REI’s annual Anniversary Sale is live with discounts up to 30% on camp gear and outdoor apparel

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REI Adventure
  • Through May 31, REI’s annual Anniversary Sale gives shoppers up to 30% off on outdoor gear and apparel.
  • REI is also offering 20% off one full-price item and 20% off an REI Outlet item with code ANNIV21.
  • The best deals never last long, so interested shoppers should act quickly.

REI is a one-stop-shop for outdoor adventurers. If you need anything for hiking, yoga, climbing, camping, or cycling, REI likely has you covered.

Through May 31, the company is running its annual Anniversary Sale which has historically been its biggest event of the year – and the current sale looks to continue that trend. Buyers can score up to 30% off on outdoor equipment such as REI Co-op-branded apparel, hiking pants from Prana, Columbia Sportswear, and Mountain Hardwear, and 25% off on women’s apparel from brands like Cotopaxi and Athleta.

REI’s also offering 20% off on one full-price item and 20% off on one REI Outlet item with the code ANNIV21. This could be on gear like tents from Big Agnes, BioLite’s FirePit+ (an Insider Reviews favorite), hiking backpacks from Osprey, or water bottles for Hydro Flask.

It’s worth noting that buyers don’t have to be official REI members to take advantage of the savings. We do think that the perks of REI’s lifetime membership far outweigh its one-time $20 cost, but the 2021 Anniversary Sale is open to anyone and everyone through May 31.

Lifetime Membership (medium)

The best deals from REI’s Anniversary Sale:

FirePit+ (medium, Preferred: REI)Women’s PhD Ski Light Socks (medium)Blanket (medium)Switchback Sleeping Pad (medium)Aura AG 65 (medium)Standard-Mouth Water Bottle (medium)Liftop III Boots (medium)Outback 500 GTX Hiking Boots (medium)Breeze AT Mid GTX (medium)EcoMade Tech Hiking Socks (medium)Give-N-Go Sport Mesh Bralette (medium)

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REI Co-op members can save 20% on select full-price gear right now

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

REI march end of season clearance sale
  • Now through March 29, REI’s Member Moment Sale lets Co-op members get 20% off one full-price item and an extra 20% off REI Outlet gear.
  • Members need only use the code “MEMBER21″ to activate the deal, which is available both online and in-store.
  • Historically, the best deals never last long. We’ve gathered some of the best deals from brands we trust below.

REI is a one-stop-shop for outdoor adventurers. If you need anything for hiking, yoga, climbing, or cycling, REI likely has you covered.

For a limited time, the company is giving its REI Co-op members exclusive coupons for 20% off one full-price item, as well as an extra 20% off anything bought via the REI Outlet. This includes gear like tents from Big Agnes, BioLite’s FirePit+ (an Insider Reviews favorite), and hiking backpacks from Osprey.

For what it’s worth, we think that the perks of REI’s lifetime membership far outweigh its one-time $20 cost. The member-exclusive discounts expire on March 29, but stock is limited. So act fast.

The best deals from REI’s Member Moment sale:

Copper Spur HV UL 2 Tent (medium)Flash (medium)Atmos AG 65 Pack (medium)FirePit+ (medium)Standard-Mouth Water Bottle (medium)Campshire Fleece Jacket (medium)Woolyester Fleece Jacket (medium)Liftop III Boots (medium)Outback 500 GTX Hiking Boots (medium)Breeze AT Mid GTX (medium)Monkey Fleece Half-Zip Jacket (medium)EcoMade Tech Hiking Socks (medium)Give-N-Go Sport Mesh Bralette (medium)Protective Essential Midweight Liner Gloves (medium)

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The 5 best men-sized backpacking packs, perfect for everything from multi-day treks to weeks spent on the trail

  • The right backpacking pack makes trekking with a 30-pound bag on your back a more comfortable experience.
  • The best packs evenly distribute large loads, have several access points, and feature adjustable straps and hip belts. 
  • Our top pick, the Osprey Atmos AG 65, carries tons of gear yet stays comfortable with mesh venting and padded straps.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Backpacking is a fun but grueling outdoor activity – but it doesn’t always have to be. With the right equipment, a multi-day trip into the backcountry could feel like a literal walk in the park, and achieving this starts with purchasing the right backpack. 

