This is 996 culture, a grueling 72-hour work week popular in China that’s been criticized for ruining work-life balance

man walks past alibaba logo at headquarters
Alibaba, a Chinese e-commerce giant, is one of many companies criticized for its grueling work culture.

  • The 996 schedule compels employees to work from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week.
  • The schedule is widespread in China, especially among tech companies in China’s Silicon Valley.
  • Chinese workers have blasted the policy on social media for ruining their personal lives.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The brutal work schedule known as the “996” has been blamed for making work-life balance impossible, causing unnecessary stress, and even killing workers at some of China’s leading tech companies.

This unwritten rule of many Chinese workplaces has been championed by tech leaders and denounced by workers and activists for years. Here’s what you need to know about the infamous “996.”

What is 996 work culture?

The “996,” a work schedule which encourages or coerces employees to work from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week, is common among Chinese tech companies and startups. Though the practice is technically prohibited by Chinese law, many companies still enforce the hours informally or formally.

Working overtime is now normal,” a blogger on Weibo, a Chinese social media platform similar to Twitter, said. “What’s even more scary is that so many young people are already used to this and don’t dare to protest because they know even if they do, it will be useless.”

‘We can’t help but ask – is it really worth it to exchange our lives for money’? How does 996 affect Chinese workers?

For young tech workers, the grinding work schedule means more burnout and less time for basics like sleep, sex, or a personal life, according to the South China Morning Post.

An activist group created the project “996.ICU” on Github in early 2019, where critics listed examples of unreasonable overtime work and blacklisted companies accused of engaging in the practice and whitelisted companies with more humane hours, Reuters reported.

Furor over the “996” was reignited in December, 2019, after a 22-year-old working at Pinduoduo, an e-commerce company, collapsed and died on the streets of Urumqi, China, after leaving work at 1:30 a.m. The woman was seen in China as another victim of an extreme culture of overworking, and outrage flared on Chinese social media.

“This way of working is very harmful for the human body, we’ve heard a lot of news about deaths from working overtime in recent years, but this deformed overtime system still prevails,” one blogger said. “We can’t help but ask – is it really worth it to exchange our lives for money?”

Who supports this schedule?

Well, many Chinese tech CEOs for one.

Alibaba CEO Jack Ma, who rose from poverty to become one of China’s richest men, is one of the most fervent supporters of 996, calling the hectic schedule a “huge blessing” for young professionals. “If you find a job you like, the 996 problem does not exist,” he said. “If you’re not passionate about it, every minute of going to work is a torment.”

Richard Liu, CEO of Chinese ecommerce company JD.com, agreed with Ma’s statement, stating on his WeChat feed that “slackers aren’t my brothers!

But it’s not just Chinese leaders who defend long hours – Elon Musk believes that people looking to make an impact on the world should work 80 to 100 hours a week, saying “nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week.”

Is this policy actually effective?

Research has shown that shorter work weeks are often more productive and that people struggle to concentrate on their tasks for long hours. Sleep deprivation has also been linked to cancer, weight gain and memory problems.

Do you have a 996 work culture story to share? Email the reporter of this story from a non-work email at hschlitz@insider.com

Read the original article on Business Insider

14 pitch decks that startups looking to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits and marketers’ need to ensure their ads are working.
  • Check out these pitch decks to see how these startups pitched their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Data management tools

Google and Apple’s moves to clamp down on third-party cookies and the rise of online shopping have advertisers clamoring for help managing all their customer data so they can effectively market to them.

One such company is 4-year-old Amperity, which sells software that clients like Starbucks, Patagonia, and Crocs use to manage stats from sales, email, e-commerce, and loyalty card programs.

Amperity has raised $100 million in its Series D from existing investors including Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners, and Madrona Venture Group, for a total of $187 million.

Here’s the pitch deck that helped a marketing tech startup raise $100 million at a $1 billion valuation to help brands manage their data


Out-of-home advertising platform

Outdoor advertising is coming back after being crushed during the pandemic, and adtech startup OneScreen.ai is hoping to cash in with a platform for brands to search, buy, run and measure their out-of-home ad campaigns.

