Only a tiny proportion of Peloton customers will return their recalled treadmills despite safety concerns, a new survey suggests

pelo tread
Peloton’s high-tech running machine.

  • Peloton voluntarily recalled its two treadmill models earlier this month.
  • The company said it expected the recall, of about 130,000 machines, to be a $165 million hit to its future revenue.
  • But evidence is mounting that few users plan to return the machines, despite safety concerns.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Peloton recalled around 130,000 of its pricey treadmills earlier this month – but evidence is mounting that, despite safety warnings, many customers have no plans to return the machines.

It issued the recall earlier this month after facing pressure from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to do so. This followed reports that a child died, and several others were injured, while using the treadmills.

Peloton said it expected the voluntary recall of both its $4,295 Tread+ and $2,495 Tread running machines to be a $165 million hit to its future revenue.

In a recent survey of 100 Peloton Tread+ and Tread users published Wednesday, conducted by Wedbush analysts, just 4% said they planned to return the machine, while 8% were undecided.

In recent conversations with Insider, other said they planned to keep the machine. “I am NOT returning it. I love it, and even with an eight-year-old daughter and a dog in my two-bedroom apartment, it’s not going anywhere,” Tread+ owner Peter Shankman wrote in an email to Insider earlier this month.

Read more: Peloton just recalled its treadmill, but customers reported injuries and safety concerns as early as January 2019

Shankman said that the safety instructions were sufficient and that it was up to users to keep their kids or pets away from the machine.

Some users may want to avoid returning the bulky equipment, or leave it sitting unused, taking up space in their home. A spokesperson for Peloton did not respond to Insider’s request for more details on how exactly the returns process works, and how long customers would have to wait for these machines to be collected from their homes.

Others may be comfortable keeping the machine after Peloton added a new password lock feature that it said would improve safety.

Read the original article on Business Insider

What Peloton’s future looks like after its recall on treadmills

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Peloton Treafd

Experts say Peloton will emerge from the treadmill recall with its bottom line intact – even as its delay in issuing a recall exposes larger safety issues

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Some Peloton customers say they have ‘no intention’ of returning recalled treadmills despite a child dying and several others being injured during use

pelo tread
  • Some Peloton treadmill users say they have “no intention” of returning the machines despite potential danger.
  • Peloton recalled both its treadmills following pressure from US regulators after a child died during use.
  • Some Peloton customers say it’s the owner’s responsibility to keep children and pets away from the machine.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

News of Peloton recalling its high-tech treadmills sent shockwaves around the market Wednesday, wiping out $4 billion of its market cap, and leaving customers – who had invested in these pricey machines – wondering what to do next.

In a joint announcement with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Peloton advised its members to stop using these machines immediately and offered two solutions: either return it and apply for a refund or keep it and have it repaired or moved into a safer room away from children and pets.

But some of its loyal customers say they plan to do nothing.

“I am NOT returning it. I love it, and even with an eight-year-old daughter and a dog in my two-bedroom apartment, it’s not going anywhere,” Tread+ owner Peter Shankman wrote in an email to Insider, adding that he has a rigorous safety routine in place.

“I taught my daughter from the second I got it that she was never to go anywhere near it unless I was right there and gave her permission. Not even to stand on it,” he said.

Whenever his $4,295 treadmill is not in use, Shankman removes the safety key (which prevents the machine from moving) and stores this in a place his daughter can’t access.

Read more: Peloton just recalled its treadmill, but customers reported injuries and safety concerns as early as January 2019

Shankman, along with some other Peloton members – who have shared their thoughts in Peloton Facebook members groups and in emails to Insider over the past 24-hours – say that Peloton is not to blame for the injuries or the death of a child that occurred while using its Tread+ machine.

“The instructions couldn’t have been clearer to me when I bought the unit. Basic common sense: It’s a treadmill. It’s designed to move my 220-pound ass,” Shankman told Insider.

He continued: “Who in their right mind would possibly think that a machine like that is OK to leave on with kids or pets around?”

Thousands of accidents involving treadmills occur every year in the US. In 2019, there were 22,500 emergency-room visits related to treadmills, according to CPSC data reported by the Wall Street Journal.

But experts say that the unique design features of Peloton’s Tread+ make it “particularly dangerous” to use. Specifically, the height of the machine’s base off the ground and well as the design of the running belt.

