Jared Kushner reportedly wants ‘a simpler relationship’ with Trump and has ‘mostly dropped out’ of orbit of ex-campaign advisors: NYT

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Jared Kushner looks at former President Donald Trump.

Jared Kushner, the son-in-law of former President Donald Trump and a former White House senior advisor, has reportedly told some of Trump’s closest advisors that he wants “a simpler relationship” with the former president, according to The New York Times.

While former Trump campaign managers Bill Stepien and Brad Parscale are still tied into Trumpworld, Kushner, who is married to the former president’s oldest daughter, Ivanka, has stepped back.

According to The Times, Kushner “wants to focus on writing his book and establishing a simpler relationship” with the former president.

With Kushner out of the spotlight, Donald Trump Jr., the president’s oldest son, has become the most politically-active member of the family in the former president’s orbit at the moment.

The news would confirm a new trajectory for Kushner, who was intimately involved in a myriad of legislative and political initiatives in the Trump years, from engaging in peace talks in the Middle East to aiding the president’s reelection campaign.

It also comes on the heels of a CNN report from March where several sources said that Kushner was “tapped out” from the political world as Trump was emerging from his Mar-a-Lago resort to speak at this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Florida.

Read more: We identified the 125 people and institutions most responsible for Donald Trump’s rise to power and his norm-busting behavior that tested the boundaries of the US government and its institutions

Just last year, Kushner was one of the most prolific advisors in Trump’s orbit, with the former president lauding him as “my star” during a roundtable on policing reform.

During the event, Kushner praised law-enforcement officials for “coming together to fix” policing after hearing the “cries from the community.”

“Hopefully at this time where there’s a lot of people in the country who are feeling different pain and feeling different concerns, law enforcement can be a leader in coming together and helping us work towards bringing solutions that could bring this country forward,” Kushner said at the time.

Kushner has kept a relatively low profile since Trump left the White House in January.

That same month, The Wall Street Journal reported that Kushner and his wife were renting a Miami beach condo following their $32 million purchase of a plot of land for a new home on Indian Creek, a private island in Miami-Dade County.

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‘Maybe I just wasn’t good enough’: Elizabeth Warren reflects on unsuccessful presidential campaign in new book

Elizabeth Warren
Then-US presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks during a rally at Washington Square Park in New York on September 16, 2019.

  • Sen. Warren reflects on her unsuccessful 2020 presidential bid in her upcoming book, “Persist.”
  • After entering the race to much fanfare, she was unable to translate that enthusiasm to votes.
  • “Maybe I just wasn’t good enough to reassure the voters,” she wrote.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts entered the 2020 presidential race, she didn’t really need a national introduction.

A former professor at Harvard Law School, she was also the architect of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which was started under then-President Barack Obama in 2011 to oversee consumer protection in the financial sector.

After Warren was elected to the Senate from Massachusetts in 2012, defeating then-GOP Sen. Scott Brown, the presidential buzz immediately followed.

When Warren announced her candidacy in February 2019, she was seen as a Democrat who could win progressives and blue-collar Democrats with her populist economic message. After many rural voters abandoned former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during the 2016 presidential election, Warren felt that robust economic plans on tax reform and proposals for tackling student loan debt would resonate with a wide swath of voters.

However, after disappointing showings in Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina, she tried to turn her campaign around on Super Tuesday. It didn’t work.

After Biden unexpectedly won the Massachusetts Democratic primary that day, with Warren securing a third-place finish in her home state, she soon exited the race.

Read more: Here’s how Biden is reshaping gender and reproductive rights with policies that are even more progressive than past Democratic presidents

What happened?

In Warren’s upcoming book, “Persist,” set to be released on May 4, she reflects – quite candidly – on why her campaign failed to launch her into a one-on-one battle with former President Donald Trump for the White House.

“In this moment, against this president, in this field of candidates, maybe I just wasn’t good enough to reassure the voters, to bring along the doubters, to embolden the hopeful,” Warren wrote.

She wrote that the possibility of this notion being true was “painful.”

For Warren, who has kept a somewhat low profile since Biden took office, the book reveals a chapter of her life that had the potential to make her the first female president in US history.

In the book, Warren points to questions about the cost of her health care overhaul as part of her downfall, as well as what she says were the lingering suspicions that plagued high-profile female candidates like 2010 Massachusetts Senate candidate Martha Coakley and Clinton.

“I had to run against the shadows of Martha and Hillary,” she said, suggesting that some voters may have been leery of nominating a woman to take on Trump.

Warren also said that with the dozens of policy proposals that were drafted during the campaign, there was a lot to juggle.

“It can be risky to learn on the run, particularly if some of that learning is happening in public,” she wrote.

While Warren takes time to tackle her loss in the book, as a sitting senator, she still wants to empower her ideas.

