The 10 best places to shop for women’s pajamas in 2021

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Summersalt LEAD IMAGE
  • A cozy set of pajamas can be the difference between a good and bad night’s sleep.
  • We’ve tested dozens of pairs of pajamas from multiple brands – these are the best.
  • If you’re a warm sleeper, check out our guide to the best cooling pajamas.

Some people love to curl up in bed wearing a worn-out tee and the same softball sweatpants they’ve been wearing since high school. And to those people I say this: Wear whatever makes you comfortable! But if you’re ready to upgrade, there have never been more brands creating gorgeous pajama sets and mix-and-match pieces, so you can inject a little luxury into your bedtime routine.

We’ve tested multiple pairs of pajamas from dozens of brands, including cooling options, silk options, and everything in between. Ahead, we’ve rounded up the best places to buy pajamas, whether it’s a cozy set or pieces you can mix-and-match. And while the majority of the picks on this list are identified as “pajamas for women,” we believe that folks should wear whatever style of loungewear they’re most comfortable in – regardless of how the industry chooses to gender the pieces. If you’re looking for men’s sizing, though, check out our guide to the best pajamas for men.

Here are the best places to buy pajamas for women in 2021:

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

ThirdLove

ThirdLove Pajamas

Although the brand is known for its bras, ThirdLove carries some of the comfiest pjs we’ve ever worn. The standout is the brand’s washable silk — a brushed silk that you can toss in your washer. The fabric is used in a shorts and tank set, as well as a sleep tee and a blouse and pant set. It feels luxurious without being fussy, and the silk keeps you nice and cool all night long.

Not into silk? You can’t go wrong with the brand’s other styles, including its WonderKnit collection, which features airy modal cotton that is lightweight, breezy, and super cozy.

What to buy: 

WonderKnit™ Pajama Tee (small)WonderKnit™ Pajama Short (small)Washable Silk Sleep Tee (small)
MeUndies

MeUndies Pajamas

Another underwear brand that also makes fantastic sleepwear, MeUndies has the market cornered on easy, unisex basics. It makes a single style of pajama set for both men and women  — a classic button-down with a collar and drawstring pants. MeUndies also utilizes a lot of fun, punch colors and patterns for its pajamas, but also has a wide variety of solid colors, too.

If you’re not into the matching set, MeUndies also has tops and bottoms that you can mix and match, as well as lounge rompers and dresses that are so cozy, you’ll want to sleep in them, too. 

What to buy:

Women’s Lounge Pant (small)Women’s Modal Jogger (small)Women’s Modal PJ Set (small)

 

Quince

Quince Pajamas

Quince makes some of our favorite cashmere sweaters, but don’t, well, sleep on its sleepwear. The brand has a line of gorgeous washable silk pajamas that will add a little luxury to your evening routine. Senior editor Maria Del Russo swears by the brand’s button-up and pants set, thanks to how roomy the trousers are. “They have a slit up the side that makes them much more comfortable to sleep in,” she says. “I don’t feel like my legs get tangled at night.”

If you’re more into shorts, Quince has those, too, along with a sleeveless tank. You can mix and match these separates to find the perfect match. And since they’re made of washable silk, you can just toss ’em in the laundry when they’re ready to get clean — no dry clean bill required. 

What to buy:

Silk Tee & Shorts Pajama Set (small)Silk Tank & Shorts Pajama Set (small)Silk Tee & Shorts Pajama Set (small)

 

J. Crew

JCrew Lifestyle Image

J.Crew’s pajamas are reminiscent of the brand’s aesthetic — preppy, yet accessible. The brand’s Dreamy Cotton Pajamas are the popular style that customers reach for time and time again, and it’s easy to see why. Made of soft cotton, the set is seriously cozy and warm, but lightweight enough to avoid the dreaded night sweats.

Aside from the Dreamy Cotton Pajamas, J. Crew offers up vintage-inspired silhouettes, as well as mix-and-match basics. The brand also provides sweet nightgowns for folks who like to have their legs free while they snooze. And whether you love a bright, fun print or a simple solid hue, you’ll be able to find a style that suits you.

