despite Trump’s frustration at Kemp over the 2020 election, several voters at the governor’s rally stood in favor of his tenure in office, while simultaneously expressing support for the former president should he decide to run in 2024, which appears to be an increasingly likely prospect.

Rally attendee John Morjera told Insider that Kemp paid attention to public safety and inflation in a way that was broadly appealing, adding that the governor made “a wise decision” in reopening the economy earlier than many other states. Also, he said, Kemp temporarily suspending the state gas tax and raising the teachers’ pay were great moves.

In Morjera’s view, the governor has already earned another four years in office, but when it came to the 2024 presidential campaign, he was all in for a third Trump presidential campaign.

“President Trump is still my top pick for the next presidential election,” Morjera told Insider. “I’m open to other candidates, but he’s my top choice.”

Ursula Magy, another attendee, said she was unsure about 2024, as the next election seems far away at this point — but she was supportive of the conservative policies pursued by Kemp.

After Kemp spoke at the rally, Donna Wexon told Insider that she liked his anti-abortion stance and believed his policies were “good for the economy.”

She was yet another “yes” when it came to Trump pursuing a White House bid agai.

“I would support Donald Trump running for president again. I think he had excellent policies that helped keep our country productive and we were respected in the world,” she said.

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Live updates: Voters head to the polls for the US midterm elections with the balance of the House and Senate at stake

2022 General Embeds
  • America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections. 
  • The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate. 
  • Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country. 
Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: Report

Trump
Former president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.

Aides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.

According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. 

The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.

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What to watch for on Election Day 2022

voting 43
“I Voted” stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.

Today America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.

Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.

The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats’ tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president’s party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. 

The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it’ll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.

There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor’s race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. 

Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.

This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.

Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens’  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.

Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.

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Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: Report

Donald Trump
Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Dayton International Airport on November 7, 2022 in Vandalia, Ohio.

  • Trump wanted to announce a 2024 bid on Monday, right before midterm voting, per The Washington Post.
  • Aides successfully persuaded him not to, fearing it’d upend the election, its report said.
  • Trump is now expected to announce a 2024 bid on November 15. 

Aides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.

According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. 

The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.

Top Republicans have long been concerned that if Trump announced before the midterm election, it could distract from their attempts to make the election a referendum on President Joe Biden’s performance, and issues including inflation and education. 

In the end, Trump held off making the announcement, and instead dropped another massive hint he’d be running, saying at the rally that he’d make “a very big announcement” on November 15 at his Mar-a-Lago estate.

(Axios last week reported that Nov. 14 would be the date when Trump would likely announce his candidacy.)

“We want nothing to detract from the importance of tomorrow,” Trump said at the rally. 

Trump for months has been gearing up for another bid for the presidency, backing a slew ardent loyalists in the midterms who have pushed his baseless claims that victory was stolen from him in 2020.

He has dropped a series of increasingly strong hints in recent public appearances that a formal announcement is imminent. 

Republicans are predicted to make significant gains in the midterms, with the data website FiveThirtyEight heavily favoring the party to retake the House, and slightly favoring them to retake the Senate.

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Congress lifts debt-ceiling on same day as deadline that risked plunging country into economic chaos

Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California.

  • The House voted 221 to 209 to pass a $2.5 trillion increase to the debt ceiling early Wednesday.
  • The hike pushes the next debt-limit battle to 2023 and averts a possible default mere hours before the deadline.
  • Hitting the debt ceiling risked erasing months of progress in the continuing pandemic recovery.

The House passed a $2.5 trillion increase to the debt ceiling early Wednesday morning, staving off an economic disaster just ahead of an urgent deadline.

The body voted 221 to 209 at around midnight eastern time to lift the limit on how much the government can borrow. Only one Republican joined Democrats in backing the measure. The vote comes after the Senate passed it earlier in the day along party lines.

The late-night vote marks the final step for Congress to pass the increase and send it to President Joe Biden for his signature. It also saves the US economy from crisis just hours before a dire cutoff. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen previously warned the government would hit the debt ceiling on December 15, and that breaching the deadline risked a default on federal debt.

The $2.5 trillion hike is expected to push the next debt-ceiling battle past next year’s midterm elections and into 2023. Although the Build Back Better plan making its way through Congress would add roughly $1.75 trillion to the deficit, only some of the related borrowing would happen before 2022. Expectations for Republicans to take control of the House could tee up an even more intense fight over the limit when it approaches next, as the GOP has been extremely critical of Biden’s spending agenda.

The debt ceiling limits how much the government can borrow to cover its bills for past spending. Congress came close to hitting the limit in October as Republicans pushed Democrats to raise the ceiling on their own through the time-consuming reconciliation process. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered Democrats a 2-month extension in early October to dodge default, punting the problem into December.

