Oprah’s interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle didn’t just expose the royal family – it also revealed just how the broken US healthcare system is

Oprah "what"
Oprah’s reaction to Meghan Markle’s claim that a member of the royal family was concerned over her baby’s skin color.

  • Oprah interviewed Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in a highly anticipated CBS special.
  • Viewers from the UK were shocked by how many pharmaceutical ads ran during the American broadcast.
  • Their medical costs are covered by the government, and their reactions expose how broken the US healthcare system is.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

In the year since Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepped down from their official duties as extensions of the British monarchy, scandalous, albeit unverified accusations came about from either side of the conflict. It all culminated in the royal couple’s primetime interview with Oprah, which revealed allegations of racism and abuse.

While the interview exposed the royal family’s callous treatment of Harry and Meghan, the conversation it drove online inadvertently exposed how broken the US healthcare system is. The interview aired from 8 pm to 10 pm Eastern in the United States, meaning that UK residents had to stay awake until the early morning hours to watch. As they did so, they became shocked and concerned by the existence of something Americans consider normal: a swarm of pharmaceutical ads.

“watching american adverts during the megan and harry oprah interview is so surreal, why are so many of them for meds?” tweeted one UK-based viewer.

“HELP why are all american ads about medicines??” tweeted another.

The answer is just as ridiculous as the existence of the ads themselves. The United States’ healthcare system was constructed on the idea of making money. Helping sick people is just a side effect.

Money is the motive

It’s easy to forget just how messed up the US healthcare system is – we Americans have lived with it our whole lives, which makes it “normal” – but the reaction to pharmaceutical advertisements by people living in Europe illustrate just how convoluted the American arrangement is.

“American adverts make me feel like I’m in some post-apocalyptic world” one viewer tweeted.

That’s because in the UK, the vast majority of people’s healthcare is administered by the National Health Service (NHS). When you get sick, you go to the doctor and are cared for at no cost “at the point of use,” meaning that the service itself is subsidized by taxes, but the actual care is free. If you are sick, you go to the doctor and are treated at no cost. If you have an accident, you are delivered to the hospital and operated on at no cost.

You don’t need insurance in the UK because it is provided through the NHS. Some supplemental insurance can be added, but only 10.5% of UK residents have that extra insurance.

Since the government is the almost exclusive buyer of medicines, the NHS negotiates a rate that it pays pharmaceutical companies and then provides the medicines to NHS users. Therefore, there’s no reason for pharma companies to aggressively advertise, and, in fact, these types of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical ads are banned in the UK.

In America however, pharmaceutical companies are competing to win over consumers and drive up their profits. Instead of having a nonprofit government entity to negotiate on their behalf, average Americans either have to fend for themselves or rely on insurance companies – who are also profit-driven – to negotiate the price for them.

That’s also where the ads come in. There are often multiple, competing brands of any given medication, so drug ads are designed to drive people towards more expensive name brand drugs and push people to try drugs they may not need. All of this is moot in a UK-style system where the government does the negotiating with drug companies.

The results of the profit-driven US model are devastating. Let’s use diabetes type 1 for example, a condition where the body can’t make enough insulin, which causes high blood pressure and affects more than 1 million Americans.

There are three competing insulin manufacturers in the US, the lack of competition and ability to negotiate for higher profits has in turn driven the cost of insulin so high that people are engaging in “insulin rationing,” or using less insulin than they should be, to make the doses last longer. This sort of rationing has led in some cases to death. The Twitter user above may have been joking when they described this as “post-apocalyptic,” but a system where it’s necessary to ration anything you need to live fits pretty squarely into that definition.

Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical industry raked in $1.3 trillion, with a “t,” in 2019.

And on top of these drug costs, American also have to deal with soaring insurance premiums and high, uncertain costs for basic needs, like ambulances.

It makes sense how dumbfounded UK viewers were when they saw American commercials for medication. They live in a system that doesn’t penalize you for something you cannot control.

The need for an American universal healthcare system, like Medicare For All, only intensifies with time. As long as our healthcare system prioritizes profit over people, we will continue to look ridiculous to the rest of the world.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Oprah’s 7 best interview techniques that anyone can replicate, according to a psychotherapist

Oprah Winfrey interview Meghan and Harry
Oprah Winfrey spoke to Meghan and Harry in an interview that aired on CBS.

As a therapist and the host of The Verywell Mind Podcast, I see first-hand how the questions you ask and the way you ask them determine how open people are when they respond. Interviewers who help people feel comfortable encourage their interviewees to speak more freely.

Oprah’s interviewing skills have stood the test of time because she strikes a great balance between helping guests feel like they’re part of an intimate conversation while also helping her audience feel like they’re part of the interview.

Her recent interview with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry highlighted her skills as she got the couple to open up about sensitive subjects and their former life in the royal family. Here are seven reasons why Oprah is so good at asking questions that draw out candid, honest answers.

1. She is comfortable with silence

Silence feels uncomfortable for both the interviewer and the interviewee. And while many interviewers race to fill any pause that lasts more than a second or two, Oprah sits back and waits.