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
Aerie

Aerie Lifestyle Image

Aerie’s Real Soft pajamas earned a spot in our guide to best cooling pajamas for good reason. The fabric blend of viscose, cotton, and elastin allow air to flow while you sleep, so you can avoid the dreaded night sweats. And you can mix and match different sleeve and pant lengths to get the pairing that you prefer. 

But Aerie’s pajamas aren’t just about utility. The brand does patterns adorably, from seersucker to florals. And if you prefer a nightgown over pants, Aerie’s got you covered there, too. Just note that the sizing tends to run large, which can be great for those who prefer a breezier silhouette. But you might want to size down if you prefer something true-to-size. 

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
Papinelle

Papinelle Lifestyle Image

If you’re ready to add a little luxury to your pajama collection, then Papinelle is a great first stop. The brand offers a wide selection of pajama styles, from matching sets to stand-alone pieces in a range of elegant cuts. The Papinelle Classic Crop Pajamas is a gorgeous navy set with short sleeves and cropped pants that is cute enough to wear outside of your bedroom. Plus, its silk/cotton blend is airy and comfortable enough for warm sleepers to enjoy. 

The brand also boasts washable silk, which is great for those who want the feel of silk but not the temperament, and organic cotton. Its slips, nightgowns, and short sets are equally adorable, and come in a wide range of colors and patterns. But if you’re someone who appreciates more simple styles in their sleepwear, the perfectly oversized Washable Silk Pajamas might be a great fit for you. The one drawback? Papinelle’s pajamas don’t have extended sizing, which is something we hope the brand rectifies in the future. 

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
Jamby’s

Jamby's Lifestyle Image

You know those old boxer shorts and tees you typically toss on to sleep in? They just got a major upgrade. Jambys are gender-inclusive boxer-style shorts that have pockets — and are made of the softest and breathable modal French terry. The matching JamTees, which are what the brand calls the matching tops, have a touch of stretch, too, so you don’t feel constricted while you snooze.

It’s the details that make Jambys so great. The tee has a small, two-inch slit on both side seams, so you can sit without the shirt feeling constricting. And the shorts are swingy and breathable, so they won’t get tangled between your legs. More into longer pants and tops? Jamby’s also has a pair of joggers and a hoodie for you to get cozy with.

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
L.L. Bean

L.L. Bean Lifestyle Image

If your main goal of pajamas is to be as cozy as possible, look no further than L.L. Bean. Case-in-point: The Cozy PJ set. Made from 100% breathable, soft cotton, they are cut to fit well without being  baggy. They keep you cozily warm without making you overheat.

If those aren’t warm enough for you, L.L. Bean is also home to the softest flannel pajamas you could ever slip into. They’re made of high-quality, Portugeuse cotton flannel that will keep you incredibly toasty. And if you’re not into sets, L.L. Bean has a lot of pieces you can shop à la carte.  You may not want to wear them outside of the bedroom, but they accomplish what a lot of folks want pajamas to accomplish — they’re warm and comfortable, which will help you snooze much easier. 

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
Summersalt

Summersalt Lifestyle Image

Just like the brand’s swimwear styles, Summersalt’s sleepwear choices are punchy and fun. The Cloud 9 Silky PJ Set is a perfect example of that. It’s a lightweight silk set in a bright, bold stripe pattern and wide cuffs on the arms and legs. Its swingy silhouette would look just as good with a pair of sneakers as it does with your favorite pair of slippers. And the silky fabric is instantly cooling — ideal for the toasty sleepers of the world.

But even Summersalt’s more minimal pajama sets have gorgeous details that make them extra special. The All Day All Night Pajamas are incredibly soft and supple, and the pajama bottoms taper so they don’t get tangled in your legs. The neckline and sleeves have a delicate trim, and the drawstring waist is actually a velvet ribbon. Summersalt’s range of styles ensures that there’s something for everyone, whether you love a matching shorts set or a dainty nightgown. 

Check out our full review on the Cloud 9 SIlky PJ Set. 

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)
Stripe & Stare

Stripe & Stare Lifestyle Image

Not everyone loves to sleep in matching shirt-and-pant sets. Some of us love to snooze in our underwear and a tank — and nothing else. For those pajama minimalists, there’s Stripe & Stare. The brand has a wide range of matching Vest & Knicker sets, which is British slang for a tank top and underwear. They are soft, stretchy, and lightweight, making them perfect for snoozing.