“This book is about the fight that lies ahead,” Warren emphasizes on the back of the book.

In the book, she also offers praise for former 2020 competitor Biden, describing him as a “steady, decent man,” as well as Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, whom she describes as “fearless and determined.”

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Pelosi says in new book that Trump’s 2016 victory felt ‘like a mule kicking you in the back over and over again’

Nancy Pelosi
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-California) arrives for an event on Capitol Hill on April 14, 2021.

  • After Hillary Clinton’s loss in 2016, Nancy Pelosi said that Trump’s victory was “stunningly scary.”
  • “How could they elect such a person – who talked that way about women,” she wondered.
  • Trump’s win drove Pelosi to stay in the House and continue her work in Washington.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In 2016, then-Democratic House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California was looking forward to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s ascension to the White House.

In “Madam Speaker: Nancy Pelosi and the Lessons of Power,” an upcoming book about Pelosi’s life written by biographer and USA Today Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page, Pelosi described how Clinton winning the election would have secured hard-fought legislative victories, including the Affordable Care Act.

Pelosi, then 76, saw herself spending time with her nine grandchildren and enjoying her retirement years.

But then Donald Trump won the presidency that November, throwing Pelosi’s plans into chaos.

When Pelosi spoke with then-Rep. Bob Brady of Pennsylvania about Clinton’s performance in the state, he was initially upbeat. But by the end of the night, he called and said the former secretary of state’s path to victory in the Keystone State was no longer realistic.

Clinton needed Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes to win the presidency, and with that state gone, along with narrow losses in the longtime Democratic strongholds of Michigan and Wisconsin, the Trump era would soon begin.

Pelosi expressed that she was “horrified” by Trump’s win and felt “physical” pain, saying it was “like a mule kicking you in the back over and over again.”

Read more: Imagine a 20-car motorcade taking you to dinner. That’s the White House bubble Joe Biden now finds himself living in.

Not only did Trump win, but Republicans retained their House and Senate majorities, leaving Democrats out of power in Congress.

Pelosi, who had led the House Democratic conference since 2003 and served as Speaker from 2007 to 2011, found herself faced with the prospect of another two years in the minority and without a legislative partner in the White House.

She was concerned about the new conservative-oriented direction on everything from healthcare and climate change to education and environmental regulations.

While Pelosi was upset that a woman would not occupy the White House, she thought it was “scary” that Trump could have been elected in the first place.

“That was saddening, but the election of Donald Trump was stunningly scary, and it was justified to be scared,” she said. “How could they elect such a person – who talked that way about women, who was so crude and … to me, creepy.”

Pelosi believed that Trump was “unfit” to sit in the Oval Office, and by the end of that Election night, she knew that her time in leadership would not come to an end, aware of the political turbulence ahead.

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John Boehner calls Trump ‘a guy who’s unemployed’ and ‘has nothing else to do but cause trouble’

John Boehner
Former House Speaker John Boehner.

  • During an interview on ABC’s “The View,” John Boehner called out Trump’s post-presidential behavior.
  • “Here’s a guy who’s unemployed, has nothing else to do but cause trouble,” he said.
  • Boehner expressed disappointment that Trump has misled his supporters about the election results.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former GOP House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio on Monday blasted former President Donald Trump as an “unemployed” individual who is out to “cause trouble” after losing his reelection bid last year.

During an appearance on ABC’s “The View,” Boehner, who is promoting his forthcoming book, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” was asked by co-host Sara Haines when the GOP would have a “wake-up call” regarding the former president’s continued false claims that he won the 2020 presidential election.

At the Republican National Committee’s donor summit in Florida last weekend, Trump reportedly repeated the claim that the election was “stolen” from him.

“Here’s a guy who’s unemployed, has nothing else to do but cause trouble,” Boehner said. “Clearly, it’s obvious to me that he’s not going away.”

After the November general election and even after President Joe Biden was officially declared the winner, the Trump campaign unsuccessfully sought to overturn the election results in a range of swing states.

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

Boehner criticized Trump for continuing to push the false narrative that voter fraud cost him the election – even in the aftermath of the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot prompted by his repeated lies.

“The president abused the loyalty and the trust that voters had placed in him by perpetuating this noise,” he said. “It was really one of the sadder things I’ve seen in the last 40 years in politics.”

When Haines asked Boehner why current Republican officeholders couldn’t be straightforward with Americans about Trump’s rhetoric, the former speaker didn’t have a clear answer.

“I don’t know,” he said. “I’m not in the political world these days. I try to, frankly, stay as far away from it as I can.”

However, Boehner stressed that the party needed to return to its core principles.

“I think what Republicans need to do is act like Republicans,” he said. “I’m a conservative Republican, but I’m not crazy. I believe in fiscal responsibility and a strong national defense. We need to rally the party around what being a Republican means.”