Since backpacking requires you to haul everything you need to survive, your pack needs to both hold up to the harshness of the outdoors yet remain comfortable across long distances. This means finding one that’s capable of packing everything from a change of clothes and a sleeping bag to ample food and water (which includes gear like backpacking stoves, changes of socks, and, of course, equipment for making coffee). 

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, I’ve embarked on my fair share of backpacking trips, both big and small. Some had me spending just a couple of days on the trail with minimal mileage hiked each day while others were more intensive multi-day to week-long treks with tens of miles of ground covered between camps. While some of the gear you bring may be influenced by the season (like sleeping bags or hiking apparel), the pack you wear depends entirely on the trip you plan on taking.

But finding the right pack isn’t always an easy process. With so many on the market, it’s difficult to know which are best suited to the type of backpacking you prefer. To help, I’ve rounded up some of my favorite packs from brands like Osprey, Arc’teryx, and Gregory, all designed to function well in a variety of use cases. 

A note on fit

The backpacking backpacks featured in this guide are marked as “men’s” packs for a few reasons, all pertaining to their specific fit. Men’s packs tend to have larger carrying capacities, wider straps, taller hip belts, and larger torso dimensions.

Though they’re marketed as “men’s” packs, this doesn’t mean someone of any gender wouldn’t be able to find a men’s pack that fits them well and serves their backpacking needs (same goes for women’s backpacking packs, too). 

Here are the best men’s backpacking backpacks:

Best overall

Atmos AG backpack

With 65-liters of cargo space, upper and lower compression straps to stabilize heavy loads, and Osprey’s Anti-Gravity mesh back panel, the Atmos AG 65 is a backpacker’s dream.

Pros: Osprey’s Anti-Gravity mesh back panel molds to your back to create a comfortable, custom fit, included FlapJacket fly helps protect against rainy weather, upper and lower compression straps reduce load weight

Cons: Size could be bulky for smaller people, not ideal for short, day trips

The Osprey Atmos AG 65 focuses on providing absolute comfort no matter how far you’re hiking or how much cargo you’re hauling. Its 65-liter capacity may be too much for anyone setting out on an overnight trip, as it’s meant more for a weekend or longer excursions. Even when it’s not completely full, the pack never feels as though it’s flopping around on your back or creating a poor fit. 

It features a top-loading design in its main compartment, as well as several exterior pockets designed to hold water bottles, ice climbing tools, or trekking poles. The Atmos also has a zippered bottom area designed to hold a sleeping bag, as well as removable exterior straps which are used to secure a sleeping pad. 

For load management, Osprey’s LightWire frame connects the upper part of the pack to the hip-belt and central core to help distribute weight. Compression straps located on both the upper and lower part of the pack also reduced the pack’s bulk and balanced out heavier loads during my tests. 

Its best feature is the Anti-Gravity ventilated mesh back-panel that contoured to our back to create a snug fit. This helped evenly distribute weight, specifically taking it off our shoulders, hips, and back. This allowed us to carry more weight without feeling bogged down. 

The Osprey Atmos AG 65 is one of the best values among any picks on this list. Being uncomfortable can quickly ruin any backpacking trip, so investing in a pack like this one is always well worth the money.  

Best for short trips

REICoop

REI Co-op’s Flash 45 offers ample cargo room for weekend-long adventures but remains lightweight enough for quick day trips or overnighters.

Pros: Smaller capacity perfect for day trips, compatible with hydration pouches, contoured foam hip belt provides a snug and comfortable fit, UpLift Compression tech raises the load to improve stability, and it’s inexpensive

Cons: Not suitable for venturing off-grid for multiple days

Backpacking trips don’t always need to be grueling multiday treks, so when shorter day trips or overnighters are on the agenda, REI Co-op’s Flash 45 is the pack you’ll want. Small enough to avoid slowing you down but with enough cargo space to support you for one or two days on the trail.

Even for a smaller pack, it’s loaded with features geared toward making backpacking easier. REI designed its back panel to provide extra lumbar support while remaining breathable and flexible. It has a contoured hip-belt with foam padding throughout which sits snug against your body to create a custom fit.

