Las Vegas has a new $4.3 billion crypto-friendly resort – take a tour inside the first new casino on the Strip in a decade

a rendering of the exterior of Resorts World Las Vegas
The exterior of Resorts World Las Vegas.

  • The Las Vegas Strip has a new hotel: the $4.3 billion Resorts World Las Vegas.
  • Resorts World has tech-forward amenities like “cashless wagering” and partnerships with Grubhub and Gemini.
  • Take a tour of the new hotel, which officially opened June 24.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
The Las Vegas Strip’s newest hotel officially opened on June 24: the $4.3 billion Resorts World Las Vegas.

people by a glowing Resorts World sphere
Resorts World Las Vegas.

The hotel was developed by Malaysia-based Genting Group and its official opening could not have come at a more fortuitous time as people begin traveling again.

People at the casino of Resorts World Las Vegas
The casino.

“A brand-new Las Vegas opening like Resorts World can drive increased visitation,” Barry Jonas, managing director of Truist Securities, told Katie Young and Contessa Brewer for CNBC. “As many customers looking to trial the new property also like to visit multiple properties during their stay.”

fireworks going off next to Resorts World Las Vegas
Fireworks on the opening night of Resorts World Las Vegas on June 24.

Source: CNBC

Any Las Vegas aficionado will know that a crowd-pleasing Las Vegas Strip hotel must have plenty of food, gambling, pool, and drinking options.

an empty Resorts World Las Vegas casino
Resorts World Las Vegas’ casino,

Luckily, Resorts World offers all four, often with a tech-forward twist.

Rolls-Royce Phantom on display with people walking by
A Rolls-Royce Phantom on display at Resorts World Las Vegas on June 24.

Let’s take a look inside.

crowds of people walking around Resorts World Las Vegas
Resorts World Las Vegas during the opening night.

Behind the flashy Resorts World sign lies a well-known hospitality company: Hilton.

people walking around Resorts World Las Vegas while a glowing ball displays the name of the hotel
Resorts World Las Vegas during its opening night on June 24.

In February 2020, the hospitality giant partnered with Resorts World Las Vegas to introduce three Hilton brands to the resort.

two beds with a view at Resorts World' Crockfords Las Vegas palace
Resorts World’ Crockfords Las Vegas chairman’s villa.

The three Hilton brands – Hilton Hotel and Resorts, LXR, and Conrad – make an appearance throughout the 3,500-room hotel.

rendering of Resorts World's Conrad Las Vegas lobby with large lights and people walking around
Resorts World’s Conrad Las Vegas lobby.

The hotel has 236 rooms under Hilton’s luxury segment, LXR.

ornate seating and a chandelier at Resorts World' Crockfords Las Vegas palace
Resorts World’ Crockfords Las Vegas palace.

Guests staying in these rooms will have their own entrance and lobby, and upgraded rooms, suites, and villas ranging from 550 square feet to a whopping 7,000 square feet.

workers at the lobby desk at Crockfords
The lobby for Crockfords.

Then there’s the Conrad segment, which includes 1,496 rooms and suites spanning from 550 square feet to 2,800 square feet.

Resorts World's Conrad Las Vegas premium queen bedroom with two beds and a view
Resorts World’s Conrad Las Vegas premium queen

Finally, the majority of the rooms – 1,774, to be exact – are made up of “Las Vegas Hilton at Resorts World” rooms ranging from 400 square feet to 3,300 square feet.

a bed with tables, chairs and a view at Resorts World's Las Vegas Hilton deluxe king room
Resorts World’s Las Vegas Hilton deluxe king room.

Besides Hilton, Resorts World has a long list of partnerships with recognizable names, such as the Kardashian-Jenner family in the form of a pop-up Kardashian Kloset, the family’s online clothing and accessory resale site.

a pool, gazebo, and seating at Resorts World' Crockfords Las Vegas palace
Resorts World’ Crockfords Las Vegas palace.

Not interested in raiding the celebrity powerhouse family’s closet?

a rendering of the Lily Ballroom with people mingling
The Lily Ballroom.

Resorts World also has a two-floor, 70,000-square-foot shopping venue for guests in need of retail therapy.

a rendering of the exterior of the Pepper store.
The Pepper store.

Besides the Kardashian family and Hilton partnerships, the hotel is also working with food ordering and delivery platform Grubhub.

a worker preparing food alone at Fuhu Shack behind a glass barrier
Fuhu Shack.

Guests can use the Grubhub app or scan the Grubhub QR codes located throughout the resort, to order food or retail items.

a dessert with colorful rainbow decorations
A dessert.

From there, the charge can be placed on the guests’ room or credit card.

a rendering of the Suns Out Buns Out store with graphic fried eggs
The Suns Out Buns Out store.