But if you are into a “normal” pair of pajamas, Stripe & Stare delivers there, too. The brand has long pants that you can buy on their own, as well as matching sets in darling patterns. What’s more? The Stripe & Stare is focused on sustainability and creates its sleepwear with a fabric made out of ethically sourced cellulose or wood fiber, so you can feel good about wearing them. 

What to buy:

Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)Product Card (small)

Read the original article on Business Insider

We’re living in the golden age of pajamas

GettyImages 992250636
Caroline Daur in printed pajamas during Paris Fashion Week Haute Couture Fall Winter 2018/2019.

  • If you splurged on a matching pajama set for the first time over the last year, you’re not alone.
  • Those fortunate enough to maintain an income shifted “scheduled spend” from normal routines to indulgences.
  • People also satisfied their “skin hunger” with silks, satins, plushes, and Peruvian cottons.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In March 2020, Vanessa Diaz was supposed to be in Mexico getting married. Instead she was quarantined in her Los Angeles apartment with her fiance and their chihuahua/pug mix, Raisin Bran. But she had just splashed out on a new set of pajamas she was planning to wear on her wedding weekend, and with no reason to leave the house she started wearing them more – like, a lot more.

Soon, Raisin Bran had his own set, too.

Diaz didn’t stop there, deciding to treat herself when she had to postpone her nuptials. Since she chose a lower-price-point Target set for $22 and kept her job in PR, Diaz was able to splurge on more sets, and over the course of a year she spent more than $100 on new pajamas. She said she’d never bought this much sleepwear before.

Prior to the pandemic, Diaz said, her leisure clothes consisted of oversized T-shirts. On the subject of pajamas, she said, “I just thought it was kind of like an unnecessary, luxury purchase, you know?”

Yes, we all know. Last April, PJ sales spiked 143% compared to March, launching an intimates-fueled year of quarantine. And in the year leading up to January 2021, market research firm NPD Group told Insider, pajamas priced at $50 or more grew at triple the rate of the total pajama market. In 2019, the global industry was worth more than $10 million, and it’s projected to reach more than $18 million by 2027.

Even the ultrawealthy got in on the action, fueling a boom in $1,000 pajama sets for the 1%.

The durability of this golden age for modern pajamas may even be a part of the new normal as the world reopens. That will depend on how long “skin hunger” and disruptions of “scheduled spend” continue to change the shape of the economy.

A post shared by Raisin Bran The Dog (@raisinbranthedog)

From unnecessary luxury, to comfort and self-care

When Ashley Merrill founded the pajama brand Lunya in 2014, she said her biggest task was convincing people to pay nearly $200 for something to wear around the house.

“They’re very comfortable spending $250 on a cocktail dress, despite the fact that they’ll maybe wear it once or twice, and very uncomfortable with the idea of spending $200 bucks on a sleep set which they will probably wear 197 out of 365 days a year,” she said.

That changed in a big way in 2020, as pajamas took the place of office clothes, red carpet glam, and streetwear. Those in the $50-to-$200 range from brands like Lunya, Eberjay, and Lake brought luxury to middle-class bedrooms, and sub-$50 sets from the likes of Target and Marshalls also served as a self-care indulgence for many in quarantine.

The market has shifted, Merrill said. Her brand, which has historically sold its washable silk sets in solid, neutral colors, is launching its first pattern. Merrill said she believes people have proven they’re willing to splurge on at-home clothes and are ready for a little more distinctive.

“We’re playing with some things that are a little more special, a little novelty, because we’re realizing, people are ready,” she said. “They now get the value of what it would mean to have something that they feel great in around the home.”

We’re suffering from ‘skin hunger’

In the last three months of 2020, searches peaked for pajamas on the shopping app Liketoknow.it, with over 200,000 unique queries for the term. A spokesperson for the company said shoppers are on the hunt for “silk pajamas,” “pajama sets,” and “satin pajamas” – all of which had triple-digit month-over-month growth last year and still sit in the top searches today.

These fabrics satisfy what Lorna Hall of London-based trend forecasting firm WGSN calls “skin hunger.”