On longer trips when I had more cargo, its compression straps helped raise its load while pulling it toward my center of gravity. This helped with pack stability which left me better balanced, and the pack better supported, while I hiked.

Other features include compatibility with a hydration pouch and external tool keepers for trekking poles or ice axes. It also has conveniently-placed bottle pockets that allow you to easily remove and place back water bottles. 

The Flash 45 is a great option for anyone just getting into backpacking but not interested in investing in a larger, more expensive model. 

Best for durability

Hyperlite backpack

Hyperlite Mountain Gear’s 2400 Southwest Pack features a Dyneema composite exterior that allows it to hold up to hanging branches, sharp rocks, or anything you come across while on the trail.

Pros: Constructed out of durable and lightweight Dyneema fabric, 40-liter volume offers enough cargo space for weekend trips, dedicated hydration pack pocket, seamed seals to keep the rain out

Cons: Only offers a few external pockets that can fill up easily

It’s not just your body that will take a beating on backpacking trips — your gear inevitably will, too. If you plan on backpacking in densely wooded areas or you find that your gear tends to get more scratched and scraped than you’d like, then check out the Hyperlite Mountain Gear’s 2400 Southwest Pack.

Constructed out of durable Dyneema fabric, the pack can be taken into the harshest environments with confidence. Dyneema’s light weight also helps reduce overall pack weight, something that proved beneficial when we packed this 40-liter bag to the brim. Its size is perfect for three-day treks and can even be an option for ultralight backpackers setting out for four or five days. 

Its roll-top closure system is easy to secure, though it did make it slightly difficult to reach gear in the bottom of the pack while we were on-the-move. There are a few external pockets to store gear that we could quickly access, but these are limited to the front of the pack. Vertical and horizontal compression straps along the sides of the pack help properly secure loads, which was especially useful when the pack wasn’t completely full. 

Its interior houses a mesh hydration sleeve that’s separate from the main compartment, so it won’t take up valuable gear space. Other features include fully-seamed seals to keep water out, as well as ice ax loops. The pack is a little expensive at $310 but its durability more than validates the investment.

Best for heavy cargo

Gregory backpack

With a lightweight aluminum chassis and an innovative suspension system, the Gregory Paragon 58 weighs less than 4 pounds, saving wearers some valuable packing weight.

Pros: Lightweight frame and suspension system makes heavy loads easier to haul, matrix ventilation system allows for increased airflow to keep your back cool, adjustable hip-belt makes it easy to customize the perfect fit, hydration sleeve doubles as a small daypack

Cons: The stitching on the daypack isn’t very durable 

Every backpacker knows that despite their best-laid plans to keep their pack light, they often end up bringing much more gear than anticipated. With Gregory’s Paragon 58, those heavy loads become much easier to handle, no matter how long the trip might be. 

The pack achieves this by way of an incredibly lightweight frame and suspension system that clocks in several pounds lighter than any other pack on this list. Though it may not seem that crucial, every pound counts when you’re hiking 10-plus miles for days-on-end and living solely out a backpack. 

Along with its matrix ventilation system that promotes increased airflow, the Paragon 58 is best-suited for trips anywhere from three to five days long. The final days of any backpacking trip can feel as though food, water, and clean socks are at a minimum but we took its lower weight into consideration and packed extra. This let us get through even a five-day trip with ease. 

One of its highlight features is its hydration sleeve that also doubles as a removable daypack. If we had camp set-up, this allowed us to not have to haul our big 58-liter pack on short treks to a nearby river just to tote along water or food. The daypack’s stitching isn’t the most durable and although it didn’t come undone on our trips, we could see how it might when used often. 

For $230, the Gregory Paragon 58 is a great backpacking option with incredible value. It’s best used for longer backpacking trips, or for anyone who has a hard time deciding on what to bring or what to leave behind. 

Best suspension system

Arc'teryx backpack

The Arc’teryx Bora AR 50’s innovative suspension system, which allows wearers to freely move without worrying about shifts in weight, is worth its high price tag.

