Pelosi ordered flags to be flown at half-staff after a Capitol Police officer died following car-ramming incident

US Capitol
The U.S. Capitol is seen past the Washington Monument as a flock of Geese fly over the National Mall on President’s Day, February 15, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has ordered flags to be flown at half-staff at the US Capitol on Friday.
  • A US Capitol Police officer died after an incident where a man rammed two officers with a car at a security barrier.
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has ordered flags to be flown at half-staff at the US Capitol on Friday. A US Capitol Police officer died after an incident where a man rammed two officers with a car at a security barrier.

At a press conference on Friday, acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman said that a Capitol Police officer died and another was injured after someone rammed a car into a barricade outside the US Capitol building on Friday.

According to Pittman, the suspect “exited the car with a knife in hand” and lunged at the officers. Pittman said that the suspect did not comply with a verbal command, and the officers opened fire, killing the suspect, she added.

The Capitol went into lockdown earlier Friday after Capitol Police texted an alert telling people in the complex to stay indoors because of an “external security threat.” Congress is in recess and neither the House nor the Senate are in session.

At the press conference, hours after the attack, Pittman said the security threat was “neutralized.”

This story is breaking. Check back for updates.

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Republicans take aim at billions set aside in stimulus bill for infrastructure and transport projects, including Amtrak, BART, and a bridge to Canada

AP President Joe Biden Amtrak Train Boarding
President Joe Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, board an Amtrak train during the 2020 presidential campaign.

  • The $1.9 trillion stimulus plan passed by the House included funding for Amtrak and BART.
  •  About $1.5 billion would go to the Amtrak train system, Biden’s favored mode of transport. 
  • Rep. Kevin McCarthy and other Republican lawmakers said some of the infrastructure spending was pork.
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Billions from the $1.9 trillion stimulus bill passed by House lawmakers on Friday would go to transportation and infrastructure projects, including extending a subway in Silicon Valley, operating a bridge to Canada, and maintaining the nation’s railway system. 

In total, more than $40 billion would go to infrastructure and transportation projects, including about $30 billion to public transit, and about $8 billion to airports. Rep. Kevin McCarthy and other Republican lawmakers said some of that infrastructure spending was pork, calling attention to projects in the bill in areas represented by high-profile Democrats. 

“This bill is actually too costly, too corrupt, and too liberal,” McCarthy told Fox News

The 591-page bill passed by the House on Friday included $1.5 million for operations and maintenance for the Seaway International Bridge, which connects New York to Canada. In a statement, Rep. Daniel Webster, of Florida, said the bridge funding was a “pet project” of Senator Chuck Schumer, majority leader, who represents New York. 

Politifact, the fact-checking group at The Poynter Institute, said the Seaway funding had originally been requested by President Donald Trump’s administration in May 2020. 

Also in the House bill was more than $100 million for an extension of the Bay Area Rapid Transit subway system in San Jose. The money would go toward connecting the BART subway line to Mineta San Jose International Airport, a “long-planned” route extension, according to The San Francisco Chronicle

 

Sen. Marsha Blackburn, a Republican, called the plan “Pelosi’s Subway,” although the construction would happen just south of Pelosi’s district, as The San Jose Mercury News reported.  

The bill also had more than $1.5 billion for Amtrak, President Joe Biden’s favorite mode of transportation. That funding included about $820 million for the Northeast Corridor, about $680 million for the national rail network, and about $166 million for long-distance service restoration and employee recalls, according to the text of the bill. 

Rep. Ben Cline added the Amtrak spending to his list of “the most egregious provisions unrelated to COVID” in the stimulus bill. 

In a statement, Cline said: “Not only is this legislation riddled with wasteful spending unrelated to COVID and bailouts for blue states like New York and California, but with more than $1 trillion in previously authorized coronavirus funds still unspent, it is premature.” 

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Pelosi signs impeachment articles against Trump for ‘incitement of insurrection,’ making Trump the first president to be impeached twice

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., holds the article of impeachment against President Donald Trump after signing it, in an engrossment ceremony before transmission to the Senate for trial on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021.

  • Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi formally signed an article of impeachment against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting an insurrection. 
  • Ten House Republicans voted to impeach Trump, highlighting growing support among the GOP to hold the president accountable.
  • “I have not made a final decision on how I will vote and I intend to listen to the legal arguments when they are presented to the Senate,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wrote on Wednesday.
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Speaking at the lectern stolen by a rioter during the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi formally signed an article of impeachment against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting the insurrection.

Trump has become the first president to be impeached twice.

After introducing Lead Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin and impeachment managers Reps. Diana DeGette, David Cicilline, Joaquin Castro, Eric Swalwell, Ted Lieu, Stacey Plaskett, Joe Neguse, and Madeleine Dean, Pelosi said they, “did not think they would have this responsibility a week ago.”