William Wallace, safety policy manager for Consumer Reports, said that the recall is “the right move for consumers.”

“We’re very glad to see Peloton come to its senses, apologize for its mistakes, and offer a full refund,” he wrote in an email to Insider on Wednesday.

Insider’s Bethany Biron spoke with five Peloton users this week who reported issues with the Tread+ dating back as far as January 2019. These customers said that they experienced injuries and malfunctions while using the machine and that Peloton was slow to respond to their complaints. Despite this, some of these users said they would continue to the machine.

Rachel Cone, another avid Tread+ user who bought the machine in February 2020, echoed Peter Shankman’s thoughts. “Honestly, it’s terrible that a tragedy occurred but parents need to be held accountable for supervising their children,” she wrote in an email to Insider. “If a small child burned themselves on the stove would a consumer sue the company? I think not.”

John Mills, who has owned a Tread+ since 2018 and uses it three to four times a week along with his wife and 31-year-old daughter, said that the safety issues flagged by US regulators are concerning him and he’s “eagerly awaiting” hardware and software fixes. Still, he has no intention of returning the treadmill in the meantime, he said.

Read more: Experts say Peloton will emerge from the treadmill recall with its bottom line intact – even as its delay in issuing a recall exposes larger safety issues

For some Peloton users, the decision to return one of these machines is not about safety but about whether the content and classes will be impacted because of these recalls. In an email to Insider on Wednesday, a spokesperson for Peloton confirmed that it will continue to make new content for the treadmill.

Stephanie Andreozzi, who received her Peloton treadmill in March, said she while feels comfortable with the current safety features on the Tread+ and doesn’t have children or pets in her house, she’s still undecided as to whether to return the machine.

“I’m hearing mixed information on how much new content will be available from the peloton. If Peloton isn’t going to continue new classes, we would return,” she said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Peloton will face investors one day after it recalled thousands of treadmills. Here are the top questions executives will face.

Peloton Treafd
  • Peloton recalled its treadmills on Wednesday, following pressure from federal regulators.
  • The company is set to hold its quarterly earnings call Thursday, one day after the recall.
  • Executives are likely to face questions about the long-term financial and reputational impact.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Peloton recalled more than 125,000 treadmills on Wednesday, sending the company’s stock price plummeting.

On Thursday, executives will face questions from analysts and investors who will likely be looking to assess the long-term ramifications of the recall and its impact on Peloton’s bottom line.

CEO John Foley and other leaders will likely be grilled on the $4,295 product’s future, other forthcoming products, and the recall’s impact on Peloton’s reputation in the fitness industry.

Read more: Experts say Peloton will emerge from the treadmill recall with its bottom line intact – even as its delay in issuing a recall exposes larger safety issues

How long will it take to repair the treadmills?

In its notice, Peloton told customers to immediately stop using the product and contact the company for a potential refund. The company also stopped selling the product.

For the users who do not return the product, Peloton pushed a software update that automatically locks the treadmill and requires a four-digit code to unlock for each use.

It is unclear how long it will take Peloton to repair the treadmills and implement new safety practices for new Treads. Customers have until November 2022 to request a full or partial refund, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission said.

What is the new timing for the Tread release in the US?

Before a fatal accident in March and other reported injuries dating back to 2019, Peloton was set to release a slimmer model of its treadmill on May 27. The product was supposed to be a cheaper option and would sell for a little over half the price of the original treadmill or about $2,495.

Since Peloton told users to stop using their treadmills immediately, the company has not commented on its plans to release the newer model, though a new Tread release seems unlikely.

“We expect that it will be delayed by at least a few months (possibly longer) while considerable existing inventory is repaired & Peloton waits for negative PR & recall overhang to subside,” JP Morgan analysts said in a note to clients Wednesday.

Will Peloton continue to sell the Tread+?

In light of its plans to release a cheaper model, investors may question whether Peloton may choose to ditch the more expensive Tread+ entirely.

By doing away with the model, the company could potentially further distance itself from the incidents and recall. According to JP Morgan analysts, the Tread+ will also likely lose much of its revenue to the cheaper Tread.

Will Peloton continue to advertise its treadmill or any other products in the coming months?

In the past, Peloton has been relatively heavy-handed with its advertising campaigns. This year, the company advertised during the Super Bowl and has launched several commercials for its treadmills.