She knows her guests feel awkward too. And she lets them fill the gap.

The pause is often a sign that a guest is hesitating to share more information. When there’s an awkward silence, however, most guests will be eager to fill it – even if that means chiming in with the rest of a story that they’re hesitant to tell.

This is crucial as it means her guests often go on to share the harder parts of their stories or the raw emotions they’re experiencing.

2. She’s direct

Some interviewers sugar-coat uncomfortable questions. Others seem apologetic for asking about tough subjects. And a few seem to enjoy being intense in their questions as a way to create extra tension.

Oprah is kind when asking questions but she’s also direct. Her manner of asking tough questions in a matter-of-fact way helps people feel more comfortable answering.

After all, if you’re apologetic or you seem uncomfortable asking a question, people may think they should feel awkward about answering.

3. She uses reflective listening

People open up more when they know someone is really listening to them. But listening isn’t just about passively waiting. It’s about reflecting back what you hear to show you’re trying to truly understand.

When someone shares a story and then ends with a statement like, “That was so tough to deal with as a kid,” Oprah often responds by repeating back the last few words. Saying, “That sounds tough for you to deal with as a kid…” opens the door for them to keep talking.

4. She asks follow up questions

Oprah’s conversations are organic. She doesn’t just pick from a list of pre-written questions to ask her guests.

She asks follow-up questions that show she wants more information about what her guest just said. She shows she’s interested in taking a deeper dive into their wisdom and their experiences.

5. She doesn’t know all the answers

Some interviewers insist they only ask questions they already know the answers to so that they’re never surprised or thrown off guard. That’s definitely not Oprah’s approach.

Clearly, she conducts research on her guests. That information guides the question she asks. But, she also asks questions that people haven’t ever been asked before and she shows a genuine response to their answers.

6. She leans in

Oprah looks relaxed while she waits for her guests to answer her questions. This ensures that people being interviewed don’t feel rushed when answering questions.

She also leans in at just the right moment. Leaning forward in her chair when they’re sharing raw emotion sends a clear signal that she’s with them and wants them to keep going. People feel safe when they know they’re being heard.

7. The conversation is authentic

The conversation between Oprah and her guests appears authentic. The guests feel as though Oprah really wants to learn from them and the audience feels like they’re watching two people having a real conversation – rather than an expert interrogating someone about their story.

That authenticity is why Oprah is such a trusted resource. Her body language and facial expressions match the words coming out of her mouth.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch Oprah’s interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle for free online

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.

  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepped down from their royal duties in 2020.
  • The couple revealed more about their exit in a CBS interview with Oprah Winfrey on March 7.
  • You can watch the special right now on CBS.com or the CBS app.

Roughly one year after they left their royal duties behind, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle discussed what led to their big exit during a CBS interview on March 7.

The interview, conducted by Oprah Winfrey, was a two-hour primetime special that touched on some of the reasons for their departure. The program featured a number of revelations from the two, including that Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, made Markle cry. The two also discussed unnamed members of the royal family who had “concerns and conversations” about their son Archie’s skin tone.

CBS filmed the interview before bullying accusations were made against Markle from a number of staff members at Buckingham Palace. On March 3, Buckingham Palace announced it would investigate the accusations.

If you want to catch up on Oprah Winfrey’s CBS interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, here’s how you can watch the full special online.

How to watch ‘Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special’

Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special” aired March 7 on CBS. You can now watch the full interview on-demand through CBS.com and the CBS app.

The interview is available for free without the need to sign in with a cable subscription, but there are commercials during the program. You can access CBS.com through web and mobile browsers. The CBS app is available on most media devices, including Roku, Fire TV, Android TV, and Apple TV.

Is Oprah’s interview with Meghan and Harry available on Paramount Plus?

As of March 8 at 9 a.m. ET, “Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special” is not yet available on Paramount Plus. It’s possible that the program could be added to the service at a later date.

Paramount Plus typically airs news specials and programs from CBS shortly after they are broadcast on the network. The subscription service costs $6 a month for the ad-supported plan, or $10 a month for the commercial-free plan. 

Both plans currently include access to your local CBS network in most markets. You can see a full list of supported areas here. Subscribers also get access to a huge library of on-demand shows and movies. You can find more information about the service in our full Paramount Plus guide. If you want to try Paramount Plus, you can sign up for a one-month free trial. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch Oprah’s interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tonight on CBS

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.

  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepped down from their royal duties in 2020.
  • The couple will reveal more about their exit in a CBS interview with Oprah Winfrey tonight at 8 p.m. ET.
  • You can watch the special on cable or through streaming services with CBS, like Paramount Plus.

Plus Monthly Subscription (small)

Roughly one year after they left their royal duties behind, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will discuss their big exit during a new interview tonight on CBS. 

