How technology is changing the advertising industry

WPP London.JPG

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and consumer habits are impacting how advertisers reach people and spurring new competition for ad dollars.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how ad buyers and sellers are impacted.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.


The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:


Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to zap ads at people by building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:


Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:


Ad agencies are getting disrupted

While the established holding companies scramble to adapt to the digital shift, new ad companies focused on digital specialities and armed with new private-equity funding threaten to take their place.

Read more:


Retailers are seeking a piece of the ad pie

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

A new set of companies sees an opportunity in selling advertising include food delivery companies, online retailers, and brick-and-mortar grocers. They’re hoping to replicate the success of Amazon, which claimed 10.3% of the US digital ad market in 2020 and is competing with Google and Facebook for ad budgets.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How technology is upending the advertising business

WPP London.JPG

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and evolving consumer habits are forcing advertisers to change longstanding ways of zapping ads at people.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how these changes are impacting ad buyers and sellers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.

The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:

Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to target consumers, building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:

Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:

New players are disrupting the ad industry

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

The established holding companies are scrambling to adapt to the digital shift, while new kinds of specialty ad companies threaten to take their place.

And a new set of companies including delivery services, retailers, and platforms like Instacart, Walmart, and TikTok are gunning for a piece of the ad business.

Investors, startups, and vendors are also trying to cash in on the opportunity.

Read more:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How technology is changing advertising

California mall Macy's coronavirus
A shopping mall in San Mateo, California, the United States, May 19, 2021.

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and evolving consumer habits are ending longstanding ways of ad targeting.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how these changes are impacting ad buyers and sellers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.

The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:

Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to target consumers, building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:

Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:

New players are disrupting the ad industry

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

The established holding companies are scrambling to adapt to the digital shift, while new kinds of specialty ad companies threaten to take their place.

And a new set of companies including delivery services, retailers, and platforms like Instacart, Walmart, and TikTok are gunning for a piece of the ad business.

Investors, startups, and vendors are also trying to cash in on the opportunity.

Read more:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ad agencies are hiring again

Hi and welcome to Insider Advertising for May 25. I’m senior advertising reporter Lauren Johnson, and here’s what’s going on:

If this email was forwarded to you, sign up here for your daily insider’s guide to advertising and media.

Tips, comments, suggestions? Drop me a line at LJohnson@insider.com or on Twitter at @LaurenJohnson.


WPP office.JPG

These advertising companies hard hit by the pandemic are already hiring again for hundreds of roles

Read the story.


Chris Foster, CEO of Omnicom Public Relations Group
Chris Foster, CEO of Omnicom Public Relations Group

Omnicom Public Relations Group’s new CEO lays out how he plans to use healthcare experience to grow the PR giant

Read the story.


Reels Instagram Insights

Instagram is giving creators access to more detailed data, including Reels insights that influencers have been clamoring for

Read the story.


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at LJohnson@insider.com and subscribe to this daily email here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Advertisers are gearing up for live events again

Hi and welcome to the Insider Advertising newsletter. I’m Lucia Moses, deputy editor, and this week in advertising and media news:

If you got this newsletter forwarded, sign up for your own here.

First up: Don’t miss our webinar this Thursday on the future of ad targeting featuring execs from Mars Petcare, The Trade Desk, R/GA, and The Washington Post. Details here.


lovecraft country aunjanue ellis

Advertisers are banking on live events

HBO had to delay all-important screenings to promote “Lovecraft Country” last summer due to spikes in coronavirus cases.

This year, the entertainment giant found a pandemic-safe way to promote its content, creating an interactive display, HBO Max Orbit, for the virtual SXSW Festival and select AT&T stores.

Events are a significant part of many marketers’ budgets, and many of them are ready to jump back into live events as communities reopen, Patrick Coffee reports.

But spending is unlikely to approach pre-pandemic levels, and health risks remain a big concern.

Some marketers are, variously, seeking exit clauses to avoid a repeat of last year’s losses, and plan to make virtual events a part of their approach.