But that’s not the only tech-forward feature of the modern hotel.

a rendering of the gym and its machines
Resorts World Las Vegas’ gym

It’s 2021, so of course, Resorts World has cryptocurrency capabilities.

Resorts World's with shadows of people
Resorts World’s lobby

Resorts World has partnered with Gemini – a cryptocurrency platform founded by Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron Winklevoss – to turn the property into “one of the most crypto-friendly resorts on the Las Vegas Strip,” according to a press release.

a rendering of RedTail with TV screens, pool tables, games, and the bar
RedTail.

Like more modern hotels, Resorts World also uses mobile check-ins, an artificial intelligence concierge, and digital keys.

a rendering of Wally's Wine and Spirits
Wally’s Wine and Spirits.

The resort even has a tunnel that connects it to the Las Vegas Convention Center via Tesla cars.

a rendering of a of the high occupancy vehicles with passengers
One of the high occupancy vehicles.

Now, let’s take a look at Resorts World’s theater, which has space for 5,000 live entertainment fans or convention attendees.

a rendering of the lobby of the theater
The lobby of the theater.

The theater houses one of the biggest stages on the Vegas Strip, according to the resort.

a rendering of the theater
The theater.

In total, the stage spans 64 feet deep and 196 feet wide, totaling 13,550 square feet.

a rendering of the theater
The theater.

So far, headliners at the massive theater are set to include A-listers like Katy Perry, Carrie Underwood, Celine Dion, and Luke Bryan.

Miley Cyrus holding a microphone up while she performs at Ayu Dayclub
Miley Cyrus performing at Ayu Dayclub at Resorts World Las Vegas on July 4.

The property will also have 250,000 square feet worth of meeting spaces and ballrooms for folks headed to Sin City strictly for work purposes.

a rendering of the Jasmine Ballroom with people mingling
The Jasmine Ballroom.

Moving right along to everyone’s favorite part: the food.

a spread of different food
Food at Famous Foods.

Las Vegas has always been known for its bustling food and buffet scene, among other Vegas attributes.

a rendering of the exterior of Dawg House
The exterior of Dawg House.

Resorts World is no different, and the property will have over 40 food and drink options.

a rendering of the Suns Out Buns Out interior with egg looking chairs
The interior of the Suns Out Buns Out store.

Let’s start off with Famous Foods Street Eats, a 24,000-square-foot food hall with 16 stalls. Several of these stalls include Asian-inspired options and restaurants with Michelin Plate or Bib Gourmand recognition.

an empty Famous Foods Street Eats hall
Famous Foods Street Eats.

There’s even a speakeasy inside the food hall.

A rendering of the speakeasy
The speakeasy.

But don’t fret if a food hall isn’t your scene.

a rendering of the Neon Bar.
The Neon Bar.

Resorts World has a whole list of other food and drink options.

a rendering of shelves and products at Fred Segal's store
Fred Segal’s store.

This includes Genting Palace, an “old-world glamour” Cantonese eatery …

a rendering of the interior of Genting Palace
The interior of Genting Palace.

… sushi and teppanyaki hotspot Kusa Nori …

a rendering of the interior of Kusa Nori
Kusa Nori.

… vegan ice cream from Craig’s, an iconic Los Angeles eatery …

a rendering of the counter at Craig's
The interior of Craig’s.

… and RedTail, a game bar with food options.

a spread of food at Redtail
Food from Redtail.

Speaking of which, what would a Las Vegas resort be without bars?

a person standing on front of a bar adorned with neon lights
One of the bars in Resorts World Las Vegas

Resorts World also has several drinking spots, including Starlight on 66 with views of the city, Nashville-transplanted Dawg House Saloon and Sportsbook, and the “most technologically advanced nightclub in Las Vegas,” Zouk Nightclub.

a rendering of the entrance of Zouk Nightclub
The entrance of Zouk Nightclub.

There’ll even be a champagne-forward Gatsby’s Cocktail Lounge with live music and DJs.

lights hanging above the Gatsby's Cocktail Lounge
Gatsby’s Cocktail Lounge.

Like Resorts World’s theater, Zouk Nightclub and the hotel’s other club, Ayu Dayclub, will have recognizable headliners or residents like Zedd, Tiësto, Jack Harlow, and Madison Beer.

DJ Ruckus holding a microphone while performing at Ayu Dayclub
DJ Ruckus performing at Ayu Dayclub on July 4.

Now moving on to the casino. The 117,000-square-foot space is filled with all the classic gambling options, such as 1,400 slot machines, 30 poker tables, and 117 table games.

a rendering of the poker room and its tables and chairs
The poker room at Resorts World Las Vegas.