The interview, conducted by Oprah Winfrey, is a two-hour primetime special that will touch on some of the reasons for their departure. In clips from the program, Markle discusses the royal family’s role in spreading misinformation about her. Markle also tells Winfrey about feeling pressured to decline interviews with her while she was a member of the royal family. The program will run from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ET.

CBS filmed the interview before bullying accusations were made against Markle from a number of staff members at Buckingham Palace. On March 3, Buckingham Palace announced it would investigate the accusations.

If you want to catch Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, here’s how you can watch it tonight on CBS through cable and streaming services.

How to watch ‘Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special’

“Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special” will air on March 7 at 8 p.m. ET on CBS. You can watch the program on cable, over-the-air TV, or streaming services with CBS.

You can also stream the interview on CBS.com if you have an authenticated cable plan.

Streaming services with CBS

For easy streaming access to CBS, we recommend Paramount Plus (formerly CBS All Access). The subscription service costs $6 a month for the ad-supported plan, or $10 a month for the commercial-free plan. With that said, the ad-free option still has commercials during live TV. 

Both plans currently include access to your local CBS network in most markets. You can see a full list of supported areas here. Subscribers also get access to a huge library of on-demand shows and movies. You can find more information about the service in our full Paramount Plus guide.

If you want to try Paramount Plus, you can sign up for a one-month free trial. However, if you want to continue watching live CBS through the service in the months to come, be aware that the $6/month ad-supported plan will drop to a new $5/month plan in June. The new ad-supported plan will not include live CBS.

Plus Monthly Subscription (small)

Outside of Paramount Plus, Locast is another streaming option with access to CBS. The non-profit service offers dozens of local streaming channels for free in 29 markets across the country.

On the downside, Locast interrupts its streams with donation requests unless you pay the $5 a month donation fee. Its app is also very limited and it only includes local stations. 

Streaming Subscription (small)

You can also watch CBS on other live TV streaming services, such as Hulu + Live TV, Fubo TV, YouTube TV, and AT&T TV.

Those streaming services cost significantly more than Paramount Plus, however, with starting prices ranging between $65 and $70 a month. On the plus side, they all provide a larger selection of live channels, including other local stations and several cable networks.

If you’re looking for a true cable alternative, and not just a simple method to stream CBS, then it’s worth paying the extra money for one of these platforms.

+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch Oprah’s interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle this Sunday on CBS

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey.

  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepped down from their royal duties in 2020.
  • The couple will reveal more about their exit in a CBS interview with Oprah on March 7 at 8 p.m. ET.
  • You can watch the special on cable or through streaming services with CBS, like Paramount Plus.

Plus Monthly Subscription (small)

Roughly one year after they left their royal duties behind, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will discuss their big exit during a CBS interview on March 7.

The interview, conducted by Oprah Winfrey, is a two-hour primetime special that will touch on some of the reasons for their departure. In clips from the program, Markle discusses the royal family’s role in spreading misinformation about her. Markle also tells Winfrey about feeling pressured to decline interviews with her while she was a member of the royal family.

CBS filmed the interview before bullying accusations were made against Markle from a number of staff members at Buckingham Palace. On March 3, Buckingham Palace announced it would investigate the accusations.

If you want to catch Oprah Winfrey’s CBS interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, here’s how you can watch it on March 7.

How to watch ‘Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special’

“Oprah with Meghan and Harry: A CBS Primetime Special” will air on March 7 at 8 p.m. ET on CBS. You can watch the program on cable, over-the-air TV, or streaming services with CBS.

You can also stream the interview on CBS.com if you have an authenticated cable plan.

Streaming services with CBS

For easy streaming access to CBS, we recommend Paramount Plus (formerly CBS All Access). The subscription service costs $6 a month for the ad-supported plan, or $10 a month for the commercial-free plan. With that said, the ad-free option still has commercials during live TV. 

Both plans currently include access to your local CBS network in most markets. You can see a full list of supported areas here. Subscribers also get access to a huge library of on-demand shows and movies. You can find more information about the service in our full Paramount Plus guide.

If you want to try Paramount Plus, you can sign up for a one-month free trial. However, if you want to continue watching live CBS through the service in the months to come, be aware that the $6/month ad-supported plan will drop to a new $5/month plan in June. The new ad-supported plan will not include live CBS.

Plus Monthly Subscription (small)

Outside of Paramount Plus, Locast is another streaming option with access to CBS. The non-profit service offers dozens of local streaming channels for free in 29 markets across the country.

On the downside, Locast interrupts its streams with donation requests unless you pay the $5 a month donation fee. Its app is also very limited and it only includes local stations. 

Streaming Subscription (small)

You can also watch CBS on other live TV streaming services, such as Hulu + Live TV, Fubo TV, YouTube TV, and AT&T TV.

Those streaming services cost significantly more than Paramount Plus, however, with starting prices ranging between $65 and $70 a month. On the plus side, they all provide a larger selection of live channels, including other local stations and several cable networks.

If you’re looking for a true cable alternative, and not just a simple method to stream CBS, then it’s worth paying the extra money for one of these platforms.

+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)

Read the original article on Business Insider