“Many of us are starved of touch,” Hall said, “so tactile fabrications become really important, because they sort of mimic touch.” She said silks, satins, and plushes are examples of fabrics that satisfy this need.

The spokesperson for Liketoknow.it separately agreed with Hall. “Our consumers are very much still in the cozy mindset, with search data for things like loungewear, matching sets, nap dress, and home bedding all trending since the start of lockdown last year,” the spokesperson said.

Anne Read Lattimore and Cassandra Cannon, the cofounders of pajama brand Lake, said their most popular product had a blowout 2020. They sold 38,816 Peruvian pima cotton short sets, contributing to a 136% year-over-year increase in revenue. Lunya, which Hall credits with bringing washable silk to the masses, claims it has doubled revenue every year since launching in 2014, but declined to share exact figures.

The pandemic disrupted our ‘scheduled spend’

Among a certain set of customers, Hall told Insider, the pajama splurge could be the result of “lots of cash, nowhere to go.”

“The luxury pajama really fulfills a way to spend that makes sense, because you can wear them straight away, which, with a lot of apparel at the moment, you just can’t,” Hall said. “And you don’t have the event to wear something luxury and decadent to, because those events really don’t exist.”

Self-care items like pajamas took the place of what Hall calls “scheduled spend” or the purchases people regularly made in their pre-pandemic routine, like coffee, commuter fare, and lunches out. As routines changed, so did our regularly scheduled budgets. After all, Hall said, “bedtime is a thing that comes around every day, and lounging around in the house certainly is like a ubiquitous state for many of us.”

Plus, as Paris Fashion Week demonstrated, it’s no longer just about bedtime. Designers brought pajama-inspired looks to the catwalks this year, Hall said. “With pajama dressing and luxury nightwear, there’s a real crossover at the moment on the catwalks,” she said, describing Jil Sanders’ slip dress as “ostensibly going-out wear, but it’s a slip dress that could also be worn as a night dress, or is related to the night dress in terms of its shape.” In addition, Fendi’s wide-legged pants and intimates-inspired dresses fall in this category of “silky, satin-y, easy-to-wear, pajama-type wear as well.”

Hall said she believes the pajama boom will stick around post-pandemic, bolstered by designers’ pajama-inspired going-out wear. “Once you’ve treated yourself to something that’s of a certain fabric and quality level, it’s quite hard to go back when you’ve had the luxury sleep item.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

The hottest fashion of the pandemic is the pajama set

GettyImages 992250636
Caroline Daur in printed pajamas during Paris Fashion Week Haute Couture Fall Winter 2018/2019.

  • If you splurged on a matching pajama set for the first time over the last year, you’re not alone.
  • Those fortunate enough to maintain an income shifted “scheduled spend” from normal routines to indulgences.
  • People also satisfied their “skin hunger” with silks, satins, plushes, and Peruvian cottons.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In March 2020, Vanessa Diaz was supposed to be in Mexico getting married. Instead she was quarantined in her Los Angeles apartment with her fiance and their chihuahua/pug mix, Raisin Bran. But she had just splashed out on a new set of pajamas she was planning to wear on her wedding weekend, and with no reason to leave the house she started wearing them more – like, a lot more.

Soon, Raisin Bran had his own set, too.

Diaz didn’t stop there, deciding to treat herself when she had to postpone her nuptials. Since she chose a lower-price-point Target set for $22 and kept her job in PR, Diaz was able to splurge on more sets, and over the course of a year she spent more than $100 on new pajamas. She said she’d never bought this much sleepwear before.

Prior to the pandemic, Diaz said, her leisure clothes consisted of oversized T-shirts. On the subject of pajamas, she said, “I just thought it was kind of like an unnecessary, luxury purchase, you know?”

Yes, we all know. Last April, PJ sales spiked 143% compared to March, launching an intimates-fueled year of quarantine. And in the year leading up to January 2021, market research firm NPD Group told Insider, pajamas priced at $50 or more grew at triple the rate of the total pajama market. In 2019, the global industry was worth more than $10 million, and it’s projected to reach more than $18 million by 2027.

Even the ultrawealthy got in on the action, fueling a boom in $1,000 pajama sets for the 1%.