The latest fix involved an even more novel process. Congress approved a one-time rule change last week to carve out the filibuster and allow Senate Democrats to raise the ceiling with a simple majority. The measure opened the door for Democrats to avoid catastrophe while letting Republicans say they didn’t directly vote to raise the ceiling.

Sen. Dick Durbin told reporters on Tuesday that the $2.5 trillion sum was agreed to in negotiations with Republicans on the rule change.

Fourteen Senate Republicans voted with Democrats to pass the one-off reform, but other GOP members raised concerns over the deal striking a new precedent. The agreement struck by McConnell and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to lift the limit “was a mistake,” and it was “cynical” to connect the measure to Medicare funding, Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri told Insider on Thursday.

Letting the House vote to change Senate procedure “on something this contentious” was “not the way to go,” Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told Insider.

For now, the country can rest easy knowing the debt ceiling isn’t looming over the pandemic recovery. A self-imposed default would be disastrous for the still-healing economy. Hitting the ceiling could quickly freeze payments to government workers and service members, halt Social Security payouts, and immediately destroy trust in the US dollar. Without the last-minute votes, the country could’ve plunged into a wholly new and unprecedented recession.

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House passes a bill sponsored by Rep. Ilhan Omar that would create an envoy at the State Department to combat Islamophobia

Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota at a news conference addressing Rep. Lauren Boebert’s Islamophobic comments on Capitol Hill on November 30, 2021.
Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota at a news conference addressing Rep. Lauren Boebert’s Islamophobic comments on Capitol Hill on November 30, 2021.

  • The House passed a bill sponsored by Rep. Ilhan Omar that would create a special envoy to combat Islamophobia.
  • The vote comes following an incident in which Rep. Lauren Boebert made Islamophobic and racist remarks about Omar.
  • All House Democrats voted on Tuesday for the bill, while 212 Republicans voted against.

The House of Representatives on Tuesday passed a bill sponsored by Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota to create a special envoy at the State Department to monitor and combat Islamophobia.

The “Combating International Islamophobia Act” addresses anti-Muslim violence worldwide and was introduced by Omar and fellow Democratic Rep. Jan Schakowsky of Illinois over two months ago.

Every House Democrat voted on Tuesday for the bill, while 212 Republicans voted against it.

“There are cynics who would rather see us divided on racial, ethnic, gender and religious lines because it suits their political agenda,” said Omar on the House floor as she spoke in support of the bill. “But I believe as Americans, we should stand united against all forms of bigotry. In fact, this legislation is modeled on the special envoy to combat anti-Semitism.”

The White House announced its support for the bill earlier on Tuesday, highlighting language in the bill that “calls attention to instances of forced labor, reeducation, or the presence of concentration camps, such as those targeting Uyghur and other minorities” in Xinjiang, China. 

Hanging over the vote was the specter of Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert’s Islamophobic comments against the bill’s sponsor, in which the far-right Colorado congresswoman insinuated that Omar was a suicide bomber.

Despite Omar’s legislative victory, progressive Democratic lawmakers insist that Boebert’s comments must be directly addressed.

Ahead of Tuesday’s vote, House Democratic Caucus Chair Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York called the bill “an important step to deal with the dynamics that are in front of us” — even as party leadership remains undecided about how to respond to Boebert’s comments.

“I don’t think, as far as I can tell, anything specific beyond the Islamophobia resolution has been ruled in or ruled out,” Jeffries said during a news conference. “That’s still a discussion to be had as we move forward, but this is a decisive, important action to be taken today.”

Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts — a fellow “Squad” member — introduced a resolution last week to strip Boebert of her committees, issuing an implicit warning to Democratic leadership that she and other progressives expect swift action.

“Inaction is to be complicit in Islamophobia,” Pressley said as she introduced the resolution. But asked by Insider ahead on Tuesday about the lack of action so far on punishing Boebert directly, Omar sounded a conciliatory note.

“I don’t think there’s a lack of action,” Omar told Insider. “Action will happen, but we’re just trying to figure out how to strategically do this.”

Boebert’s Islamophobic remarks about Omar

Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado pays her respects to former Sen. Bob Dole as he lies in state in the Rotunda of the Capitol on December 9, 2021.
Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado pays her respects to former Sen. Bob Dole as he lies in state in the Rotunda of the Capitol on December 9, 2021.

The bill’s passage on Tuesday comes amid widespread condemnation of Boebert’s recent Islamophobic remarks, according to a video that surfaced on Thanksgiving.