“No one is above the law and President Donald Trump is a clear and present danger to this country. We honored our oath of office to protect and defend the constitution,” Pelosi said.

“And now I sadly, heartbroken over what this means to the country, over a president who incited insurrection, will sign the article of impeachment,” Pelosi said, symbolically signing the article.

Pelosi and the impeachment managers left the room without taking questions from the press, including from one reporter in the pool who asked for her thoughts on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s decision to delay the impeachment trial until after President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration.

On Wednesday, the House voted 232 to 197 to impeach Trump, and the resolution will now be taken up by the Senate, where Trump can be convicted for his actions and barred from running for public office in the future. 

“I have not made a final decision on how I will vote and I intend to listen to the legal arguments when they are presented to the Senate,” McConnell wrote on Wednesday.

Ten House Republicans voted to impeach Trump, highlighting growing support among the GOP to potentially hold the President accountable.

McConnell also said that lawmakers should spend the next week “completely focused on facilitating a safe inauguration and an orderly transfer of power.” He insinuated that Trump’s Senate trial would realistically have to begin after Biden’s inauguration- a timeline when Democrats will control the senate-given the timelines of past impeachment trials in the Senate.

In a video statement released Wednesday after being impeached for the second time, Trump made no mention of the impeachment.

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Pelosi says House will preserve every option ‘including the 25th Amendment, a motion to impeach or a privileged resolution for impeachment’

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speak after a press conference on Capitol Hill on December 20, 2020 in Washington, DC.

In a new statement foll lowing a Democratic caucus call, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has instructed the Rules Committee to be prepared to move forward with 25th Amendment proceedings, or motions for President Donald Trump’s impeachment.

The move to impeach or remove Trump has gained considerable momentum in Washington, DC, after a riotous mob of Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol, where representatives were gathered to certify the President-elect Joe Biden’s election win.

Democratic House leaders are looking to vote on articles of impeachment as early as Monday, according to Rep. Katherine Clark. Vice President Mike Pence’s advisors told Insider that Pence would oppose 25th Amendment legislation, and in a speech today, Biden said the decision to impeach Trump would lie with Congress.

Pelosi’s statement expanded on the fast-moving impeachment plans, stating that, “Today, the House Democratic Caucus had an hours-long conversation that was sad, moving and patriotic. It was a conversation unlike any other, because it followed an action unlike any other.”

The statement added that House members “hope” that the President immediately resigns, but earlier today a statement from the White House press secretary said that there was a zero percent chance Trump would resign, and added that impeachment would be “politically motivated,” saying that it “will only serve to further divide our great country.”

“I have instructed the Rules Committee to be prepared to move forward with Congressman Jamie Raskin’s 25th Amendment legislation and a motion for impeachment,” Pelosi’s statement said. “Accordingly, the House will preserve every option – including the 25th Amendment, a motion to impeach or a privileged resolution for impeachment.”

Earlier Friday, three Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee circulated draft articles of impeachment. Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Jamie Raskin of Maryland, and Ted Lieu of California drafted the articles, first obtained by CNN.

The draft notably included a clause that would prohibit Trump from seeking public office again in the future.

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No mask, no mic: Pelosi installs new rule requiring masks for lawmakers speaking on House floor and withdrawing recognition from those who speak without a mask

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on November 20, 2020.

  • On Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that members would be required to keep their mask on while addressing the floor.
  • A July mandate applied to the chamber but did not explicitly extend to the house floor. 
  • The mandate comes as the US death toll from COVID-19 has surpassed 300,000, and as 15 members of the House and Senate have tested positive for COVID-19 in the last month.
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As the US passed 300,000 deaths from COVID-19, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi expanded the House of Representatives floor mask requirement on Tuesday. Pelosi’s move means that House members will need to wear masks while speaking on the House floor, as they have been required to do when speaking with the media in the chambers.

“Masks will now be required at all times in the hall of the House without exception,” Pelosi said at a House session on Tuesday. “Members will not be recognized unless they are wearing a mask and recognition will be withdrawn if they remove the mask while speaking.”

Tuesday’s move by Pelosi follows a directive her office issued in July requiring masks on the House floor, given an earlier refusal among many House Republicans to wear them. 

Initially, mask compliance was relatively respected on the floor, but Pelosi has tightened the requirements after the spread of COVID-19 has increased among representatives in the House and Senate.

At least 36 House and Senate members have tested positive since the start of the pandemic, and fifteen of those positive cases have emerged in the last month as the pandemic worsens.

Rep.-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene responded to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s announcement on Twitter, calling the mandate “an oppressive violation of my rights.” 

Pelosi has also spoken favorably about the incoming administration’s plans for a 100-day mask mandate to help curb the pandemic.

In early December, the Capitol’s Attending Physician Brian Monahan urged everyone to wear surgical masks “at any time you are in the company of another person, inside or outside,” and also called on representatives to not attend receptions and dinners during the holidays.

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