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John Boehner says that Mitch McConnell ‘holds his feelings, thoughts, and emotions in a lockbox’

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Then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, left, and then-House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio stand together at a ceremony on Capitol Hill on February 13, 2015.

  • John Boehner made some revealing statements about his former GOP counterpart, Mitch McConnell.
  • Boehner said that “bystanders are struck silent” when McConnell shows visible feelings or emotions.
  • In a USA Today interview, the former speaker’s penchant for tears was still evident.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When former GOP House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio served in leadership, he often worked with his Senate counterpart, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Both men were from the same political party and even hailed from adjoining states – Boehner was a conservative Midwestern Republican, while McConnell the face of the South’s dominant influence within the party.

However, while promoting his new memoir, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” Boehner made some revealing observations about McConnell.

During an interview with USA Today, the former speaker highlighted McConnell’s intellect and penchant to play the long game, which the minority leader wholly adhered to when installing conservative jurists to the federal bench.

Boehner also said that the Kentucky Republican “holds his feelings, thoughts, and emotions in a lockbox closed so tightly that whenever one of them seeps out, bystanders are struck silent.”

For Boehner, a jovial, backslapping politician who still smokes Camel cigarettes and is known to publicly cry during emotional moments, McConnell’s steely and to-the-point demeanor is quite a contrast.

Even in retirement, Boehner’s sentimental side has not dissipated.

When the former speaker was asked what makes him cry, he was prepared with a response.

“I can get a little teary-eyed,” he said. “Over what? There’s a pretty long list.”

He spoke up a treasured television advertisement for the US Golf Association.

“They had some kid playing by himself, gets a hole-in-one and he’s all upset because there’s nobody there to see it,” he said. “Except the greens superintendent saw it!”

When Boehner began to think about how someone actually did see the young man’s brilliant golf shot, it was enough to set him over the edge.

He had to take out a handkerchief to wipe his eyes.

Boehner’s memoir is set to be released on April 13.

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Harry Reid on former House Speaker John Boehner: ‘I did everything I could to cause him trouble’ but we ‘got a lot done’

John Boehner Harry Reid
Then-House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, left, speaks with then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada on Capitol Hill on December 10, 2014.

  • Former Sen. Harry Reid on Saturday responded to his inclusion in John Boehner’s new memoir.
  • CNN host Jim Acosta made reference to an incident where Boehner cursed Reid out at the White House.
  • Reid recounted that he worked “well” with Boehner and called the former speaker “a great patriot.”
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When former Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada was asked on Saturday about a now-infamous confrontation with former GOP House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio at the White House in 2013, he seemed to express a sense of nostalgia.

During a CNN interview, host Jim Acosta made reference to Boehner’s new memoir, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” where the former speaker recounted that Reid called the House a “dictatorship of the Speaker” during a challenging set of fiscal-cliff negotiations at the White House during then-President Barack Obama’s tenure.

In the memoir, Boehner expressed how infuriated he was with the comment.

“If I were a dictator, do you think I’d let all these members get away with screwing me over all the time?,” he wrote. “Hell no! And Reid, who was a ruthless bastard, knew exactly what I was doing.”

He continued: “So when I saw him at the White House the next day, talking quietly with Mitch McConnell before the meeting, I went over, got in Reid’s face, and said, ‘Do you even listen to all of the s— that comes out of your mouth?’ You can go f— yourself.”

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

When asked for a response by Acosta, Reid said that he “got along well” with the former speaker.

“The deal is this – John Boehner and I got a lot done, but we didn’t mince words,” he said. “He was right. I did everything I could to cause him trouble because I knew he was having a lot of trouble. The more trouble he had in his caucus, the better it was for us, and he knew what I was doing, and I wasn’t at all surprised that he came to me and gave me one of his underhanded blessings.”

Reid, who served in the Senate from 1987 to 2017, also gave an interesting tidbit on why he always conducted business with Boehner in the former speaker’s office.

“We had a deal,” he said. “He would not come to my office. I would always go to his office. I didn’t want anybody smoking in my office, so all of our meetings were in his office. He could smoke to his heart’s content.”

He added: “I have a lot of respect for John Boehner. He, as far as I’m concerned, was a great patriot.”

Boehner’s memoir, where he criticizes leading Republican figures including former President Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, and Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, is set to be released on April 13.

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Former GOP House Speaker John Boehner calls fellow Republican Jim Jordan a ‘political terrorist’

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Former House Speaker John Boehner stands for the pledge of allegiance during a ceremony to unveil a portrait in his honor in the U.S. Capitol on November 19, 2019 in Washington, DC. Boehner served as the 53rd speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 2011 to 2015. (Photo by Alex Edelman/Getty Images)
Former House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during a ceremony to unveil a portrait in his honor at the US Capitol on November 19, 2019.