OneScreen just raised $1.2 million in pre-seed funding in a round led by Florida-based fund TechFarms Capital with other investors including HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah, Wayfair’s alumni fund Wayfund, Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe, and BuySellAds.com CEO Todd Garland.

See the pitch deck that Google, Hubspot and Wayfair alums used to raise $1.2 million to build the ‘Amazon of out-of-home advertising’


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a panel of 1 million US consumers that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He closed a $34 million Series C round last year, bringing its total raised to $46 million.

Rho Ventures, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Triangle Peak Partners, and Foundry Group participated in the Series C round in March ($18 million) and September ($16 million).

An agency vet used this pitch deck to sell what he called the ‘Siri for marketers,’ landing clients including Johnson & Johnson and Chipotle


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider

Salaries are on the rise in police departments across the US, despite protests and calls to defund the police

New york police officers
NYPD officers stand guard on April 4, 2021 in New York City.

  • The 2020 median salary for a police officer in the US was $67,290 – the median for all jobs was $48,769.
  • Despite ongoing calls to defund police departments, officer salaries are only getting higher.
  • Police forces are growing, too, with incentives to join such tuition reimbursement and signing bonuses.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Police work can be one of the best-paid professions in the United States.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2020 median salary for a police officer was US$67,290 – more than one-third higher than the national median of $48,769 for all occupations. Many officers probably earn much more, because the bureau’s analysis is based on hourly wages for a typical work year of 2,080 hours and does not include overtime – one of the factors that can drive an officer’s yearly income even higher.

Although there is a great deal of variation across the nation’s roughly 18,000 police departments, the agency also reports that salaries for police have largely climbed in the past five years – from an 8.8% increase in Mississippi, the state that overall pays its police the least, to a 21% increase in Hawaii, one of the best-paying states.

While efforts to control police budgets have succeeded in Austin, Denver, and Oakland, among others, the Biden administration recently announced that COVID-19 relief funds can be used to hire police officers to combat the rise in gun violence.

As a former police officer who studies policing in America, I think it is unlikely that police salaries can go anywhere but up.

Read more: 3 IT professionals who didn’t get a college degree and are now making 6 figures reveal how to succeed in their field

Police salaries are inching up

Just look at the trends across the US.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics published the mean salaries for police officers in all states plus the District of Columbia for the year 2018.

Somewhat predictably due to cost of living, California topped the list at $101,380, followed by Alaska at $88,030, where the cost of living also drives salaries higher. New Jersey, Washington state, and Hawaii round out the top five.

All of the 10 departments with the lowest-paid officers are located in the South, where Mississippi police officers earn slightly more than one-third of their California counterparts.

Large cities clearly offer higher wages to their police officers, as do some cities surrounding large metropolitan areas. The Los Angeles Police Department currently advertises a starting salary of $70,804 a year. That’s up from the 2015 starting annual salary of $59,717 – an 18.5% increase over just six years.

Starting salary for police officers in Baltimore is $55,117, with a seasoned officer earning $95,325, base salary alone. Seattle officers earn $83,600 once they’ve completed their basic academy training and top out at $109,512 after 54 months, not including overtime. Seattle even agreed to pay its officers an extra 2% for wearing body cameras.

Larger, better-paying police departments attract officers from smaller departments by offering more pay and better training for experienced officers. This often leaves a void that small agencies struggle to fill with qualified candidates.

There are three main drivers of police take-home pay: overtime, education, and competition.

1. Overtime

In his recent trial for the murder of George Floyd, Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was represented by an attorney paid for by his union, the Minneapolis Police Federation. This benefit is only a small part of the union’s 128-page labor agreement with the city, which details salaries, vacation, sick leave, medical insurance, grievance procedures and, in particular, overtime pay.

Reportedly, Derek Chauvin’s 2018 salary was $90,612, more than twice the average Minneapolis per capita income of $38,808 in 2019. But it’s overtime rather than base salaries that drives up officers’ total compensation.