Investors may question whether the company will choose to continue advertising its Tread and Tread+ and whether Peloton might choose to take a step back from the limelight until concerns over its treadmill ease. It could also change its marketing strategy entirely.

“What’s less clear is the impact the Tread recalls will have on N-T Bike & Bike+ sales, and on Peloton’s willingness to market into difficult headlines,” JPMorgan said.

The company has even come under criticism for its ad campaigns in previous years. In 2019, the workout company lost over $1.5 billion in value after its Christmas advertising campaigns were dubbed “sexist and dystopian” on social media.

Will the recall and Peloton’s initial lack of response to the federal investigation impact the company’s future viability?

Prior to the recall, Foley was hesitant to take any steps even in light of the fatal accident. At the time, Foley called CPSC’s warnings about the treadmill “inaccurate and misleading.”

While the CEO has since apologized for the initial response, his actions could impact his credibility and the future reputation of the company.

Customers and investors may be wary of future Peloton products after seeing how the company was slow to recall its treadmill. Hesitancy over the treadmill could also leak into sales Peloton’s famous bike.

Despite the recall, analysts expect Peloton to report another solid quarter of growth, fueled by the pandemic as Americans sought out new ways to exercise outside of the gym. The period ended March 31, prior to the recall. Analysts polled by Bloomberg expect $1.12 billion in revenue, up 113% from 2020, and a loss per share of $0.10.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Peloton plunges 15% after recalling treadmills amid reports of injuries and the death of a child

peloton tread

Peloton Interactive plunged as much as 15% on Wednesday after announcing it will voluntarily recall two versions of its treadmills. The decision comes in cooperation with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission following reports of injuries and one death.

Customers who have purchased either the Tread+ or the Tread treadmill are urged to stop using them and contact Peloton for a full refund, according to a joint statement issued by the company and the CPSC. The Tread+ costs $4,295 while it’s $2,495 for the Tread.

The agency on April 17 warned consumers about the Tread+. At that point, the agency was aware of 39 incidents, as well as one death. The agency on the same day even released a video of a child being sucked under the machine. To date, the accidents tally to more than 70.

The decision comes after Peloton initially pushed back on regulatory warnings regarding the safety of its treadmills.

“Peloton made a mistake in our initial response to the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s request that we recall the Tread+,” Peloton CEO John Foley said In a statement. “We should have engaged more productively with them from the outset. For that, I apologize.”

The agreement between the two parties was borne out of weeks of “intense” negotiation and effort, according to Robert Adler, acting chairman of the CPSC.

Read more: Dave Bujnowski beat 99% of his peers to return 125% last year. The Baillie Gifford investor shares 5 stocks set to benefit from the end of the pandemic and a hyperconnected economy.

Screen Shot 2021 05 05 at 10.18.06 AM
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US stocks close mixed with tech lower as traders weigh economic-recovery data

FILE - In this May 13, 2020, file photo, Ford Motor Co., line workers put together ventilators that the automaker is assembling at the Ford Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. American industry rebounded last month as factories began to reopen for the first time since being shut down by the coronavirus in Aprll. The Federal Reserve said Tuesday, June 16, 2020, that industrial production - including output at factories, mines and utilities - rose 1.4% in May after plummeting a record 12.4% in April and 4.6% in March. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
In this May 13, 2020, file photo, Ford Motor line workers put together ventilators that the automaker is assembling at the Ford Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich.

  • US stocks close mixed as traders weigh economic recovery data against inflationary concerns.
  • Shares of Moderna and Pfizer also slipped after the US said it will support a proposal to waive intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines.
  • Oil prices snapped a two-day winning streak as investors pull back from the recent rally.
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

US stocks close mixed Wednesday with technology leading the losses as traders weigh economic recovery data against inflationary concerns.

The US private sector saw hiring accelerate through April – growing by 742,000 last month – according to ADP’s monthly employment report, as widespread vaccination led the economy to further reopen.

The median estimate from economists surveyed by Bloomberg was for a gain of 873,000 payrolls. The most optimistic estimates pegged job growth at well over 1 million.

“The labor market continues an upward trend of acceleration and growth, posting the strongest reading since September 2020,” Nela Richardson, chief economist at ADP, said in a statement.