“We ended up losing a ton of money with things that had to be cancelled and other unseen costs,” Colleen Bisconti, VP of events and conferences at IBM, told Patrick.

Read the rest here: Big brands like IBM and HBO lay out how they’re betting on live events as pandemic restrictions ease up


Tim Conley, CEO of Extreme Reach
Tim Conley, CEO of Extreme Reach

TV advertising goes digital

Extreme Reach, a company that helps brands buy and plan TV and video ads, is acquiring rival Adstream, in hopes of giving clients a competitive advantage.

Behind the news:

  • Advertisers are increasingly looking to buy TV ads with digital-like precision.
  • The Adstream acquisition follows other TV adtech deals, like Comcast’s acquisition of Beeswax last year and Magnite’s agreement to acquire SpotX in February.
  • Companies that help marketers buy and measure their TV advertising are seen as acquisition targets and growth in adtech stocks, SPACs, and private equity have fueled interest in adtech.

Read more: A digital ad firm just snapped up a competitor to make TV advertising more digital


Jonathan Nelson.JPG
Jonathan Nelson is CEO of Omnicom Digital

Omnicom’s data play

Ad giant Omnicom Group created a new data-driven marketing unit, Omni Health, aimed at healthcare clients like Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson, Tanya Dua reports.

Key things to know:

  • Agencies have souped up their data tools in recent years to help advertisers precisely target people and fend off consultancies like Accenture Interactive and Deloitte.
  • Omnicom for its part says it’s spent tens of millions of dollars to build Omni Health.
  • Advertising agencies are making a big play for healthcare ad dollars, one of the few areas of ad spending that’s held up in the pandemic.
  • But Omnicom has plenty of competition from other ad and PR firms like IPG and W2O that are making similar bets.

Read more: Omnicom is trying to cash in on healthcare advertising with a new data tool for clients like Pfizer and Merck


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading, and see you next week!

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

Advertising agencies imagine the office of the future

Hi and welcome to the Insider Advertising newsletter. I’m Lucia Moses, deputy editor, and this week in advertising and media news:

Companies wrestle with burnout, reopening;

Crispin Porter Bogusky has a new CEO;

And new stats on TikTok users.

First, if you got this newsletter forwarded, make sure to sign up for your own here.


WPP London.JPG

Agencies consider the office of the future

Going back to the office is on everyone’s minds as vaccination rates rise.

But while agencies and media companies reimagine workspaces with shared desks, expanded meeting space, and touchless services, a sizable portion of people are likely to keep working partially if not entirely at home.

That poses a messy issue for companies that will have to accommodate hybrid workforces to make sure remote people don’t get left out and teams keep working smoothly, to say nothing of addressing burnout, Lindsay Rittenhouse reported.

From her story:

[WPP CEO Mark] Read said 5% to 10% of employees have gone back to most of WPP’s offices and expects more to return this summer, though there is no set date or mandate for reopening. He said WPP is figuring out how to safely reopen its global offices as well as how to “embrace the flexible ways of working we learned in the pandemic.”

Read said the holding company of agencies like Ogilvy, VMLY&R, and Wunderman Thompson would adopt a hybrid model, with offices being reserved for collaborative work and employees handling other solo tasks remotely.

He’s also mindful WPP will have to train managers to ensure all employees have the same opportunities to avoid excluding people who are remote.

Read more:


Marianne Malina


New CEO for CPB

Ad agency Crispin Porter Bogusky became famous for its work for marketers like Burger King, but since then, it’s lost its way, losing giant clients like Domino’s and Infiniti.

Now, it’s hoping for a new shot with a new CEO in Marianne Malina, who it poached from Omnicom’s GSD&M.

Malina has a promising track record: Under her stewardship, GSD&M won several big accounts like Capital One, Avocados from Mexico, and Pizza Hut.

Read more: Storied ad agency Crispin Porter Bogusky just hired a new CEO away from rival Omnicom as it tries to turn its fortunes around


TikTok
The TikTok logo is displayed on a phone in China on March 3, 2020.

TikTok users revealed

Tanya Dua got her hands on recent TikTok decks that reveal new stats on the red-hot video app’s usership and shopping proclivities.

They’re part of a pitch to get advertisers to spend more on the app, using new commerce-style ad formats, as its usage and online shopping have boomed during lockdown.

“TikTok is at a tipping point,” Jon Severson, the vice president and director of paid social at Mediahub, told Tanya. “It’s no longer just a novelty for brands to maybe try but is trying to become something that can drive incremental returns and business outcomes.”

Read more: Never-before-seen TikTok stats from leaked sales presentations show how it’s trying to lure advertisers to the platform


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading, and see you here next week.

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

How ad agencies are planning to return to the office

Hi and welcome to Insider Advertising for April 8. I’m senior advertising reporter Lauren Johnson, and here’s what’s going on:

If this email was forwarded to you, sign up here for your daily insider’s guide to advertising and media.

Tips, comments, suggestions? Drop me a line at LJohnson@insider.com or on Twitter at @LaurenJohnson.


Mark Read WPP Toby Melville Reuters.JPG

Here’s how major ad agencies like WPP and Omnicom are planning a return to the office

Read the story.


Sadoun Cannes.JPG

Publicis is signing on to The Trade Desk’s alternative to cookie-based ad targeting

Read the story.


David Bentley, CEO of Porter Novelli
David Bentley, CEO of Porter Novelli

Porter Novelli’s CEO lays out his plan to revive the PR firm after office closures and years of decline

Read the story.


More stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at LJohnson@insider.com and subscribe to this daily email here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Everything to know about the public relations industry, from pay and hiring to growth areas

Huawei China
Huawei, facing criticism over its expansion plans, hired Ruder Finn to handle its US PR.

  • PR firms are investing in data and analytics and expanding into areas like advertising and ecommerce.
  • They’re also taking advantage of booming areas like financial communications and diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Insider compiled this guide to how the field is changing for people looking to grow their PR business or break into it.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The public relations industry is going through big changes as PR firms invest more in data and analytics to prove the value of their services to clients and fend off competition.

They’re also expanding into hot new areas like creative, digital, and ecommerce services.

Some have begun rehiring and restoring pay cuts after making cutbacks in the pandemic and taking advantage of booming areas like financial communications and diversity, equity, and inclusion, creating lucrative if high-pressure jobs.

Business Insider has been tracking all these trends at some of the largest PR firms including Edelman, Weber Shandwick, and Sard Verbinnen, and rounded up our coverage, including the hot practice areas that are boosting firms’ revenue, how to get hired, and compensation.

Below are resources to guide people looking to learn about the industry, grow their existing PR businesses, or break into the field.

Hiring, pay trends

The PR industry employed around 270,000 people in the US as of 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It employs people who work in-house at brands as well as agencies of all sizes.

PR firms have cut hundreds of jobs in the downturn, but the field remains high-paying and intensely competitive. Recruiters still see growing opportunities in pharma, tech, healthcare communications.

PR salaries can vary widely. A VP at privately-held consulting and PR firm Teneo can earn $205,000, while the same role at Publicis’ MSL brings in a base salary of $165,000.

Read more: PR industry salaries revealed: How much top firms like Teneo, BCW, and FTI pay employees, from consultants to managing directors

How to get a job at PR giant Edelman and what to expect if you land an interview, according to the company’s recruiters

Meet 12 top public relations recruiters to know right now

What it takes to get high-paying jobs at strategic consulting firms like Finsbury and Kekst CNC, from handling tricky questions to nailing writing tests

Some areas are thriving in the downturn

While the industry took a hit in the downturn, CEOs of some of the biggest firms like Edelman, BCW, and FleishmanHillard see their businesses benefitting as new pitches pick up and companies seek help with crisis situations and communicating to the public and their workforces about office reopening and diversity and inclusion issues.

PR itself has come under scrutiny along with other industries for falling short when it comes to diversity leading some to pledge to hire more people of color, among other steps.

Read more: A PR trade group representing firms including Weber Shandwick and FleishmanHillard is embroiled in disagreements over whether firms should have to reveal how diverse their workforce is and pledge to hiring people of color

The world’s two largest PR firms, Edelman and Weber Shandwick, pledged to hire more people of color in senior positions

The Black Lives Matter movement has been an unavoidable subject for the C-suite – and PR giants are reaping the benefits

Internal communications business is booming for PR firms like Edelman, Prosek, and Kekst CNC as CEOs scramble to reassure remote workforces and plan for a return to the office

Insiders at Omnicom agency GMMB say the workplace is rife with ‘systemic’ racism, where people of color are tokenized and treated like ‘the help’

Firms are gearing up to take share from other industries

Some firms are also gearing up to take market share from advertising and management consulting companies, arguing that they can help clients deal with crises and promote brands while people may not be receptive to traditional advertising.

Among the most aggressive in this area is Edelman, which has built a 600-person staff of creatives including adland vets like Leo Burnett’s Judy John and McCann’s Lee Maicon to expand into advertising services.

Read more: Public relations heavyweight Edelman has quietly built a 600-person creative team and says it’s becoming a ‘serious alternative’ to ad agencies, winning clients like Ikea and Tazo

CEOs of PR firms like Edelman and BCW reveal why they’re focused on winning business from advertising and consulting companies coming out of the pandemic.

Strategic communications is a growth area

A lucrative but less understood niche is strategic communications, which involves crisis, litigation, financial, and other high-stakes public relations. It comprises firms like Finsbury, Kekst CNC, and Gladstone Place Partners, which have worked on crises like WeWork’s and blockbuster mergers like Disney-Fox.

These firms seek people who thrive under pressure and use the interview process to test job candidates’ intellectual curiosity, commitment to their job, and if they’re good culture fits.

Read more: Meet 18 top PR pros that companies like SoFi and Talkspace are turning to in the SPAC IPO craze

PR firm Bevel hired a Goldman Sachs alum to cash in on the SPAC craze and win market share from financial communications heavyweights

Meet PR exec Jennifer Prosek, who built a $60 million business spinning for clients like Goldman Sachs and The Carlyle Group, and now faces her biggest challenge yet

These are the top 15 financial public relations pros CEOs call when their companies are on fire

PR firms like Joele Frank and Sard Verbinnen are seeing a windfall from bankruptcy cases but some risk being sued by former clients – here’s how agencies can protect themselves

PR giants like Edelman and Sard Verbinnen are seeing a surge in demand as companies seek to minimize damage from the coronavirus pandemic

How technology is changing PR

Public relations pros are facing increased pressure to prove the value of their services to clients.

These pressures have given rise to a $4.5 billion communications software industry that helps PR pros do things like monitor news coverage and social media, provide accurate measurements, and identify influencers and journalists.

Some PR firms like Edelman and MSL have responded by developing their own tools to monitor news and track the impact of PR for clients like Procter & Gamble and Cadillac.

Read more: The top 27 software companies serving the public relations industry

PR agencies are beefing up their data services to keep consulting firms like Deloitte and Accenture from eating their lunch

PR giant MSL breaks down how it’s using tech tools to prove its work drives results for clients like P&G and Cadillac

Cision and Meltwater, the two largest PR software companies, are planning a merger, and the DoJ has explored whether it would hurt competition

A year after PR giant Edelman struck a ‘first of its kind’ partnership with Cision, the deal is no longer exclusive

Companies are under fire for climate change. PR firm APCO Worldwide just partnered with a data startup to help them control the reputation risk.

Public relations giant Edelman is poaching execs from WPP, Google, and others to build a data analytics powerhouse

Omnicom is boosting its data arm with a new tool to convince skeptics that PR can drive business results

Healthcare marketing giant W2O just snapped up two more companies as it seeks to take on consultancies like Accenture and Cognizant

Read the original article on Business Insider

Companies face office reopening pains

Hi and welcome to this weekly edition of Insider Advertising, where we track the big stories in media and advertising.

Remember you can sign up to get this newsletter daily here.

What we’re following this week:


John Wren Omnicom
John Wren is chairman, president and CEO of Omnicom Group

Reopening pains

Reopening talks are heating up. Only about one in 10 companies expects all their employees to go back to the office, a recent report found. But it’s the exceptions that make the news.

Bloomberg LP recently made clear it expects staff to come back once they’re vaccinated. And employees at Zimmerman Advertising, part of the holding company giant Omnicom, say they’re feeling pressured by execs to return, shot or no shot, Lindsay Rittenhouse reported.

There are bound to be more such clashes as companies wrestle with the need for in-person work with providing a safe office environment.

From Lindsay’s piece:

Sources said Zimmerman HR and at least in one case, president Ronnie Haligman, started calling them individually last week, first asking how they felt working remotely. The employees said they responded that they were happy working from home.

But while there was no explicit mandate to return, the employees said the execs told them they needed to come back, explaining that the company was having financial troubles due to employees being less productive while remote, and citing the loss of business to remote work.

One employee said an HR executive told them last week that there would be layoffs if employees didn’t return and that while it wouldn’t be mandated, it would be “highly recommended for me to go back to the office on Monday.” “They are bullies,” this person said. “I am so disappointed.”

Read the full story: Employees at Omnicom-owned Zimmerman Advertising say the agency is pressuring them to return to the office

Also read:


alan murray fortune
Fortune CEO Alan Murray interviews former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit in 2017.

Walkout at Fortune

Steven Perlberg reports on another flareup between journalists and their bosses over productivity demands. At Fortune, staffers walked off to protest traffic quotas. Steven reports:

Like many publishers, Fortune’s lucrative live events business has come to a halt. Fortune launched a paywall in early 2020 shortly before the pandemic took hold, but staffers said it has more recently focused on chasing web traffic.

With that strategy came byline counts and traffic goals beginning last year that have faced internal resistance. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune’s union secretary and a healthcare reporter, said he is responsible for producing 250 stories and 4.1 million pageviews this year.

Mukherjee said those targets are unrealistic and not tied to good journalism. “It almost feels like you have to put a down payment in order to do your actual job,” he said.

At The New Yorker, unionized staff walked out over pay issues. With a recent uptick in newsrooms unionizing, there’s probably more friction like this to come.

Read more: Fortune staffers are walking off the job for a day to push for diversity and to protest new traffic quotas

Also read: New Yorker staffers are preparing for a possible strike as pay negotiations with Condé Nast stall


Tim Cook

Apple’s China problem

Apple is about to make big privacy changes requiring app developers, like Facebook, to ask users for permission to track them around the web to zap them with targeted ads.

But in China, some of the tech giants are testing a workaround, presenting a big test for Apple, Lara O’Reilly reports.

Apple maintained it will boot any apps that violate its policy. But all eyes will be on Apple to see if it holds firm to its view that privacy is a “fundamental human right” or make an exception for China, a crucial market for the company.

Read more: Apple faces a major test of how it enforces its policies in a key market as China’s tech giants explore a way to skirt its privacy changes


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading, and see you next week!

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

Zimmerman Advertising employees say they feel pressure to return to the office

Good morning and welcome to Insider Advertising for March 16. I’m senior advertising reporter Lauren Johnson, and here’s what’s going on:

If this email was forwarded to you, sign up here for your daily insider’s guide to advertising and media.

Tips, comments, suggestions? Drop me a line at LJohnson@insider.com or on Twitter at @LaurenJohnson.


John Wren Omnicom

Employees at Omnicom-owned Zimmerman Advertising say the agency is pressuring them to return to the office

Read the story.


Eddie Kim, founder and CEO of Memo
Eddie Kim, founder and CEO of Memo

Public relations startup Memo raises $7 million from investors in Uber, Robinhood, and The Trade Desk, to take on giants like Cision

Read the story.


bridgerton
“Bridgerton” is currently streaming on Netflix.

Netflix and ESPN gained the most TikTok followers among brands in the last year, according to new research. Here were the other top performers.

Read the story.


More stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at LJohnson@insider.com and subscribe to this daily email here.

Read the original article on Business Insider