Pros: Best suspension system on the market makes heavy loads feel lighter and promotes a wide range of movement, pivoting hip belt helps avoid the displacement of pack weight, constructed out of weatherproof materials, large enough capacity for weekend trips

Cons: Expensive

A backpacking pack’s suspension system has the ability to make or break a backpacking trip. Not only are they responsible for distributing the weight of a pack to make it more manageable for the wearer, but they help promote a range of motion and establish a comfortable fit. Right now, no pack does suspension better than the Arc’teryx Bora AR 50.

Thanks to the brand’s RotoGlide hip-belt, its suspension system is designed to completely rotate side to side while also offering free movement up and down. What this does is that with every step, the pack slides in either direction to allow for a natural stride, even when it’s packed full. This also reduces chafing and helps wearers maintain balance. 

Though this is helpful for any length of trip, we found it to be especially useful during weekend trips where our pack needed to carry the most gear. Whether crouching underneath a fallen tree or stepping up onto a high rock, the suspension system helped the pack remain stable through a wide range of motion. 

The pack also features a number of internal and external pockets that helped keep our gear organized. Its exterior kangaroo pocket was great for storing snacks we could access quickly, and would also function well for stashing wet gear. There are also side pockets sized for water bottles, as well as loops for trekking poles.

Arc’teryx designed the Bora AR 50 as a top-loading pack but included side zippers to make it easier to access gear stored at the bottom. The pack is also compatible with hydration pouches and features external storage loops for ice axes.

It’s the most expensive pack on this list at $500, but no other model offers as functional a suspension system as the Bora AR 50. If it wasn’t for the high price, we could easily see this as our overall pick.

Backpacking packs FAQ

Backpacking packs differ from traditional travel backpacks in that they’re designed to hold upward of 30 or 40 pounds of cargo, while still being comfortable to wear. The best packs do this by distributing weight across its frame to avoid having the bulk of the weight sit on any one part of your body.

These packs also tend to feature an abundance of pockets to hold a variety of gear, a sleeve for a hydration pouch, and multiple points of entry to make accessing what you pack along easier than just dumping everything out and repacking. You’ll also find most packs come with a series of adjustable (and padded) straps to fine-tune the fit, ventilation systems to promote airflow and keep you cool, and some sort of durable fabric to hold up to the harshness of the outdoors. 

How do you pick out the right size?

Many backpacking packs come in sizes such as small, medium, or large, but finding the right fit also comes down to personally customizing the pack yourself. This means adjusting the hip belt and changing the size of the pack’s torso length. You’ll also want to make sure the shoulder straps and any other stabilizing strap (sternum, load-lifter, etc.) are able to customize to your liking. 

A good rule of thumb for initially picking out a pack, too, is that your specific torso length is far more important than your height. Just because you wear medium shirts doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll wear a medium pack. Fine-tuning these adjustments and picking out the correct size allows the pack to be far less fatiguing while on the trail, and assures you’re able to get from point A to point B in as comfortable a way as possible.

How important is the pack’s fit?

Aside from packing the correct gear like sleeping bags, tents, and food and water, how your pack fits is one of the most vital steps to any backpacking trip. An ill-fitting pack can spell the difference between making it to camp without immense back pain or having to stop and readjust your load every few feet.

What are the most important features that it should have?

All backpacking packs should come with some form of padded hip belt, padded shoulder straps, a load-fitting strap (this is separate from the shoulder straps), and a sternum strap. Beyond those which help with the fit, you should also look for packs that come with a variety of useful storage pockets.

Personally, I like packs that have pockets on the hip belt for easy access to snacks, sunglasses, or anything else small I might need on the trail, as well as easily accessible water pouches (if it doesn’t come with space for a hydration pouch). Some packs also come with removable top pouches which can serve as day packs if you venture off from camp. 

You also want to make sure your pack can carry everything you need it to (but don’t go overboard). It’s not always smart to just buy the largest capacity backpack, even for long trips, because you run the risk of overpacking and a heavy backpack can severely weigh you down on trail. The best way to judge how much gear to bring is by weight, and you generally don’t want to pack more than 20% of your body weight. 

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REI’s January clearance sale can save you up to 50% on Patagonia, Columbia, REI Co-op, and more

When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more.

REI
  • Now through January 18, REI is offering up to 50% off all clearance apparel and footwear from brands like Patagonia, Osprey, Columbia, and more.
  • Historically, the best deals never last long – stock is limited. We’ve gathered some of the best deals from brands we trust below.

REI is a one-stop-shop for outdoor adventurers. If you need anything for hiking, yoga, climbing, or cycling, REI will likely have you covered.

To kick off the new year, REI is dropping the price on a ton of gear during its January clearance sale.

Now through January 18, you can save up to 50% on clearance apparel, in masculine and feminine styles, jackets, and shoes, including popular brands like Patagonia, Osprey, Columbia, The North Face, and the retailer’s own REI Co-op. The sale runs through Monday, but the best stuff always sells out, so don’t hesitate to add to your cart if you find something you love.

The best deals from REI’s January Clearance sale

Product CardInspire 2 (medium, Preferred: REI Co-Op)Product CardProduct CardProduct CardAllpa 35L Travel Pack (medium, Preferred: REI Co-Op)

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The best snow sleds

  • A proper snow sled is an entertaining (and exciting) way to spend a snow day, no matter if you’re playing hooky from work or just looking to pass some time on the weekend. 
  • The best sleds should all have these three things in common: Enough surface area for one to two people to ride comfortably, a design that allows a smooth (and fast) ride, and some form of steering wheel or rope for added stability. 
  • Our top pick, the Slippery Racer Downhill Xtreme Toboggan Snow Sled, is a swift and stable sled that’s large enough for both an adult and child to share a ride together. 

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Sledding is a winter pastime that’s as thrilling as it is fun. Not only is it a popular recreational activity for people of all ages but variations of sledding (i.e. the luge, skeleton, and bobsled) are beloved Olympic sports. Regardless of whether you’re gunning for a gold medal or just want to see how fast you can go careening down a snow-filled hill, you’ll always need that one thing that gets you from Point A to wherever you land on Point B: A sled. 

But not all sleds are created equal, and you don’t even need a genuine, by-the-book sled to get downhill. In addition to those classic metal and wood sleds, you can also use a plastic toboggan-style sled, an inflatable intertube, and even a round saucer (and who hasn’t just used a garbage lid?). 

If you crave the thrill of downhill snow sledding but aren’t sure which sled variant is best, we have you covered: The following guide includes some helpful tips and info on the best sleds for a range of use cases. With one of these sleds, you’ll be able to turn any normal snow day into a snow sled day. They’re also suitable for use with your kids.

Here are the best sleds you can buy:

Updated on 12/23/2020 by Rick Stella: Updated the introduction for relevancy, revised the copy for each pick, checked the availability of all recommended sleds, and updated the prices and links where necessary. 

Best sled overall

sled

The Slippery Racer Downhill XTreme Toboggan Snow Sled was designed for top speeds, but it’s also stable enough for a parent and child to safely enjoy together.

Pros: Fast on most types of snow, fits adult and child, durable plastic body

Cons: Bottom scratches and loses slickness over time

The Slippery Racer Downhill XTreme Toboggan Snow Sled is the closest adult-sized approximation to the sled I used as a kid. It has the classic plastic toboggan shape with a few upgrades I would’ve been glad to see as a kid but that is certainly enjoyable today.

These include cutout handles for a secure grip and easy carrying, a proprietary IceVex cold-resistant coating that helps prevent cracking and scratching, and construction using such a durable yet flexible plastic that the sled can bend to 90 degrees without breaking.

The bottom of the 48-inch long Slippery Racer toboggan is smooth and slick, helping it to glide over all sorts of snow, from soft, fresh powder to heavier, wetter packed snow. The sled features a slight taper toward the front that increases its dynamic performance and also serves to accommodate a smaller rider during an adult-child tandem ride.

While you should always avoid rocks, trees, and other solid objects during a sled ride, should you endure an impact with some such obstacle, know that the sled can take the abuse without breaking. That’s backed up by a yearlong warranty Slippery Racer throws in with each purchase.

And while the Slippery Racer Downhill XTreme Toboggan is an adult-sized sled, it’s also more than suitable for kids. The site ToyTruckToys.com recommends it for kids over the age of four, calling it a “beginner to intermediate” sled.

Best inflatable snow tube

snow tube

The A-DUDU Inflatable Snow Tube gives a swift, comfortable ride down the hill, and its air-filled design cushions riders against the jolts and bumps along the way.

Pros: Smooth and comfortable ride, supports up to 250 pounds, easy to store when not in use

Cons: Requires inflation prior to use, cannot be steered or controlled

One of the best things about an inflatable snow tube is the fact that when it’s not being used, it can be deflated, folded up, and stored in a cabinet or drawer. That makes the A-DUDU Inflatable Snow Tube a great choice for the apartment-renter for whom free space is at a premium.

This tube can zip riders up to 250 pounds down a snowy hill at great speed. The A-DUDU Inflatable Snow Tube measures 47-inches in diameter, easily supporting larger, taller adults, and is suitable for use by two kids at the same time, provided they’re ready to share those handles.

The rugged PVC exterior of the tube resists tears and punctures and resists cracking even in temperatures as cold as negative 40 degrees Fahrenheit. The tube inflates quickly by mouth or with an air pump and stays sealed shut thanks to a double-locking valve.

Snow tubes might be nearly impossible to control, but they do absorb many of the bumps and jumps along the way, thanks to that huge cushion of air. And besides, less control means more excitement.

Best classic runner sled

sled

The Flexible Flyer Steel Runner Sled is a timeless classic made with a birch wood deck and red steel runners.

Pros: Steering bar controls direction, beautiful classic style, last for years

Cons: Rather expensive, greater risk of injury than with other sled types

You could easily be forgiven for buying the Flexible Flyer Steel Runner Sled as a piece of faux-vintage decoration. It would look great beside the fireplace, above the mantle, or among the collection of wacky tchotchkes on the wall of a casual dining restaurant. But where this sleigh-style sled truly belongs is flying down a snowy hill at high speed.

Though a wood and steel runner sled may look antiquated, there’s a reason they’ve been produced since the late 1880s: They flat-out work. While not suitable for use on fresh powdery snow, in the right conditions, this sled is as fast as almost any modern option while also allowing you to control your ride. With a flexible steering bar at the front of the sled, you can steer right or left and enjoy the ideal route down, avoiding obstacles and people and hitting jumps and drifts, if that’s your thing.

The sled is recommended for ages five and older and can accommodate most adults. I’d probably recommend you wait until the kids are a bit older than five, personally, as the chance for injury is a bit higher with this sled than with a plastic toboggan or inflated snow tube. Wood and steel just hurt more than plastic.

Best saucer sled

Lucky Bums sled

The Lucky Bums Powder Coated Metal Saucer might be impossible to steer, but it’s also basically impossible to ride without a smile on your face.

Pros: Works on most types of snow, built to last for years, suitable for wide age range

Cons: Impossible to steer

If you’ve seen the classic comedy “Christmas Vacation,” starring Chevy Chase, then you know a flying saucer style sled can potentially lead to a tragicomic tableau. Skip the extra grease on the bottom, and you should be able to enjoy this saucer without quite as much risk of personal injury as Chase’s Clark Griswold while still having lots of fun this winter.

The lightweight but virtually indestructible Lucky Bums Powder Coated Metal Saucer is fun for kids and adults alike thanks to the simplicity and durability of its design. Even a smaller child or a larger adult should be able to fit on this sled thanks to its 25-inch diameter. You’ll just have to sit cross-legged, of course. And despite being made of metal, the saucer only weighs six pounds, so even a younger child can carry it back up the hill.

You can’t steer a saucer — that much is important to know going in — but they also tend to work well on all sorts of snow, from slush to ice to powder to those perfect large, downy flakes. While a runner sled bogs down on lighter, fluffier snow and a toboggan can sink into slushier snow under a larger rider’s weight, this smooth disc will slip along over all sorts of wintry precipitation with ease.

Check out more Insider Reviews winter gear guides

snowshoes

The best snowshoes


The best ski gear for resort riding


The best base layers


The best space heaters


The best thermal gloves

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