“US stocks are rising after solid economic data, calm in the bond market, and as the global economic recovery improves,” Edward Moya, senior market analyst at Oanda, said in a note.

He continued: “The next big catalyst for equities is that the US needs its allies to also win the fight against COVID and that will take time. The gains abroad are greater as the recovery potential in Europe far exceeds what is left for the US.”

President Biden also announced a new goal Tuesday to have 70% of adults in the US at least partially vaccinated by July. This means giving close to 100 million shots over the next 60 days, the president said.

Here’s where US indexes stood at the 4:00 p.m. ET close on Wednesday.

Peloton Interactive plunged as much as 15% after announcing it will voluntarily recall two versions of its treadmills. The decision comes in cooperation with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission following reports of injuries and one death.

Shares of Moderna and Pfizer also slipped after the US said it will support a proposal to waive intellectual property protections for coronavirus vaccines.

“This is a global health crisis, and the extraordinary circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic call for extraordinary measures,” US Trade Representative Katherine Tai said in a statement.

In cryptocurrencies, dogecoin continued its red-hot rally, rising more than 40% to a new all-time high near $0.70. Ether meanwhile is up 350% year to date – hitting a new high of $3,500 on Tuesday – far outpacing the 90% rise of bitcoin.

The 27-year-old co-creator of Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin, who currently holds 333,521 ETH, is now the world’s youngest crypto billionaire as the second-largest cryptocurrency surges to a $400 billion valuation. One analyst said ether will likely hit $40,000.

Oil prices snapped a two-day winning streak as investors pull back from the recent rally. West Texas Intermediate crude slipped 0.49%, to $65.37 per barrel. Brent crude, oil’s international benchmark, fell 0.23%, to $68.72 per barrel.

Gold climbed 0.35%, to $1,784.75 per ounce.

Lumber also topped $1,600 per thousand board feet for the first time ever this week as ongoing homebuilding push continues to drain lumber producers that are already lagging supply.

Stocks related to lumber soared in response, including Weyerhauser and West Fraser Timber.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Peloton fixes bug that reportedly exposed users’ data and account information

peloton bike
  • Peleton workout equipment previously had a bug that allowed users to access private account information.
  • The information included the user’s gender, weight, birthday, age, workout statistics, and more.
  • Peleton confirmed to TechCrunch on Wednesday that the bug has been fixed.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Peloton has confirmed it fixed a bug that exposed users’ private account data, according to TechCrunch.

The bug was first discovered by Jan Masters, a security researcher at Pen Test Partners, TechCrunch reported.

Masters found the breach by learning he could make unauthenticated requests to access someone’s data through Peloton’s programming interface. The bug exposed users’ age, location, workout statistics, and weight.

The researcher told TechCrunch that he reported the flaw on January 20, but the issue was only confirmed to be fixed after Peloton was contacted by TechCrunch.

The security flaws discovered in Peleton’s equipment demonstrate the reasons that cybersecurity experts were wary of reports that President Joe Biden might bring his Peleton bike to the White House: the additional cameras, sensors, and microphones present in the device pose potential national security risks if hacked into and personal data is leaked.

The “Security and Compliance” page of Peleton’s website notes that despite company efforts, security vulnerabilities may still exist in Peleton’s products.

“No matter how much effort we put into system security, there can still be vulnerabilities present,” the company website says.

News of the data bug came just before Peloton recalled its Tread+ running machine Wednesday amid reports that a child died and others were injured while it was operating. The recall sent Peleton’s stock into a nosedive, falling more than 13% as of Wednesday afternoon.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Peloton has recalled its Tread+ running machine. There are 2 ways it’s different from other treadmills and potentially more dangerous, according to US regulators.

Peloton Tread+.
Peloton’s $4,295 Tread+.

  • Peloton recalled its treadmills on Wednesday amid pressure from US regulators to do so.
  • The recall comes after a child died and others were injured while using its $4,295 Tread+ machine.
  • Regulators said they were examining potential safety risks with the design of the machine’s base and running belt.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Peloton issued a voluntary recall of its two treadmills on Wednesday after coming under intense scrutiny from US regulators to do so.

Regulators warned customers in April to stop using its $4,295 Tread+ treadmill, deeming it unsafe after it was reported that a child had died and others were injured while it was in use.