In it, Boebert tells an audience an uncorroborated tale about riding an elevator in Congress with Omar earlier this year.

Boebert said she stepped onto an elevator with Omar on her way back to her office after a vote, prompting a Capitol Police officer to run towards the elevator with “fret all over his face.” Boebert described being confused about the encounter before noticing Omar standing in the elevator with her.

“Well, she doesn’t have a backpack. We should be fine,” Boebert said she told the officer.

Boebert said she then turned to Omar and added: “Oh look, the Jihad Squad decided to show up for work today.” “Jihad Squad” is a derisive and racist term for the Squad, a group of six progressive members of Congress who are all people of color.

Democrats have repeatedly — but so far unsuccessfully — called on Republican leadership to discipline Boebert. Both House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Minority Whip Steve Scalise have declined to forcefully condemn Boebert’s Islamophobic rhetoric or take any meaningful action against her, instead praising the congresswoman for a phone call she made to Omar after the video surfaced, which ended in Boebert calling her “anti-American.”

McCarthy spoke with House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer to facilitate the call in the wake of Boebert’s comments, but stopped short of denouncing them. The phone call appeared unproductive: Omar accused Boebert of refusing to “publicly acknowledge her hurtful and dangerous comments,” while Boebert said Omar should make a public apology to the American people for her anti-American, anti-Semitic, anti-police rhetoric.” 

Amid mounting criticism, Boebert offered an apology on Twitter to “anyone in the Muslim community I offended with my comment.”

Omar afterward held a press conference with the only two other Muslim members of Congress — Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Andre Carson of Indiana — where she played a voicemail of a graphic, Islamophobic death threat she received after Boebert’s remarks.

And last Thursday, as Omar’s bill was being marked up in the House Foreign Relations Committee, Republicans mocked the bill and downplayed the threat of Islamophobia, with one GOP member filing an amendment pushing the baseless claim that Omar had married her brother. 

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After he asked Biden to help his own state of Kentucky, Rand Paul lashed out at critics who brought up his history of opposing disaster relief bills

Sen. Rand Paul at a Senate hearing
Sen. Rand Paul prepares to hear Secretary of State Antony Blinken testify during a Senate Foreign Relations Hearing to examine the United States withdrawal from Afghanistan on Capitol Hill on September 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Historic tornadoes devastated the midwest, especially Kentucky. 
  • GOP Sen. Rand Paul sent a letter to President Joe Biden to ask for disaster relief. 
  • Critics were quick to call out his history of opposing disaster aid for other states. 

Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul lashed out at critics who called him a hypocrite for requesting federal funds when his state was devasted by tornadoes, but he has a lengthy history of opposing disaster relief bills, The Washington Post reported. 

On Saturday, the morning after a storm created historic tornadoes, Paul wrote President Joe Biden a letter asking him to move “expeditiously to approve the appropriate resources for our state.”

The most damage and destruction hit Kentucky, with more than 70 people killed.

Critics were quick to call out that the letter was in contrast to Paul’s rigid opposition to federal disaster relief efforts in the past. 

“We should do all we can to help our Kentucky neighbors. God be with them — they are hurting. But do not for one second forget that @RandPaul has voted against helping most Americans most times they’re in need,” Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell wrote in a tweet

Following Superstorm Sandy in 2013, Paul opposed a disaster relief measure for the Northeast and told WFPL that while the area needed help, he’d like to offset the cost with cuts elsewhere in the federal budget. 

“I would have given them $9 billion and I would’ve taken the $9 billion from somewhere else,” Paul said at the time.”I would have taken it from foreign aid and said you know what, we don’t have money for Egypt or Pakistan this year because we have to help the Northeast.”

In 2017, Paul opposed a disaster relief bill for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. 

“People here will say they have great compassion and they want to help the people of Puerto Rico, the people of Texas, and the people of Florida but notice they have great compassion with someone else’s money,” Paul said in a speech on the Senate floor at the time. 

On Saturday Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar said she’s glad Paul has finally realized that “states needing federal assistance after a disaster isn’t gritty, wasteful or being ‘compassionate with someone else’s money.'”

“We are one Nation and should always be able to count on one another regardless of your state’s politics. This is America,” Omar said. 

Paul told the Post on Tuesday that he’s routinely requested emergency aid for Kentucky and that he has “never been opposed to the program, ever.” He said he was opposed to using “borrowed” money to fund disaster relief and not offsetting the cost elsewhere in the federal budget.

“That’s different than saying, ‘Oh, he now wants it because it’s in his state and he never wanted it [before],’ ” Paul told the Post. “I’ve never opposed anybody’s disaster relief in any other state. I’ve just asked that it be paid for.”

