How to check ‘League of Legends’ server status if you can’t connect to the game

PC gaming on desktop computer
If “League of Legends” isn’t working properly, it may be an issue with Riot Games’ servers.

  • You can check “League of Legends'” server status through Riot Games’ website or Twitter account.
  • If there aren’t issues on with “League’s” servers, you should troubleshoot your own internet connection.
  • For example, try resetting your router and then opening “League of Legends” again.,
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Multiplayer online games like “League of Legends” can be fun, except when you run into server issues and are dropped from your game without warning. When that happens, you can troubleshoot to fix the problem, but first you should check to see if the problems are coming from Riot Games’ own “League of Legends” servers.

How to check the ‘League of Legends’ server status

There are two ways to check “League’s” server status:

1. Check the Riot Games service status website. If there’s an issue, you should see a notice under “Current Messages.”

League of Legends server status 1
You’ll be notified of any server issues under “Current Messages.”

2. Check the Riot Games support Twitter account. The developer may post a tweet before it can update the website (though it posts to both areas when something goes wrong), so it’s worth checking both.

League of Legends server status 3
The @RiotSupport Twitter account may tweet out any server issues.

How to troubleshoot ‘League of Legends’ internet issues

There are a few options for troubleshooting: restarting the game, resetting your router, and exiting out of other internet tasks or downloads. Here’s how to do the first two methods:

Restart the game:

  • On a PC, press Ctrl+Alt+Delete/Esc to force-quit. Next, select “Task Manager” and then select the “League of Legends” app and hit “End Task,” then relaunch the game as usual.
  • On a Mac, press Option+Command+Esc to force-quit the application, then select the “League of Legends” app in the window and hit “Force Quit.”
League of Legends server status 4
On a Mac, try force quitting the League of Legends application.

Reset your router:

  • Unplug your router from the power supply and wait for 30 seconds before plugging it back in. Once you’ve done this, restart “League.”

For more tips on how to fix a faulty internet connection, check out our article, “10 ways to troubleshoot and fix any Wi-Fi problems you’re encountering.”

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LinkedIn said it’s investigating issues that appear to be affecting users in North America

LinkedIn office
The logo of LinkedIn can be seen at the digital fair dmexco in Cologne, Germany, 13 September 2017.

LinkedIn users are reporting outages on the career networking website. 

According to LinkedIn’s status page, the company is investigating the issue. “We are currently experiencing an issue across the platform that may cause some API requests to take longer or fail unexpectedly. We are investigating the issue and working on a resolution,” the page reads.

“We know some members are experiencing an issue with accessing LinkedIn on mobile and desktop. We’re working on this as we speak and will provide updates as we have them” LinkedIn told Insider in an email.

Down Detector, a website that monitors outages on various sites, shows a huge spike in problem reports in the last hour. Down Detector’s map shows outages clustered in cities around North America, and commenters are reporting issues in Europe as well.

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At least two lawsuits filed against Texas’ energy committee claim it was aware of shortcomings in the state’s energy supply from previous winter storms

texas storm
Pike Electric service trucks line up after a snow storm on February 16, 2021 in Fort Worth, Texas.

At least two lawsuits have been filed alleging that Texas energy committee at the center of its ongoing power crisis knew of the state grid’s shortcomings from past winter outages.

A lawsuit filed in Harris County, which includes Houston, on Thursday is seeking up to $10 million in damages from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, for its lack of preparedness leading up to Winter Storm Uri that hit much of the southern US on February 14. 

It was filed by Fort Bend County residents Mauricio and Daysi Marin. Mauricio Marin still relies on oxygen after recovering from COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, and alleges the utility provider did not adequately prepare him for an extended outage, according to a report from Law360.

“ERCOT’s forecast for the maximum electricity that would be consumed far under-estimated the reality,” the lawsuit said. “As a result, millions were plunged into darkness and cold as a result of a loss of electricity.”

Another lawsuit filed in Nueces County on Friday goes a step further, alleging ERCOT was aware of its energy supply’s weaknesses following similar winter outages in 1989 and 2011 and could have done more to winterize its system prior to the February 14 storm that left roughly 4 million Texans without electricity and heat at its peak. Millions of residents are still without water.

“This cold weather event and its effects on the Texas energy grid were neither unprecedented, nor unexpected, nor unforeseen,” the Nueces County suit alleges.

A spokeswoman for ERCOT said the committee hadn’t yet reviewed the lawsuits, but will respond accordingly once they do.

“Our thoughts are with all Texans who have and are suffering due to this past week,” the spokeswoman told Insider. “However, because approximately 46% of privately-owned generation tripped offline this past Monday morning, we are confident that our grid operators made the right choice to avoid a statewide blackout.”

ERCOT investigated past outages and recommended winterizing at-risk generators and production plants, the Nueces County suit says. In the winter of 2011, however, generators that failed in 1989 failed again, indicating that ERCOT’s previous mitigation efforts “were not adequate, or were not maintained,” according to an investigation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Committee report in 2011 that is cited in the lawsuit.

“The massive amount of generator failures that were experienced raises the question whether it would have been helpful to increase reserve levels going into the event,” the 2011 FERC report said.

The suit alleges many of the same generators, transmitters, and distributors failed again starting February 14 in what could have been an avoidable catastrophe. The suit does not indicate the amount it is seeking from ERCOT and other energy providers.

Roughly 81,000 customers are still experiencing outages as of Saturday morning, according to a company that tracks outages across the state. Temperatures were forecast to rise on Saturday as well, providing some relief to Texans who had gone days without heat in freezing temperatures. 

When the unusual winter storm struck the state power plants malfunctioned right when demand for electricity shot up as people tried to stay warm. As a result, ERCOT was forced to cut power to millions of households because there wasn’t enough energy to go around.

As of Saturday, at least 37 people had died as a result of the storm and the resulting outages, according to a NBC report Friday. Many died from carbon monoxide poisoning from household generators or in their cars while trying to stay warm, while others died from hypothermia and exposure to brutally cold temperatures. Many areas are still under a boil water notice, meaning drinking water could be contaminated, as much of the state’s grid comes back online.

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