Peloton’s CEO initially denied that its Tread+ running machine has any safety issues and said the company would not recall the product. A spokesperson reiterated this in an email to Insider in April:

“A recall has never been warranted,” the spokesperson said. “The Peloton Tread+ is safe when operated as directed and in accordance with the warnings and safety instructions.”

On Wednesday, Peloton CEO John Foley said that the company had “made a mistake” in its initial response and apologized.

According the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, the independent federal agency that issued the warning about the treadmill, some of the machine’s design features make it “particularly dangerous” to use. Specifically, the agency highlighted potential problems with the height of machine’s base off the ground and well as the design of the running belt.

A spokesperson for CPSC previously told Insider that the agency was examining how the Tread+ differed from other treadmills on the market.

“We have had injuries reported concerning other treadmills but to date, we are unaware of this hazard pattern involving other treadmills. For example, many injuries involve sudden acceleration of the treadmill, which is not the issue here,” the spokesperson said.

Thousands of accidents involving treadmills happen every year in the US. In 2019, there were 22,500 emergency-room visits related to treadmills, according to CPSC data reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Why is the Tread+ different from any other treadmill?

The CPSC shared a video alongside its warning about the Tread+ to demonstrate its safety concerns.

The footage showed two children playing, apparently unsupervised, on a Peloton Tread+. One of the children, who was playing with a ball at the rear of the machine, was sucked underneath while the treadmill’s belt was moving. The child was eventually able to wriggle free.

Regulators have highlighted the space between the ground and the machine’s base as potentially posing a safety risk. The following photograph shows the size of the gap between the base of the machine and the floor, which is apparently enough space for a child to be pulled underneath, according to the footage released by the CPSC.

Tread+
The CPSC was investigating the height of the machine.

Regulators were also examining the design of the running belt. While most running machines on the market have a flat and continuous running belt, the Tread+ belt is made up of 59 slats that are “mounted on a ball bearing rail system,” according to Peloton.

The design is meant to make the running experience easier on the knees and legs as the slats are more shock-absorbent, according to Peloton.

Peloton Tread+
Peloton’s running belt is made up of 59 slats, which looks like caterpillar tracks on a tank.

Peloton customers have been debating the safety of the Tread+ in private Facebook members’ groups online in recent days. Some users suggested that the lack of a “safety bar” at the rear of the machine could be the issue.

Richard Moon, director of fitness consultancy agency Motive8, which designs and installs gyms and fitness centers, and an expert in the sector, told Insider that “safety bars” are not standard on all machines. Motive8 does not currently work with Peloton.

Moon said that he felt the best way to prevent accidents from happening would be to have a safety feature in the software that forces the machine to cut out if it feels a resistance to the point that it stops the belt from running. This could, therefore, help to prevent objects from being dragged underneath.

Peloton’s CEO John Foley previously said in a letter to Tread+ members that the company would update the software to add an access code to the machine to prevent it from being used when the safety key hasn’t been removed.

William Wallace, safety policy manager for Consumer Reports, said that the recall is “the right move for consumers.”

“As a safety advocate and close observer of the CPSC, I can say: it’s highly likely Peloton changed course because the CPSC stood its ground on behalf of consumers. The agency made a clear and compelling case for why the Tread+ puts people at risk, and people seemed to recognize that Peloton wasn’t doing all it could to keep people safe and make its customers whole.

“We’re very glad to see Peloton come to its senses, apologize for its mistakes, and offer a full refund,” he wrote in an email to Insider on Wednesday.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Peloton is recalling all its treadmills after reports of injuries and one death

A Peloton Tread+.
A Peloton Tread+.

  • Peloton is recalling all its treadmills after a child died in an accident and users reported injuries.
  • Shares of the company fell sharply in trading Wednesday after the announcement.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Peloton is recalling all its treadmills after one child died in an accident with one and users reported injuries, the company said in a joint statement with the Consumer Product Safety Commission on Wednesday.

Federal regulators pressured the company last month to recall its $4,295 Tread+ treadmill after the product fatally injured a child in March.

Some customers reported injuries and malfunctions with the treadmill as early as 2019, Insider previously reported.

Read more: Some Peloton customers reported treadmill malfunctions, injuries, and safety concerns as early as 2019 – and said Peloton’s response was sluggish

“I want to be clear, Peloton made a mistake in our initial response to the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s request that we recall the Tread+,” CEO John Foley said in the release. “We should have engaged more productively with them from the outset. For that, I apologize.”