The durability of this golden age for modern pajamas may even be a part of the new normal as the world reopens. That will depend on how long “skin hunger” and disruptions of “scheduled spend” continue to change the shape of the economy.

A post shared by Raisin Bran The Dog (@raisinbranthedog)

From unnecessary luxury, to comfort and self-care

When Ashley Merrill founded the pajama brand Lunya in 2014, she said her biggest task was convincing people to pay nearly $200 for something to wear around the house.

“They’re very comfortable spending $250 on a cocktail dress, despite the fact that they’ll maybe wear it once or twice, and very uncomfortable with the idea of spending $200 bucks on a sleep set which they will probably wear 197 out of 365 days a year,” she said.

That changed in a big way in 2020, as pajamas took the place of office clothes, red carpet glam, and streetwear. Those in the $50-to-$200 range from brands like Lunya, Eberjay, and Lake brought luxury to middle-class bedrooms, and sub-$50 sets from the likes of Target and Marshalls also served as a self-care indulgence for many in quarantine.

The market has shifted, Merrill said. Her brand, which has historically sold its washable silk sets in solid, neutral colors, is launching its first pattern. Merrill said she believes people have proven they’re willing to splurge on at-home clothes and are ready for a little more distinctive.

“We’re playing with some things that are a little more special, a little novelty, because we’re realizing, people are ready,” she said. “They now get the value of what it would mean to have something that they feel great in around the home.”

We’re suffering from ‘skin hunger’

In the last three months of 2020, searches peaked for pajamas on the shopping app Liketoknow.it, with over 200,000 unique queries for the term. A spokesperson for the company said shoppers are on the hunt for “silk pajamas,” “pajama sets,” and “satin pajamas” – all of which had triple-digit month-over-month growth last year and still sit in the top searches today.

These fabrics satisfy what Lorna Hall of London-based trend forecasting firm WGSN calls “skin hunger.”

“Many of us are starved of touch,” Hall said, “so tactile fabrications become really important, because they sort of mimic touch.” She said silks, satins, and plushes are examples of fabrics that satisfy this need.

The spokesperson for Liketoknow.it separately agreed with Hall. “Our consumers are very much still in the cozy mindset, with search data for things like loungewear, matching sets, nap dress, and home bedding all trending since the start of lockdown last year,” the spokesperson said.

Anne Read Lattimore and Cassandra Cannon, the cofounders of pajama brand Lake, said their most popular product had a blowout 2020. They sold 38,816 Peruvian pima cotton short sets, contributing to a 136% year-over-year increase in revenue. Lunya, which Hall credits with bringing washable silk to the masses, claims it has doubled revenue every year since launching in 2014, but declined to share exact figures.

The pandemic disrupted our ‘scheduled spend’

Among a certain set of customers, Hall told Insider, the pajama splurge could be the result of “lots of cash, nowhere to go.”

“The luxury pajama really fulfills a way to spend that makes sense, because you can wear them straight away, which, with a lot of apparel at the moment, you just can’t,” Hall said. “And you don’t have the event to wear something luxury and decadent to, because those events really don’t exist.”

Self-care items like pajamas took the place of what Hall calls “scheduled spend” or the purchases people regularly made in their pre-pandemic routine, like coffee, commuter fare, and lunches out. As routines changed, so did our regularly scheduled budgets. After all, Hall said, “bedtime is a thing that comes around every day, and lounging around in the house certainly is like a ubiquitous state for many of us.”

Plus, as Paris Fashion Week demonstrated, it’s no longer just about bedtime. Designers brought pajama-inspired looks to the catwalks this year, Hall said. “With pajama dressing and luxury nightwear, there’s a real crossover at the moment on the catwalks,” she said, describing Jil Sanders’ slip dress as “ostensibly going-out wear, but it’s a slip dress that could also be worn as a night dress, or is related to the night dress in terms of its shape.” In addition, Fendi’s wide-legged pants and intimates-inspired dresses fall in this category of “silky, satin-y, easy-to-wear, pajama-type wear as well.”

Hall said she believes the pajama boom will stick around post-pandemic, bolstered by designers’ pajama-inspired going-out wear. “Once you’ve treated yourself to something that’s of a certain fabric and quality level, it’s quite hard to go back when you’ve had the luxury sleep item.”

Read the original article on Business Insider