In July, Paul also opposed the Gulf Coast Hurricane Aid Act, which would have given $1.1 billion in federal aid for people impacted by hurricanes Laura and Delta. That bill even had a financial offset of using some of the $80 billion in proceeds from a 2020 radio spectrum auction, the Post reported. 

While critics are lashing on to Paul’s hypocrisy, lawmakers across the aisle have called for funds to help tornado victims. 

“I have always voted for disaster aid, and we shouldn’t hold it against disaster victims when their politicians are not doing their job,” Democratic Sen. Richard Durbin, whose state of Illinois was also impacted by the tornado told the Post.

Paul’s office did not respond to Insider’s request for comment at the time of publication. 

 

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2 Republicans joined with House Democrats to hold Mark Meadows, Trump’s former chief of staff, in criminal contempt of Congress

Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 30, 2020.
Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 30, 2020.

  • The House voted to hold Meadows in contempt for defying a subpoena from the January 6 committee.
  • Two Republicans on Tuesday joined every Democrat to refer this case to the Department of Justice.
  • Meadows and Steve Bannon have been held in contempt for defying the committee.

The House of Representatives voted on Tuesday to hold former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows in criminal contempt of Congress after he defied a subpoena from the House Select Committee investigating January 6.

The full House vote came after the committee voted unanimously on Monday to refer Meadows to the Department of Justice, which will now weigh potential criminal charges against the one-time chair of the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

The tally was 222 to 208. These are the two House Republicans who voted with their colleagues across the aisle to hold Meadows in contempt:

  • Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois

Meadows is the second person to be held in criminal contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a congressional subpoena from the January 6 committee. In October, nine Republicans broke ranks and voted to refer Steve Bannon to the DOJ. The one-time White House chief strategist ultimately surrendered to the FBI on November 15 before pleading not guilty two days later.

The committee has also voted to hold Jeffrey Clark, a high-level DOJ official under former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for his refusal to cooperate with the committee. But a full House vote holding him in contempt has been stalled by his intention to claim his 5th Amendment rights in a deposition scheduled for December 16.

‘He has to lead now. It has gone too far.’

Donald Trump Jr. speaks at a rally on The Ellipse on Jan. 6, 2021.
Donald Trump Jr. speaks at a rally on The Ellipse on Jan. 6, 2021.

Tuesday’s vote follows the release of a 51-page document by the House committee on Monday, which included the resolution recommending to find Meadows in contempt of Congress.

The document included new revelations, including that Meadows wrote in an email that the National Guard was on standby to “protect pro Trump people” and that he used his own cellphone, two personal Gmail accounts, and the encrypted app Signal to conduct government business. 

During a committee hearing on Monday evening, Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming also revealed texts — sent by Trump family members, Fox News hosts, administration officials, members of Congress, and reporters — that called on Meadows to get former President Donald Trump to call off the rioters.

“He’s got to condemn this [shit] ASAP. The Capitol Police tweet is not enough,” Donald Trump Jr. texted Meadows, per Cheney, who is the vice chair of the panel.

“I’m pushing it hard. I agree,” Meadows wrote back in a text.

Trump Jr. continued to text Meadows to get Trump to respond to the riot, writing: “We need an Oval Office address. He has to lead now. It has gone too far and gotten out of hand.”

‘No intention of respecting boundaries’

Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, 2 of the Republicans who voted to hold Mark Meadows in criminal contempt of Congress, on July 27, 2021.
Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, 2 of the Republicans who voted to hold Mark Meadows in criminal contempt of Congress, on July 27, 2021.

At the center of Meadows’ refusal to comply with the committee’s subpoena is his claim that he’s shielded by Trump’s assertion of executive privilege or his right to keep the information confidential. Trump’s lawyer had previously advised the president’s former aides, including Meadows, to defy the subpoena, on the same grounds.

The former North Carolina congressman briefly cooperated with the committee, turning over documents, including the texts that the panel revealed on Monday. But that ended last week when Meadows sent a letter to the committee through his lawyer, accusing the group of having “no intention of respecting boundaries concerning Executive Privilege.” 

The contempt vote came after Meadows failed to provide additional documents and to appear for scheduled testimony before the committee to answer questions about what happened on January 6.

“We believe Mr. Meadows is improperly asserting executive and other privileges,” Cheney said on Monday. “He is in contempt of Congress.”

Also last week, a federal appeals court rejected Trump’s bid to block the committee from obtaining executive branch documents for its investigation into the riot. Trump asserted executive privilege over the documents, but President Joe Biden didn’t uphold the request, authorizing the National Archives and Records Administration to hand over the materials to Congress. Trump responded by suing Congress and the National Archives to keep the files confidential.