Shares of the fitness company, known for its bike, treadmill, and standalone subscription models, fell as much as 7% in trading following the announcement.

Peloton instructed customers to immediately stop using the treadmill and contact the company for a full refund or “other qualified remedy,” the statement said. Peloton has also stopped the sale and distribution of the Tread+.

“The agreement between CPSC and Peloton is the result of weeks of intense negotiation and effort, culminating in a cooperative agreement that I believe serves the best interests of Peloton and of consumers,” Robert S. Adler, acting chairman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. “Today we have taken steps to prevent further harm from these two products.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Verizon’s data dreams, denied

Hi and welcome to the Insider Advertising newsletter, where we break down the big news in advertising and media news, including:

Jitters inside Verizon Media Group;

JetBlue picks a new agency;

Peloton malfunctions.

First, we’re seeking nominations for the world’s most innovative CMOs. Submit here.

And, if you got this email forwarded, sign up for your own here.


FILE PHOTO: A photo illustration shows a Yahoo logo on a smartphone in front of a displayed cyber code and keyboard on December 15, 2016. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
FILE PHOTO: A photo illustration shows a Yahoo logo on smartphone in front of a displayed cyber code and keyboard

Verizon’s privacy problem

Privacy concerns are casting a big shadow over the ad world. It’s top of mind for every advertiser with Apple now limiting access to user data. It’s one of the big presenter buzzwords at this week’s IAB NewFronts, digital media’s big annual showcase.

And it’s loomed over Verizon, which just sold off its media and adtech properties, ending a years-long effort to stitch together its user data with content and tech to take on Google and Facebook for digital advertising.

  • Advertisers expressed frustration way back that Verizon wasn’t delivering on its promise to marry data and content (and they themselves were nervous about the approach backfiring in light of privacy concerns).
  • Verizon also lost its biggest champion of the vision, Tim Armstrong, and ended up writing down the value of its media properties and abandoning its streaming video service Go90.
  • Ultimately, it never dented Facebook and Google’s dominance – Verizon captures just 1% of the digital ad market.
  • “The whole premise was flawed – in the long term you can’t use consumer data without the perception of violating consumer data,” Brian Weiser, global president of business intelligence at WPP’s GroupM, told Insider. “The end of this effort was always very clear.”

It’s not been a great time for other companies that bet big on adtech.


JetBlue Airways Airbus A321neo
JetBlue Airways Airbus A321neo’s with new Mint business class.

JetBlue restarts its engines

JetBlue picked a new Omnicom ad agency as it seeks to cut costs and convince pandemic-weary consumers to return to the skies.

JetBlue is known for its unconventional ads to stand out as a lower-priced alternative. It offered customers discounts for stealing its own bus stop ads or sitting on a flight with a crying baby, for one.

But these are different times, and ones that will likely call for a decidedly different approach to its advertising.

Read the rest: JetBlue hired a new ad agency as it looks to rebrand itself in the pandemic


Peloton Tread+.
Peloton Tread+.

Peloton malfunctions

Peloton is facing backlash after reports that its accidents involving the Tread+ led to 38 injuries and one child’s death.

Bethany Biron spoke with 5 Peloton customers who experienced Tread+ issues dating back to January 2019. From her story:

Cary Kelly, a seasoned marathon runner, says she lost her footing two minutes into a workout on her Peloton Tread+ in May 2019.

When she fell, she says she landed facedown on the treadmill. According to Kelly, the machine then propelled her prone body backward so forcefully her legs broke through the wall. Unable to move, she says she remained stuck in this position as the treadmill belt continued moving beneath her, tearing into her skin on her face and neck.

“It seemed like a million minutes, like I was there forever,” Kelly told Insider.

By the time Kelly was able to extract herself, she says her body was covered in burns and her legs riddled with bone fractures, confirmed by X-ray scans after the accident. Kelly says the injuries made it difficult for her to walk and impossible for her to run for months.

Read the rest here: Some Peloton customers reported treadmill malfunctions, injuries, and safety concerns as early as 2019 – and said Peloton’s response was sluggish


Other stories we’re reading:

That’s it for today. Thanks for reading, and see you next week!

– Lucia

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