Across the country, police officers typically receive “time and a half” for every hour worked beyond the standard 40-hour week, meaning a pay rate that combines their regular hourly rate plus an additional 50%.

Most union agreements also stipulate higher pay for other work deemed “overtime,” such as off-duty court appearances. They also stipulate other after-hours pay boosts, such as a minimum of four hours’ pay for officers called back to duty for any reason.

In practice, these extra pay arrangements have a huge effect on driving up the size of police budgets. A few examples:

  • In Los Angeles, where the second-largest police force in the US boasts salaries of $83,144 after two years of employment plus an annual 1.5% cost-of-living increase, the union recently negotiated $245 million in overtime pay for its officers.
  • Boston’s complex agreement with its police department results in many opportunities for overtime as well as extra payment for special assignments.

City governments typically budget for some police officer overtime, since that extra income does not count toward an officer’s eventual retirement pay and reduces the need to hire additional employees. However, unanticipated events such as national disasters, public demonstrations, and political rallies all result in overtime pay for cops that cities must pay whether or not they planned for it:

2. Education

Few local law enforcement agencies require a four-year college degree, but most offer educational incentives that range from a 2% annual salary increase for earning an associate’s degree to 10% for a bachelor’s degree.

For example, since 1970 in Massachusetts, police receive pay incentives of up to 25% over and above their regular salary for a master’s or law degree. The Chicago Police Department, among others, provides tuition reimbursement for college courses, as well as additional incentive pay once a degree is completed.

Such incentives may be a good investment. Research indicates that police officers with college degrees are less likely to use lethal force and are subjects of fewer citizen complaints. Since fewer complaints mean fewer claims to pay and lawsuits to defend, this can ultimately save cities money.

3. Recruitment

More police officers are leaving the profession before retirement age, according to a 2019 study by the Police Executive Research Forum. The group has also found that the number of applicants for police jobs has steadily declined over the past 10 years. So departments trying to attract new recruits often go beyond tempting salaries by offering incentives like assistance with relocation, housing and childcare, education pay, college tuition reimbursement, health club memberships, and employee signing bonuses.

At the New York Police Department, the nation’s largest force, the starting salary is a relatively modest $42,000 a year. But the department highlights on its website that starting benefits include “holiday pay, longevity pay, uniform allowance, night differential, and overtime,” which together with salary can boost annual compensation to more than $100,000.

Even smaller departments are coming up with incentives to try and remain competitive with larger agencies that can offer higher salaries, more overtime and more attractive benefits. The police department of Bellmead, Texas, a city of around 10,500 about two hours north of Austin, has begun offering experienced officers a $5,000 bonus for signing on to the force.

Another trend to watch: Not only are police salaries rising, but the size of police forces also continues to grow. The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts a 5% growth in police jobs from 2019 to 2029, from 813,500 to an estimated 854,200, which is faster on average than other occupations.

Laurie Woods, senior lecturer in sociology, Vanderbilt University

The Conversation
Read the original article on Business Insider

See 12 pitch decks that startups looking to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits and marketers’ need to ensure their ads are working.
  • Check out these pitch decks to see how these startups pitched their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a panel of 1 million US consumers that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He closed a $34 million Series C round last year, bringing its total raised to $46 million.

Rho Ventures, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Triangle Peak Partners, and Foundry Group participated in the Series C round in March ($18 million) and September ($16 million).

An agency vet used this pitch deck to sell what he called the ‘Siri for marketers,’ landing clients including Johnson & Johnson and Chipotle


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider

See the pitch decks that fast-growing advertising and media startups used to raise millions from top VCs

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits and marketers’ need to ensure their ads are working.
  • Check out these pitch decks to see how these startups pitched their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a panel of 1 million US consumers that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He closed a $34 million Series C round last year, bringing its total raised to $46 million.

Rho Ventures, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Triangle Peak Partners, and Foundry Group participated in the Series C round in March ($18 million) and September ($16 million).

An agency vet used this pitch deck to sell what he called the ‘Siri for marketers,’ landing clients including Johnson & Johnson and Chipotle


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider