Katie Ledecky will swim for gold at the 2021 Olympic Games – here’s how to watch the event on NBC

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Katie Ledecky
Olympic swimming events will be broadcast live on NBC and USA.

  • Tokyo Olympic swimming events started on July 24 and conclude July 31.
  • Swimming events will air on NBC and USA Network via live TV streaming services.
  • On the USA team, expectations are high for Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel.

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Swimming events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics started on July 24 and continue daily until July 31. Live coverage will be broadcast on NBC and the USA network.

The USA team has several strong competitors in women’s and men’s divisions, but all eyes will be on Katie Ledecky when she gets in the water. Ledecky already has an impressive collection of five gold medals and one silver medal coming into the Tokyo Olympics. If she snags three more gold medals in Tokyo, Ledecky will tie swimming legend, Jenny Thompson, as the winningest female US Olympian of all time.

In the men’s division, Caeleb Dressel is expected to lead the pack after his impressive showing at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Dressel earned two gold medals during the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

During the first three days of swimming events, the USA team earned three gold medals. In an unexpected victory, 17-year-old Alaskan Lydia Jacoby took home the gold medal for her performance in the women’s 100m breaststroke. For the men’s swimming division, Americans earned a top podium spot in the 400m individual medley and the 4x100m freestyle relay.

Katie Ledecky posted the fastest qualifying times in 200m and 1500m freestyle, the Chicago Sun-Times reports. On July 27, the women’s finals for both events will air live during prime time coverage on NBC.

How to watch Olympic swimming

Live broadcasts of Olympic swimming events are split between two channels: USA and NBC. For both men’s and women’s events, you can watch the preliminary heats on USA and the finals on NBC. Swimming heats will air in the mornings starting around 6 a.m. ET, and final races will air later in the evening during primetime coverage.

If you already have access to NBC and USA through a pay-TV provider, you can also stream every swimming event live via the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com.

If you don’t have cable, you can get NBC and USA through a variety of live TV streaming services. Sling TV is the cheapest subscription service for watching all the Olympic swimming events. New members can get their first month for just $10 (regularly $35). NBC is only offered in select markets, however, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, and YouTube TV are additional live streaming services with access to both channels for watching Olympic swimming, but these options are more expensive at $65/month each.

TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)

Viewers who can’t tune into events live can stay caught up on the action by catching highlights and primetime coverage on NBC. For free swimming highlights and videos from additional Olympic events, you can download the Peacock app or visit NBCOlympics.com.

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Men’s Olympic swimming schedule

Caeleb Dresse stands during Olympic trials in 2021.
Caeleb Dressel.

July 27

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:17 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Heats) 7:37 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 9:49 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:21 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:26 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
200m Backstroke (Heats) 6:25 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:15 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:04 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 10:37 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 11:08 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:16 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:50 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:11 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC

Women’s Olympic swimming schedule

Katie Ledecky at the 2021 Olympic Trials
Katie Ledecky.

July 27

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:57 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:52 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:34 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:53 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 10:28 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:31 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
800m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Heats) 7:08 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:24 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:36 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:46 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:32 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC
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How to watch gymnastics at the Tokyo Olympics – the finals are free to stream on Peacock

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Simone Biles.
Simone Biles at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

  • The 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition started on July 23 and concludes on August 3.
  • Select events featuring Team USA can be streamed for free via Peacock.
  • NBC is rebroadcasting portions of its gymnastics coverage during primetime.

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Gymnastics are one of the most anticipated events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The qualification subdivisions started on July 23 and the last gymnastics final is on August 3. Coverage will be rebroadcast during primetime on NBC, and you can stream select events live on Peacock for free.

Women will compete on four apparatuses: balance beam, floor exercise, uneven bars, and vault. Men will compete on six apparatuses: floor exercise, horizontal bar, parallel bars, pommel horse, rings, and vault.

Simone Biles is looking to repeat her successful performance at the 2016 Rio Olympics where she won four gold medals and one bronze medal. If the Olympic favorite earns gold again in the all-around, she will become the first female athlete with back-to-back wins in that event since 1968.

Team USA earned a spot in the women’s team final, although the Russian Olympic Committee received a higher score during the qualification event. On July 27, the women’s team final will air live at 6:45 a.m. ET on Peacock. The highly anticipated Olympic event will replay that night in primetime at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

How to watch Olympic gymnastics

Complete coverage of the 2020 Olympic gymnastics competition is available to stream live on the NBCOlympics website or NBC sports app if you have a pay-TV provider with access to NBC. Since most of the gymnastics events occur early in the morning, NBC is rebroadcasting select portions during their primetime coverage.

Outside of NBC, Peacock is streaming all of the gymnastics finals live for free. You can sign up for a free plan at the Peacock website.

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If you’re looking to watch NBC’s primetime coverage without cable, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling’s Blue plan is the most budget-friendly of the bunch at $35/month, and new customers can get their first month for only $10. That said, NBC is only available in select markets, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)

Women’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

Simone Biles
Simone Biles.

July 27

Event Time Where to watch
Team Final 6:45 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Team Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 29

Event Time Where to watch
All-Around Final 6:50 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

All-Around Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 1

Event Time Where to watch
Vault and Uneven Bars Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Vault and Uneven Bars Finals 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Floor Exercise Final 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Floor Exercise Final 9:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Balance Beam Final 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Balance Beam Final (Rebroadcast) 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET NBC

Men’s Olympic gymnastics schedule

sam mikulak
Sam Mikulak.

July 26

Event Time Where to watch
Team Final 6 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Team Final 8:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 28

Event Time Where to watch
All-Around Final 6:15 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

All-Around Final 8 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 1

Event Time Where to watch
Floor Exercise and Pommel Horse Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Floor Exercise and Pommel Horse Finals 4:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 2

Event Time Where to watch
Rings and Vault Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Rings and Vault Finals 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

August 3

Event Time Where to watch
Parallel and Horizontal Bar Finals 4 a.m. ET

Peacock, NBCOlympics.com, NBC Sports App

Parallel Bar Final 2:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Horizontal Bar Final 9:30 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
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How to watch swimming at the Tokyo Olympics – the qualifying heats begin on July 24

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Katie Ledecky
Olympic swimming events will be broadcast live on NBC and USA.

  • Tokyo Olympic swimming events start on July 24 and conclude July 31.
  • Swimming events will air on USA and NBC via live TV streaming services.
  • On the USA team, expectations are high for Katie Ledecky and Caeleb Dressel.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyTV (small)

Swimming events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics start on July 24 and continue daily until July 31. Live coverage will be broadcast on NBC and the USA network.

The USA team has several strong competitors in women’s and men’s divisions, but all eyes will be on Katie Ledecky when she gets in the water. Ledecky already has an impressive collection of five gold medals and one silver medal coming into the Tokyo Olympics. If she snags three more gold medals in Tokyo, Ledecky will tie swimming legend Jenny Thompson as the winningest female US Olympian of all time.

In the men’s division, Caeleb Dressel is expected to lead the pack after his impressive showing at the 2019 FINA World Championships. Dressel earned two gold medals during the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

How to watch Olympic swimming

Live broadcasts of Olympic swimming events are split between two channels: USA and NBC. For both men’s and women’s events, you can watch the preliminary heats on USA and the finals on NBC. Swimming heats will air in the mornings starting around 6 a.m. ET, and final races will air later in the evening during primetime coverage.

If you already have access to NBC and USA through a pay-TV provider, you can also stream every swimming event live via the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com.

If you don’t have cable, you can get NBC and USA through a variety of live TV streaming services. Sling TV is the cheapest subscription service for watching all the Olympic swimming events. New members can get their first month for just $10 (regularly $35). NBC is only offered in select markets, however, so be sure to check Sling’s website for availability first.

FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, and YouTube TV are additional live streaming services with access to both channels for watching Olympic swimming, but these options are more expensive at $65/month each.

TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)

Viewers who can’t tune into events live can stay caught up on the action by catching highlights and primetime coverage on NBC. For free swimming highlights and videos from additional Olympic events, you can download the Peacock app or visit NBCOlympics.com.

(Free Plan) (small)

Men’s Olympic swimming schedule

Caeleb Dresse stands during Olympic trials in 2021.
Caeleb Dressel.

July 24

Event Time Channel
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 7:55 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 9:52 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:33 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:22 a.m. ET USA
100m Backstroke (Heats) 7:19 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:10 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:31 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:05 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:29 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:43 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:17 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Heats) 7:37 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 9:49 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:21 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:26 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
200m Backstroke (Heats) 6:25 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:15 a.m. ET USA
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:04 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 10:37 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 11:08 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:50 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:16 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 6:48 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:50 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:11 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 9:44 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC

Women’s Olympic swimming schedule

Katie Ledecky at the 2021 Olympic Trials
Katie Ledecky.

July 24

Event Time Channel
100m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
400m Individual Medley (Heats) 7:30 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 8:15 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:40 p.m. ET NBC
400m Individual Medley (Final) 10:12 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Freestyle Relay (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC

July 25

Event Time Channel
100m Backstroke (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
100m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:59 a.m. ET USA
400m Freestyle (Heats) 7:39 a.m. ET USA
100m Butterfly (Final) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 9:50 p.m. ET NBC
400m Freestyle (Final) 10:20 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:53 p.m. ET NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
200m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Individual Medley (Heats) 6:56 a.m. ET USA
1500m Freestyle (Heats) 7:32 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:30 p.m. ET NBC
100m Backstroke (Final) 9:51 p.m. ET NBC
100m Breaststroke (Final) 10:17 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Semifinals) 10:58 p.m. ET NBC

July 27

Event Time Channel
200m Butterfly (Heats) 6:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Freestyle (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Semifinals) 9:57 p.m. ET NBC
200m Individual Medley (Final) 10:45 p.m. ET NBC
1500m Freestyle (Final) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC

July 28

Event Time Channel
100m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Heats) 6:52 a.m. ET USA
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Heats) 7:34 a.m. ET USA
100m Freestyle (Semifinals) 9:53 p.m. ET NBC
200m Butterfly (Final) 10:28 p.m. ET NBC
200m Breaststroke (Semifinals) 10:54 p.m. ET NBC
4x200m Freestyle Relay (Final) 11:31 p.m. ET NBC

July 29

Event Time Channel
800m Freestyle (Heats) 6:02 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Heats) 7:08 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Heats) 7:28 a.m. ET USA
200m Breaststroke (Final) 9:41 p.m. ET NBC
100m Freestyle (Final) 9:59 p.m. ET NBC
200m Backstroke (Semifinals) 10:35 p.m. ET NBC

July 30

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Heats) 6:24 a.m. ET USA
4x100m Medley Relay (Heats) 8:36 a.m. ET USA
200m Backstroke (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
800m Freestyle (Final) 9:46 p.m. ET NBC
50m Freestyle (Semifinals) 10:32 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay, Mixed (Final) 10:43 p.m. ET NBC

July 31

Event Time Channel
50m Freestyle (Final) 9:37 p.m. ET NBC
4x100m Medley Relay (Final) 10:36 p.m. ET NBC
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How to watch basketball at the Tokyo Olympics, including the new 3-on-3 tournament

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Kevin Durant dribbles for USA Basketball.
Kevin Durant is one of the many NBA stars playing in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

  • The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature men’s and women’s tournaments for 5-on-5 and 3-on-3 basketball.
  • Olympic basketball games will be spread across NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.
  • The NBC sports app will stream every game, and US men’s games will also stream live on Peacock ($5/month).

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyPremium (Monthly Plan) (small)TV (small)

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics will feature professional basketball players from the top international leagues as well as the debut of 3-on-3 events, an Olympic first. Twelve nations have qualified for the traditional men’s and women’s 5-on-5 tournaments, while eight teams will play in men’s and women’s 3-on-3 events.

Players from the NBA, WNBA and other professional basketball leagues from around the world will compete in the 5-on-5 tournament. The US men’s team, a perennial favorite, is led by stars like Kevin Durant and Damian Lillard, but they’ll have to face top international talent like Rudy Gobert of France and Luka Doncic of Slovenia. The US women’s basketball team has won six consecutive Olympic gold medals dating back to 1996. This year’s squad is led by stars like Diana Taurasi, Breanna Stewart, and Brittney Griner.

The 3-on-3 basketball events will use a different format than traditional basketball, with shots being counted as one and two points, rather than two and three points. Teams win by scoring 21 points, or by leading after 10 minutes.

The 3-on-3 teams will play each other in a round-robin format to determine seeding for the medal tournament. The 5-on-5 teams are separated into three groups for match play leading to a final tournament.

How to watch Olympic basketball

Nigeria's Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States' Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade
Nigeria’s Atonye Nyingifa (R) vies with United States’ Katie Lou Samuelson during the FIBA Women’s Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between Nigeria and USA, on February 9, 2020, in Belgrade.

Olympic basketball coverage begins with 3-on-3 events on July 23; 5-on-5 match play begins on July 24. To watch Olympic basketball you’ll need access to NBC’s family of networks. Select games will air on NBC, NBC Sports, USA, and CNBC.

If you already subscribe to a pay-TV provider with access to NBC’s channels, you can stream all Olympic basketball events through the NBC Sports app or NBCOlympics.com. This is the best way to catch all the action live, as a lot of the broadcast coverage will be shown as replays.

In addition, all US men’s basketball games will be streamed live on Peacock Premium, NBC’s standalone streaming service. Peacock Premium starts at $5 a month for ad-supported streaming.

Premium (Monthly Plan) (small)

If you’re not already subscribed to NBC channels through your cable provider, you can sign up for a live TV streaming service to follow Olympic basketball online.

Sling TV is one of the most affordable options, starting at $35 a month for Sling Blue with NBC, NBC Sports, and USA ($10 for new subscribers), and an additional $17 for CNBC and the Olympic Channel, which require extra sports and news packages. That’s $52 in total, or $27 if you’re a new Sling subscriber.

TV (small)

Other live TV options – like YouTube TV, FuboTV, and Hulu + Live TV – also include access to the necessary NBC stations but, while they all feature more channels than Sling, they’re also more expensive with prices starting at $65/month each. If you’re just signing up to watch the Tokyo Games, Sling is a more economical option.

TV (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (Starter Plan) (small)

Men’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Kevin Durant of Team USA
Draymond Green and Kevin Durant of Team USA basketball.

July 25

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. France (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC

July 26

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group A) 12 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
Argentina vs. Slovenia (Group C) 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
Australia vs. Italy (Group B) 11:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 3 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
France vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 5:15 p.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Iran (Group A) 11:30 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 8 a.m. ET Peacock, NBCOlympics.com
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 4 p.m. ET (replay) NBC
Australia vs. Germany (Group B) 10:30 a.m. ET USA

August 1

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Czech Republic (Group A) 1:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 2

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 12:40 a.m. ET Peacock

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals 10:45 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 12:15 a.m. ET Peacock

August 5

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals 6 p.m. ET (replay) USA
Men’s semifinals 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 10:30 p.m. ET NBC, Peacock

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 6 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 8

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal game 1:30 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

Women’s 5-on-5 Olympic basketball schedule

Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird for Team USA.
Diana Taurasi (left) and Sue Bird compete for Team USA.

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET USA
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 2:45 a.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Nigeria (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay) USA

July 30

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan (Group B) 12:40 a.m ET

USA

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 4:15 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

United States vs. Japan (Group B) 8 p.m. ET (replay)

NBC Sports Network

July 31

Event Time Channel
Canada vs. Spain (Group A) 11:30 p.m. p.m. ET USA

August 2

Event Time Channel
United States vs. France (Group B) 12:40 a.m. ET USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 4 p.m. ET (replay) USA
United States vs. France (Group B) 11 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 4

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals 6 p.m. ET on (replay) USA
Women’s quarterfinals 10 p.m. ET (replay) NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals 10 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals 4:15 p.m. and 9 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 8 p.m. ET NBC

August 8

Event Time Channel
Women’s gold medal game 9 a.m. ET (replay) USA

3-on-3 Olympic basketball schedule

3x3 basketball
A 3×3 basketball test event in Japan in May 2021.

July 24

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 12:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network
US vs. Mongolia and US vs. France 8 p.m. ET CNBC
Basketball and archery elimination rounds 10:40 p.m. ET USA

July 25

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s pool play 4 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 27

Event Time Channel
United States vs. Japan 4 a.m. ET CNBC
Men’s and women’s pool play 6:30 a.m. ET (tape delay) NBC Sports Network

July 28

Event Time Channel
Men’s and women’s semifinals games 5:30 a.m. ET USA
Gold and bronze medal games 8 p.m. ET NBC Sports
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Google made an elaborate 16-bit video game that pays homage to Japan hosting the Olympics, and you can play it for free right now

Google's Olympics-themed game, "Doodle Champion Island Games."
“Doodle Champion Island Games” is Google’s Olympics-themed game that’s free on the Google homepage.

  • In honor of the Olympics, Google just turned its homepage into a video game platform with one game.
  • “Doodle Champion Island Games” is a free, adorable homage to Japan’s history of video game production.
  • The game was produced in collaboration with Tokyo animation firm STUDIO4°C.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

With the Olympic Games kicking off this week, Google is paying homage to its host city of Tokyo with a full-on video game.

If you head over to Google’s homepage, you’ll find a play button that opens a surprisingly elaborate video game named “Doodle Champion Island Games.”

It costs nothing, is fun to play, and even remembers where you left off if you close the window.

Read more: Netflix’s new video-game strategy will live or die by how well it can create mega movie and TV franchises

The game – made in collaboration with Tokyo-based animation firm STUDIO4°C – is playable directly in-browser using the arrow keys and space bar. It stars an adorable calico cat named Lucky who’s able to participate in a variety of sporting events.

A table tennis event and a skateboarding event were standouts in the short time we spent with the game, but there’s a whole bunch more game in there – at least seven games in total, in addition to “extra hidden challenges,” according to Google’s blog post.

If nothing else, do yourself a favor and enjoy the aggressively charming intro video right here:

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 10 US colleges best-represented at the Tokyo Olympic Games

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI - JUNE 27: Jordan Chiles competes on the uneven bars during the Women's competition of the 2021 U.S. Gymnastics Olympic Trials at America’s Center on June 27, 2021 in St Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images)
First-time Olympic gymnast Jordan Chiles is also an incoming freshman at UCLA.

  • Polina Marinova is the founder of The Profile, a newsletter that profiles successful people and companies.
  • The following is a recent The Profile post, republished here with permission.
  • In it, she breaks down the top 10 US colleges that are sending the most alumni and athletes to the 2020 Olympics.

In March of 2020, Brooke Forde packed up and left campus as Stanford University and colleges around the nation paused in-person classes due to a global pandemic.

Then, she found out something else was being put on hold: The 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Forde, a student at Stanford, had also been a first-time Olympic hopeful. The last few months have served as a stress test for the 22-year-old swimmer, whose road to Tokyo has anything but straightforward. She overcame two COVID-19 scares, a mid-meet panic attack, and a nerve-wracking Olympic Trials experience.

Despite it all, she ultimately secured a spot on Team USA at the Olympic Games and got to say: “I’m Brooke Forde, and I’m a Tokyo Olympian.”

Joining her in Tokyo will be 31 other current and former Stanford athletes – among them swimmers Katie Ledecky, Simone Manuel, Torri Huske, and Regan Smith.

Stanford students and alumni will participate in swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, volleyball, gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, and track & field this year, according to information provided to The Profile by the US Olympic Committee.

The university has produced at least one medalist in every Olympics in which the US has competed since 1912, including a school-record 27 medals in 2016.

More than 75% of the 2020 US Olympic team competed in collegiate athletics at the varsity and club levels.

Here are the 10 US colleges that will be best-represented at the Olympic Games:

(Note: This list includes athletes who have already finished their collegiate careers, those currently competing, and incomers who have signed National Letters of Intent. If an athlete competed at two different schools, they have been counted at the school they have most recently attended.)

10. University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame.
University of Notre Dame.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Fencing, basketball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Mariel Zagunis, a Notre Dame alumna, is the most decorated US fencer of all time. A two-time Olympic gold medalist, Zagunis will embark on her fifth consecutive trip to the Olympics this year.

“I’ve done a lot for my sport already,” she said. “I’m not trying to prove anything to anybody except to myself that I’m still a good fencer and I’m capable of beating the best in the world and becoming Olympic champion once again.”

Read a profile on Zagunis here.

9. Penn State University

Penn State University
Penn State University.

Number of athletes: 10

Events: Soccer, fencing, wrestling, volleyball, rugby, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: When she was growing up, Alyssa Naeher had dreams of making it to the WNBA.

“If I’m being honest, basketball was my first love,” said Naeher, an ’09 Penn State graduate. “I wanted to play basketball at UConn. We obviously didn’t really have a [pro women’s soccer league] of our own yet.”

Today, Naeher has channeled that same passion into become a confident and record-setting goalkeeper for the Chicago Red Stars and United States Women’s National Soccer Team. “The only thing I can control is my effort on the field – working hard, keeping my head down, being there, pushing myself, pushing my teammates, and trying to get better,” she said.

Read a profile on Naeher here.

8. University of Oregon

University of Oregon
University of Oregon.

Number of athletes: 11

Events: Softball, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Freshman Micah Williams is University of Oregon’s star sprinter. He has already won a national indoor championship after tying a school record with a 60-meter time of 6.49 seconds. Williams and fellow Olympian Cravon Gillespie became the first Oregon men’s sprinters in program history to make the US Olympic team.

Read a profile on Williams here.

7. University of Florida

University of Florida campus

Number of athletes: 14

Events: Softball, basketball, swimming, baseball, and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Caeleb Dressel has been called “swimming’s reluctant star” for a reason. Dressel constantly draws comparisons to legendary Olympian Michael Phelps, and he couldn’t be less interested in external expectations or comparisons.

“I swim different events than Michael,” he said. “I’m not chasing someone else’s goals. I want to chase my own.”

Dressel, who graduated from the University of Florida in 2018, has claimed 15 world championship medals, 13 of them gold, since 2017, making him one of the biggest stars in swimming. At the Tokyo Olympics, he is a favorite to win six gold medals for Team USA.

Read a profile of Dressel here.

6. University of Georgia

University of Georgia
The University of Georgia.

Number of athletes: 15

Events: Swimming and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Swimmer Allison Schmitt is an eight-time Olympic medalist with four golds, two silvers, and two bronzes. Schmitt qualified for her fourth Olympics, which puts her at one short of the record for American women’s swimming.

Schmitt, who graduated from the University of Georgia in 2013, said, “This one is definitely the most emotional, and I think it’s special to be here at 31 [years old] and have everyone in the stands that’s here supporting me … and have been along on this journey the past four years.”

Read a profile on Schmitt here.

5. University of Southern California

usc
The statue called ‘Tommy Trojan’, the mascot of USC from 1930 located at the center of the USC campus on September 23, 2015, three weeks before the USC announced they have fired Trojans football coach Steve Sarkisian.

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Water polo, swimming, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Isaiah Jewett may be a track star at USC, but he’s also a student who needs to complete his homework. In June, he qualified for his first Olympic Games after finishing second in the men’s 800-meter run. In his post-race press conference, he revealed that although he was excited, he was also really worried about completing his 10-page paper that was due in just a few hours.

“My legs feel really good. Mentally I’m tired. I need to sleep. I have a 10-page essay due tonight,” he said. “I’m mentally trying to re-focus and get that done because it’s due tonight and my teacher didn’t give me an extension.” He submitted his paper at 11:50 p.m. that night.

Read a profile on Jewett here.

4. University of California, Berkeley

UC Berkeley cover image
UC Berkeley campus

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Swimming, water polo, rowing, soccer, golf, rugby, table tennis, and softball

Athlete Spotlight: Twenty-four-year-old Collin Morikawa has already made history. Earlier this month, he became the first golfer in history to win his debut at two different major events. Additionally, he became the eighth golfer ever to win two majors before turning 25. More so than anything, Morikawa is really charismatic.

Here’s how writer Kyle Porter described him: “He’s clean-cut and buttoned-up. He’s fresh and likable. He has not made any public mistakes nor had to watch himself suffer.” Morikawa is considered one of the top US golfers set to compete at the Olympics. This ’19 Cal graduate is definitely one to watch.

Read a profile on Morikawa here.

3. University of Texas

University of Texas
University of Texas

Number of athletes: 16

Events: Diving, swimming, rowing, basketball, softball, volleyball (court), and track & field

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Windle, who is returning for a fifth year at the University of Texas, executed a near perfect dive during the Olympic trials. After three attempts at qualifying for the Olympic Games, Windle’s efforts finally paid off. Windle has a long history of not giving up, though.

Born in Cambodia, Windle was placed in an orphanage about a year after his parents died tragically. Meanwhile, a retired naval officer named Jerry Windle wanted to start a family but struggled to adopt as a single, gay man in the US He read about someone who had adopted a child from Cambodia, and five months later, he found and adopted Jordan, who had been suffering from malnutrition, scabies, intestinal parasites and severe infections. Today, the father-son duo are inseparable.

“I hope that Jordan’s story, our story, inspires people to give children the opportunity to do amazing things,” Jerry said.

Read a profile on Windle here.

2. UCLA

UCLA

Number of athletes: 21

Events: Gymnastics, soccer, softball, baseball, basketball, tennis, volleyball (court), beach volleyball, and water polo

Athlete Spotlight: Jordan Chiles has a lot going on in 2021. She is an incoming freshman at UCLA, and she’s also a first-time Olympian competing alongside teammates including gymnastics legend Simone Biles. Chiles is expected to be a Tokyo breakout star three years after nearly quitting gymnastics.

“I didn’t think the sport wanted me anymore,” she said. “So I went in the opposite direction.” She had lost all confidence and motivation – until she had a talk with Biles. Biles took on the role of Chiles’s big sister, repeating to her these three words: “You belong here.”

Read a profile on Chiles here.

1. Stanford University

Stanford University

Number of athletes: 32

Events: Swimming, artistic swimming, water polo, sailing, rowing, beach volleyball, volleyball (court), gymnastics, cycling, soccer, fencing, track & field

Athlete Spotlight: At the 2016 Olympics, Katie Ledecky was an incoming freshman at Stanford University. In 2021, she’s a recent grad with a degree in psychology and a total of six Olympic medals (five gold, one silver). In the last year, the 24-year-old competitive swimmer has done more solo training than ever before. It makes the already unusual run-up to the Tokyo Olympics even more so for the most dominant swimmer on the planet.

“The most important expectations are the ones that I have for myself,” she said. “I do a pretty good job of sticking to those and not seeing what kinds of medal counts or times that people are throwing out about what I could accomplish if everything goes perfectly.”

Read a profile on Ledecky here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to watch soccer at the Tokyo Olympics – women’s group matches begin on July 21

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USWNT US Women's National Team Soccer
US women’s national soccer team members Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe celebrate.

  • Olympic soccer will begin before the opening ceremonies with women’s group matches starting July 21.
  • Games will air on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel via cable and live streaming services.
  • The women’s gold medal match is August 5, while the men’s gold medal will be decided on August 7.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyTV (small)

Soccer will be one of the first sports to begin competition at the Tokyo Olympics, with women’s group stage matches starting on July 21 and the men’s matches starting on July 22. The Tokyo Opening Ceremonies will be held on July 23 and Olympic soccer competition will continue through August 7.

A total of 24 nations will compete in soccer during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with 16 qualifying men’s teams and 12 women’s teams. You can watch select games on USA, NBC Sports, and the Olympic Channel through cable and live streaming services.

While Olympic men’s soccer has been restricted to players 23-years-old and younger since 1992, the one-year delay of the 2020 games led to the age limit being increased to 24. Men’s teams can also name up to three senior players above the age limit to compete in the Olympics. Brazil won the men’s soccer gold medal as the host nation in 2016, led by international superstar Neymar.

Women’s teams don’t have roster restrictions, and the US women’s national soccer team, or USWNT, is bringing back most of its players from the 2019 World Cup championship squad. The Americans plan to return to gold medal form after losing in the quarter-finals of the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The US Men’s soccer team was eliminated from Olympic contention after a loss to Honduras in a June qualifying tournament. USWNT has won four Olympic gold medals including a 2012 victory over Japan, while the men’s team has never won a gold medal and hasn’t qualified for the Olympics since 2008.

How to watch Olympic soccer

You can watch select Olympic soccer games on NBC Sports, USA, the Olympic Channel, Telemundo, and NBC Universo. Most of the games in Tokyo will air during the early morning hours in the US. The most important Olympic soccer matches will air on USA and NBC Sports Network.

If you have an authenticated pay-TV provider with access to the required NBC stations, you can stream every Olympic soccer match via NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app.

If you don’t have a cable provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like Sling TV, FuboTV, Hulu + Live TV, or YouTube TV. Sling TV is the most affordable choice to get every Olympic soccer channel. The Sling Blue plan starts at $35/month for access to NBC, NBCSN, and USA. New subscribers can get their first month for just $10. You can add the Olympic channel for an additional $11/month with the Sports Extra package.

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If you can’t watch the games live, NBC will provide daily highlights and evening recaps of each day’s events. In addition to primetime coverage on NBC, you can visit NBCOlympics.com or download Peacock, NBC’s streaming service, to watch free soccer highlights and clips from other sports.

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Women’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of women’s soccer matches for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 21

Event Time Channel
Great Britain vs. Chile (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
China vs. Brazil (Group F) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
United States vs. Sweden (Group G) 4:30 a.m. ET USA
Japan vs. Canada (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

Zambia vs. Netherlands (Group F) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Australia vs. New Zealand (Group G) 7:30 a.m. ET USA

July 24

Event Time Channel
Chile vs. Canada (Group E) 3:30 a.m. ET TBA
China vs. Zambia (Group F) 4 a.m. ET TBA
Sweden vs. Australia (Group G) 4:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network
Japan vs. Great Britain (Group E) 6:30 a.m. ET TBA
Netherlands vs. Brazil (Group F) 7 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. United States 7:30 a.m. NBC Sports Network and Telemundo

July 27

Event Time Channel
Sweden vs. New Zealand (Group G)

4 a.m. ET

TBA
United States v Australia (Group G) 4 a.m. ET USA
Chile vs. Japan (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Canada vs. Great Britain (Group E) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Brazil vs. Zambia (Group F) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Netherlands vs. China (Group F)

7:30 a.m. ET

TBA

July 30

Event Time Channel
Women’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Women’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Women’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET TBA

August 2

Event Time Channel
Women’s semifinals one 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s semifinals two 7 a.m. ET USA

August 5

Event Time Channel
Women’s bronze medal match 4 a.m. ET USA
Women’s gold medal match 10 p.m. ET USA

Men’s Olympic soccer schedule

Below, you can find a full schedule of men’s soccer matches announced for the Tokyo Olympics.

Games with TBA (to be announced) listed in the channel column do not have a broadcast network identified yet. It’s unclear if these games will end up being televised. We’ll update the schedule with additional times and channels as they are announced.

July 22

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Spain (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Mexico vs. France (Group A) 4 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo
New Zealand vs. South Korea (Group B) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Cote d’Ivoire vs. Saudi Arabia (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Argentina vs. Australia (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET Olympic Channel, Universo
Japan vs. South Africa (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Honduras vs. Romania (Group B) 7 a.m. ET Olympic Channel
Brazil vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET USA, Telemundo

July 25

Event Time Channel
Egypt vs. Argentina (Group C) 3:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
France vs. South Africa (Group A) 4 a.m. ET TBA
New Zealand vs. Honduras (Group B) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Brazil vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Australia vs. Spain (Group C) 6:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Universo
Japan vs. Mexico (Group A) 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network, Telemundo
Romania vs. South Korea (Group B) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Saudi Arabia vs. Germany (Group D) 7:30 a.m. ET TBA

July 28

Event Time Channel
Saudi Arabia vs. Brazil (Group D) 4 a.m. ET Universo
Germany vs. Cote d’Ivoire (Group D) 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Romania vs. New Zealand (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
South Korea vs. Honduras (Group B) 4:30 a.m. ET Telemundo
Australia vs. Egypt (Group C) 7 a.m. ET TBA
Spain vs. Argentina (Group C) 7 a.m. ET Universo
France vs. Japan (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET

NBC Sports Network

South Africa vs. Mexico (Group A) 7:30 a.m. ET Telemundo

July 31

Event Time Channel
Men’s quarterfinals one 4 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s quarterfinals two 5 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals three 6 a.m. ET TBA
Men’s quarterfinals four 7 a.m. ET USA

August 3

Event Time Channel
Men’s semifinals one 4 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network
Men’s semifinals two 7 p.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 6

Event Time Channel
Men’s bronze medal match 7 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network

August 7

Event Time Channel
Men’s gold medal match 7:30 a.m. ET NBC Sports Network
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How to watch the Tokyo Olympics, starting with the opening ceremony on July 23

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Simone Biles
Simone Biles will lead the US Women’s Gymnastics team at her second Olympic Games.

  • The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo will run from July 23 to August 8 after a one-year delay.
  • The opening ceremony will broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET, with a primetime replay.
  • NBC will provide live coverage on its networks, along with highlights on its Peacock streaming service.

The Tokyo Olympic Games will hold its opening ceremonies on July 23 after a one-year delay, welcoming thousands of athletes from 205 countries and states. The international competition will continue through August 8 with events from 33 different sports.

NBC will be the primary broadcaster for the Olympics in the United States, including the opening ceremonies and daily coverage. The Tokyo Opening Ceremony will be broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC, with a primetime replay scheduled for 7:30 p.m. ET. The opening ceremony will include special performances by Japanese artists, the parade of nations, and the lighting of the Olympic torch.

Live broadcasts and streamed events from Tokyo will be available every day on NBC and other NBC affiliate networks. You can find a daily schedule for all 33 sports at NBCOlympics.com, but the broadcast details for each event haven’t been set yet. Free highlights will also be available on Peacock, NBC’s streaming service.

Because the event was originally planned for last year, this year’s Summer Olympics are still being called the Tokyo 2020 Games. Japan hosted the Winter Olympics in 1998, and last hosted the summer games in 1964. International fans can’t enter the country for the Olympics because of ongoing concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic, but local spectators will attend with restricted crowds.

How to watch the Olympics

Sha'Carri Richardson celebrates winning the Women's 100 Meter final on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials
Sha’Carri Richardson was a favorite among US Olympics qualifiers, but her place on the team is in doubt following reports of a positive cannabis test.

The opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics will be broadcast live on July 23 at 6:55 a.m. ET on NBC. The ceremony will be rebroadcast multiple times starting at 7:30 p.m. ET on July 23 for primetime audiences You can watch the opening ceremony on your local NBC affiliate station, or stream it via NBCOlympics.com and the NBC Sports app.

Olympic coverage will be spread across multiple NBC Networks, including NBC Sports Network, CNBC, the Olympic Channel, the Golf Channel, and USA; Telemundo and Universo will carry Spanish language coverage. NBC’s streaming service Peacock will feature daily highlights, docuseries, and commentary for free.

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The NBC Sports and Peacock apps are available on iOS and Android devices, Roku, Amazon Fire, Xbox, web browsers, and select smart TVs. You can visit NBCOlympics.com to view the daily Olympics schedule, but NBC still has to announce which channels will broadcast specific events. We’ll update this page with detailed schedule information once it’s available.

If you don’t already have a cable or TV provider, you can use a live TV streaming service like YouTube TV, Hulu Live TV, Sling TV, or FuboTV to watch channels like NBC, NBC Sports, and USA. Of those options, Sling’s Blue plan is the most affordable at $35 a month ($10 for your first month).

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Key dates for the Tokyo Olympics

Katie Ledecky
US swimming star Katie Ledecky has won five Olympic gold medals, the most for any female swimmer.

  • July 21 – Olympic competition begins with softball and soccer matches
  • July 23 – Tokyo Olympics Opening Ceremony
  • July 24 to July 31 – Swimming: daily coverage at 9:30 p.m. ET
  • July 27 – Gymnastics: Women’s team final, 6:45 a.m. ET
  • July 29 – Gymnastics: Women’s individual all-around, 6:50 a.m. ET
  • July 31 – Track and Field: Women’s 100-meter finals, 6 a.m. ET
  • August 1 – Track and Field: Men’s 100-meter finals, 6 a.m. ET
  • August 6 – Basketball: Men’s gold medal game, 10:30 p.m. ET
  • August 8 – Last day of the Tokyo Olympics
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The world really, really needs the Olympics this year

tokyo olympics
People in Japan wear masks due to the COVID-19 pandemic in front of Olympics rings.

  • The Summer Olympics in Japan were rescheduled from 2020 to August 2021.
  • Despite concerns over the COVID pandemic and the big logistical work needed to put on the Games, they should go on.
  • The Olympics can be a symbol of hope, and hope is what we need right now.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

We really, really need the Olympics this year.

After an unprecedented period apart, holding the Olympics would be a powerful symbol that the world can start to come back together again. They can be a beacon of hope and proof of progress against the pandemic.

The Games must go on.

There are still a lot of challenges. The virus continues to claim thousands of lives around the world each day and has overwhelmed the healthcare system in places like India and Brazil. The distribution of vaccines is moving out far too slowly in most countries, including in Japan. And the organizing effort to bring in thousands of athletes from hundreds of countries to safely compete in a multi-week event will be enormous.

The Games were already pushed back from their original 2020 date, and for these reasons, there are many calling for the Olympics to be delayed again..

But while these challenges are real and the undertaking enormous, it’s important to remember what the games represent. They are a singularly powerful symbol of our common humanity. While the realities of politics are sometimes injected into the event – whether through boycotts, cheating scandals, or the occasional friction on the field – the Olympics show us that at our best it is possible for the whole world to play by the same rules.

The Games are also one of the most iconic illustrations of what humans can achieve by setting seemingly impossible goals and expending tireless effort. That is a desperately needed spirit at this moment. After the harrowing days of COVID-19, we could all use a confidence boost. The exhilarating experience of the Games can reassure us that new possibilities lay beyond the horizon.

The head of communications at the International Olympic Committee, Christian Klaue recently told me that organizers plan to build the event around a “light at the end of the tunnel” theme. This does not mean we have emerged from the darkness. The Games should not serve as a celebration or a victory lap around the track. After more than a year and a half, weariness has started to take hold. The Games can help to reinvigorate spirits for what will hopefully be the final stretch.

Under normal conditions, international coordination on the scale of the Games is an extraordinarily challenging endeavor. Klaue says the Olympics very likely, “has the most stakeholders of any event in the world.” Yet, now, even the most basic health and logistical questions result in major divisions, taking much longer to resolve. From travel to housing, meals to medical facilities, the complexity has been compounded.

Yet, we have learned and advanced enough at this point to stage a global event safely. Smaller sporting events have been able to bring in international participants and sports leagues like the NBA have implemented sophisticated contract tracing programs. Organizers have the ability to vaccinate athletes, staff, and media. Using high-quality, rapid tests, it is possible to verify on site that no one entering the facilities is infected.

In many ways COVID-19 has torn the world apart. Countries have shut their borders, hoarded vaccines, and failed to coordinate an effective global response. There is a real risk that the pandemic will only further serve to exacerbate existing inequity and divisions for years to come. Stitching that frayed fabric back together needs to start now. I can think of no better opportunity to rebuild ties than through the Olympics.

There is also a need to start imagining what comes next. The Olympics provide us with the chance to step back from the stress and struggles we presently face. What can we do better or just differently? Looking out across so much loss and devastation, one can’t help but begin to reimagine how we live.

Not since the end of World War II have we been given an opening to rethink international institutions and ideals. Steps were taken back then with the United Nations and other multilateral organizations to better manage conflicts and global crises. Clearly, there is a lot more work needed and there is no more opportune time than during a crisis.

So, let’s meet this momentous moment. Not only hold the Games, but use them to start a new dialogue with the world. What does our collective future look like and how do we get there? If we can agree to play sports, there has to be more we can do together. Let’s hold the games not because we need a break or a bright spot during a bleak period in history. Let’s hold them because they offer a unique chance for global compromise and to begin imagining how we change the way the world works.

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Superstar gymnast Simone Biles is leaving Nike for a new partnership with Gap-owned athletic brand Athleta

Simone Biles
Simone Biles.

  • Gymnast Simone Biles is leaving Nike for a partnership with Gap-owned Athleta.
  • Biles told The Wall Street Journal that she’s attracted to Athleta’s values and female-focused team.
  • Sprinter Allyson Felix also signed a deal with Athleta following a high-profile split with Nike.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Gymnast Simone Biles is leaving Nike for a new partnership with apparel brand Athleta.

The five-time Olympic medalist has signed a deal with the Gap-owned athleticwear company that includes her own line of performance wear, according to The Wall Street Journal’s Louise Radnofsky. Biles told The Journal that Athleta’s core values and female-focused team led her to sign with the company.

“I felt like it wasn’t just about my achievements, it’s what I stood for and how they were going to help me use my voice and also be a voice for females and kids,” she said. “I feel like they also support me, not just as an athlete, but just as an individual outside of the gym and the change that I want to create, which is so refreshing.”

The Journal notes that despite Biles’ sponsorship deal with Nike, which she signed in 2015, she has not been a major face of the brand, making only small appearances in advertisements. Biles is currently the best female gymnast in the world and is widely considered to be the greatest of all time.

Biles has 25 world-title medals, the most in the world – she’s competed in just one Olympics, in Rio de Janeiro in 2016, where she took home four gold medals and one bronze. She plans to compete in the Tokyo games, which will be held this summer after being pushed due to the pandemic.

A spokesperson for Nike did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. A Nike spokesperson told The Journal that “Simone Biles is an incredible athlete and we wish her the very best.” The company “will continue to champion, celebrate and evolve to support our female athletes,” the spokesperson said.

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Biles decision to leave the Nike roster follows several instances of female athletes reporting issues with the company. Allyson Felix, one of the most decorated sprinters in history, accused the company of failing to support her decision to become a mother in a bombshell op-ed she wrote for The New York Times in May 2019. According to Felix, during contract negotiations that coincided with her pregnancy, Nike offered her a 70% pay cut and refused to guarantee that Felix wouldn’t be punished for being unable to perform her best after childbirth.

Felix signed a deal with Athleta in 2019.

Multiple other female runners, including Kara Goucher, Phoebe Wright, and Alysia Montaño, have spoke up about the pressure to perform during or immediately after their pregnancies or face reduced sponsorship payments from Nike. The company has since instituted a new maternity policy that does not penalize pregnant athletes.

In 2019, Mary Cain, a female sprinter who was signed to Nike’s high-profile Oregon Project track team, told The New York Times that she was pressured to get “thinner, and thinner, and thinner” at the detriment of her health. Nike launched an internal investigation and said it would make internal changes to better support female athletes.

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