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Trump says Mike Pence has been ‘mortally wounded’ in the GOP because he refused to help overturn the 2020 election

Donald Trump and mike Pence at the Republican National Convention in 2020
Then-President Donald Trump and his VP Mike Pence at the Republican National Convention in 2020.

  • Donald Trump said Mike Pence was “mortally wounded” by his decision to certify the 2020 vote count.
  • On Sunday, Trump berated Pence, accusing him of not having the “courage” to overturn the election.
  • “Mike should have sent those crooked votes back to the legislatures,” Trump said.

Former President Donald Trump laid into former vice-president Mike Pence over the weekend, saying Pence was “mortally wounded” in the GOP after the latter refused to overturn the election results on Jan. 6. 

Trump was speaking at a ticketed event in Florida with former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly when he told the crowd that he thought Pence had been “very badly hurt” by allowing the 2020 election to be certified. 

“Mike Pence is a good man. He served me well. I was disappointed only in one thing, but it was a big thing. It’s like saying we won the game, we win another game, but we got our ass kicked in the World Series,” Trump said. “Mike should have sent those crooked votes back to the legislatures and you would have had a different result in the election, in my opinion.” 

On Sunday, Trump also criticized Pence for not having the “courage” to not certify the vote.

“I think Mike has been very badly hurt by what took place in respect to Jan. 6,” Trump said, according to footage of the event obtained by CNN. “I think he’s been mortally wounded, frankly, because I see the reaction he’s getting from people.”

Representatives for Pence did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider. 

In January, Pence publicly broke with Trump and certified the results of the 2020 election, even as Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, with some calling for Pence to be hanged.

In recent months a memo written by Trump-allied lawyer John Eastman that urged Pence to not certify the vote, and outlining how Pence could hand the election to Trump was revealed.

Pence, meanwhile, has stood firmly by his decision to certify the election results on Jan. 6. In November, Pence said he was guided by founding father James Madison and the Bible when he decided to break with Trump and certify the vote. 

“Psalm 15 says he keeps his oath even when it hurts,” Pence said, citing a verse from the Bible and alluding to the oath of office he took to defend the Constitution. “I understand the disappointment in the election. You might remember I was on the ballot. But you’ve got to be willing to do your duty.” 

Insider’s Tom LoBianco reported in May that Pence might be laying the groundwork for a potential 2024 presidential run by attending events and conferences and re-emerging into the public eye.

Trump himself has teased a presidential run but stopped short of formally announcing it. However, the former president has indicated that he might tap Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis as a vice-presidential candidate if he runs in 2024

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Manhattan prosecutors investigating Trump for fraud are looking into whether he lied to his own accountants, a new report says

Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump.

  • Prosecutors are investigating if Trump lied to his own accountants, The New York Times reported. 
  • Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. is investigating the Trump Organization for fraud. 
  • The Times reported that his office recently interviewed one of Trump’s accountants and a banker.

Prosecutors in Manhattan are investigating former President Donald Trump as to whether or not he lied to his own accountants, The New York Times reported.

The news comes as investigators with the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. continue their years-long probe into whether former President Donald Trump and the Trump Organization misrepresented his finances to lenders and investors.

Prosecutors found that the accountants put together financial statements that were given to lenders and investors based on the information given to them by the Trump Organization, The Times reported.

Sources familiar with the investigation told The Times that the office of Vance Jr. recently questioned one of Trump’s accountants before a grand jury, as well as his longtime banker.

New York Attorney General Letitia James’ office is also investigating the Trump Organization, The Times reported. Prosecutors in Vance’s office are working with James’ office to see if the former president “cherry-picked” favorable financial information to present to lenders while ignoring unfavorable data.

Last month, Insider’s Eliza Relman and Jacob Shamsian reported that the two offices are investigating whether the Trump Organization intentionally gave government officials and potential lenders dramatically different property valuations. 

While Trump may not have personally prepared the data for the accountants, The Times reported that the documents reviewed showed his approval. 

“Donald J. Trump is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statement in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America,” his accountants wrote in a cover letter attached to the statements in 2011 and 2012, according to The Times report. 

The outlet reported that prosecutors are looking to determine if the financial statements were based on Trump’s own “exaggerated claims,” which could serve as evidence that he intended to mislead his own accountants and lenders. 

However, The Times added that Trump placed disclaimers in the documents presented that said data hadn’t been audited or authenticated and that those disclaimers can help his defense. 

A spokesman for Vance’s office declined to comment. 

Representatives for Trump did not respond to Insider’s request for comment at the time of publication. 

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