  • Boehner described several fellow Republicans as “political terrorists,” including Rep. Jim Jordan.
  • “I never saw a guy who spent more time tearing things apart ― never building anything,” he said.
  • In his book, Boehner seemed relieved that he didn’t have to interact with Trump while in office.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former GOP House Speaker John Boehner in an upcoming CBS interview scorches several members of his own party for being “political terrorists,” including fellow Ohioan and Republican Rep. Jim Jordan.

During an episode of “CBS Sunday Morning” set to air this weekend, Boehner criticized what he describes as an outgrowth of political opportunism that led to the deadly January 6 riot at the US Capitol.

Boehner, who represented Ohio’s 8th congressional district from 1991 to 2015 and served as House speaker from 2011 to 2015, is promoting his new memoir, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” which is set to be released on April 13.

When asked by reporter John Dickerson who would fall under his definition of a political terrorist, Jordan’s name immediately sprang up.

“Jim Jordan especially, my colleague from Ohio,” he replied. “I just never saw a guy who spent more time tearing things apart ― never building anything, never putting anything together.”

Jordan, who was first elected to Congress in 2006, has become well-known for his verbal jousting with Democrats on both the Oversight and Judiciary Committees, along with his staunch defense of former President Donald Trump.

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

In the same interview, Boehner went after GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, whom he calls a “jerk” and describes as an attention seeker.

“Perfect symbol, you know, of getting elected, making a lot of noise, draw a lot of attention to yourself, raise a lot of money, which means you’re gonna go make more noise, raise more money – it’s really unfortunate,” he said.

Cruz was roundly criticized by many for challenging the 2020 election results after the Capitol riot, even by moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, and faced calls for his resignation.

When the subject turned to Trump, who was impeached by the House for “incitement of insurrection” for his role in the riot but acquitted by the Senate, Boehner wouldn’t describe Trump as a political terrorist.

“I’m not in office anymore,” he said. “I don’t have to answer all the questions that I used to have to answer, right? And while it isn’t my style, I don’t wanna use a pejorative term like that ― talking about him or anybody else.”

Boehner, who left office a year before Trump was elected, seemed to relish that he didn’t have to deal with the former president as an elected official.

“That was fine by me because I’m not sure I belonged to the Republican Party he created,” Boehner said in his memoir.

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Ted Cruz derides Boehner criticism as ‘drunken, bloviated scorn’ while mocking the former speaker’s penchant for tears

ted cruz filibuster
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

  • Sen. Ted Cruz derided political criticism from John Boehner as “drunken, bloviated scorn.”
  • Boehner slammed Cruz as a “jerk” who likes to “draw a lot of attention” to himself.
  • In February, Boehner went off-script in an audiobook recording, telling Cruz to “go f— yourself.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas on Friday tore into former US House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, labeling criticism from one of the party’s most prominent Republicans as “drunken, bloviated scorn.”

In an interview that will air on “CBS Sunday Morning” this weekend, Boehner, who’s promoting his new memoir, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” lashed into Cruz, describing him as an attention seeker.

“I don’t beat anybody up – it’s not really my style, except for that jerk,” he said. “Perfect symbol, you know, of getting elected, making a lot of noise, draw a lot of attention to yourself, raise a lot of money, which means you’re gonna go make more noise, raise more money – it’s really unfortunate.”

Cruz was ready with a comeback, slamming Boehner as part of the Washington DC political “swamp,” while mocking the former speaker’s penchant for showing emotion in public.

“The Swamp is unhappy,” he tweeted on Friday. “I wear with pride his drunken, bloviated scorn. Please don’t cry.”

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

In February, Cruz hit back at Boehner at the the Conservative Political Action Conference after Axios reported that the former speaker told Cruz to “go f— yourself” after veering off-script from his memoir’s audiobook recording.

“You know yesterday, John Boehner made some news,” Cruz said at the time. “He suggested that I do something that is anatomically impossible. To which my response was: Who’s John Boehner?”

Around that time, Boehner tweeted an image of himself with a glass of wine while recording his audiobook.

“Poured myself a glass of something nice to read my audiobook,” he wrote. “You can blame the wine for the expletives.”

Boehner, who served in the House from 1991 to 2015 and was its speaker from 2011 to 2015, described leading the lower chamber during former President Barack Obama’s tenure as becoming the “mayor” of “Crazytown.”

“Crazytown was populated by jackasses, and media hounds, and some normal citizens as baffled as I was about how we got trapped inside the city walls,” Boehner wrote in his memoir. “Every second of every day since Barack Obama became president I was fighting one bats— idea after another.”

Boehner’s book will be released on April 13.

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