Resorts World’s casino even has cashless options, including “cashless wagering.”

a dealer at a table at the Resorts World Casino in front of slot machines
A dealer at the casino.

Think “tap-(or scan)-and-go,” but on a slot machine or at a table game.

a bar packed with people at Resorts World Las Vegas
Resorts World Las Vegas.

If you’ve been gambling indoors for a bit too long, go unwind at the 5.5-acres worth of pools, including everyone’s favorite, an infinity pool.

a view of the pool by the hotel
The cabana pool.

The seven pools also have what Resorts World calls the “largest pool deck in Las Vegas,” as evidenced by the rendering below.

A rendering of the pool complex
The pool complex.

And when it’s time for some rest and relaxation from all the Vegas chaos, head to the 27,000-square-foot spa.

a rendering of the beauty salon
The beauty salon.

If these amenities all sound pretty enticing to you, you’re not alone.

Devin Lucien, DJ Five, and Brody Jenner gathered around the DJ area
Devin Lucien, DJ Five, and Brody Jenner at Gatsby’s Cocktail Lounge on July 2

“We were waiting, optimistic that things would get better when we opened,” Scott Sibella, president of Resorts World Las Vegas, told CNBC. “But here we are at 100% [capacity] and everything’s going well in Las Vegas, and we’re excited to be part of that.”

a view of the exterior of Resorts World Las Vegas
Resorts World Las Vegas.

Source: CNBC

Read the original article on Business Insider

30 million people are under extreme heat alerts as parts of the West see record high temperatures

Extreme heat warning sign California
The Western US has seen extreme temperatures so far this year

  • More than 30 million people are under excessive heat warnings in the US.
  • Parts of the West have been facing record-breaking high temperatures for weeks.
  • June 2021 was the hottest June ever recorded in the US, according to the NOAA.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More than 30 million people are under excessive heat warnings or heat advisories as record temperatures are experienced in the West, according to the National Weather Service.

Death Valley in Eastern California reached 130 degrees Fahrenheit on Friday, one of the hottest recorded temperatures on earth. Forecasters warned temperatures on Sunday could be just as high, encouraging people to heed warnings and not put themselves or first responders in danger in the extreme heat.

An all-time high temperature of 117 degrees was recorded Saturday evening at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport, causing flights to be canceled or delayed.

Read more: The Biden administration has named a secretive private equity mogul with significant investment interests in climate-related businesses to help shape the US’s response to the climate crisis

Some cities in California experienced record high temperatures on Saturday, including 120 degrees in Palm Springs, The Los Angeles Times reported. Officials in the state asked residents to conserve electricity due to the toll on state’s power grid and threats from wildfires.

Areas of the Western US have been experiencing dangerously high temperatures for weeks. Hundreds of deaths and more than 1,100 hospitalizations were linked to a brutal heat wave in the Pacific Northwest late last month.

Some Northwest cities experienced multiple days in a row of triple-digit temperatures. The heatwaves and accompanying power outages forced some people out of their homes and into cooling centers.

June 2021 was the hottest June ever recorded in the US, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Have a news tip? Contact this reporter at kvlamis@insider.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Nevada man reportedly waited 7 months to get unemployment benefits, but he was evicted and died months later

uber passenger driver
  • A report from Bloomberg Businessweek found half of those who applied for unemployment didn’t get any.
  • One recipient, Ralph Wyncoop, applied in May 2020 and only got them the following December.
  • After having a heart attack and losing his home, he moved into his car. He was found dead in March 2021.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Millions of Americans applied for unemployment benefits during the pandemic and either didn’t get them or had to wait for months, according to a new report from Bloomberg Businessweek. Half of applicants either got rejected or didn’t get them, the report said, and the wait was deadly for some.

One person profiled, Ralph Wyncoop, was an Uber driver in Las Vegas who was rejected from regular unemployment. He applied to the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, a federal program that expanded unemployment insurance eligibility to gig workers, which opened in May 2020. Wyncoop was eligible for $455 a week, but he didn’t receive the money right away and ended up joining a lawsuit.

Eventually, his PUA application was rejected in July; Leah Jones, one of the lawyers working with him, told Businessweek that he was told he needed to show a utility bill, but his landlord had paid that expense.

Relief didn’t come for Wyncoop until the day before Christmas, when benefits finally arrived. In the interim, he had a heart attack over the summer, and was evicted in October. Technically, a national eviction moratorium is still in place through the end of July 2021, but Businessweek reports that he slept in his car following his eviction. On March 17, according to the report, Wyncoop was found dead in a motel.

Wyncoop was one of millions who found themselves at the mercy of a patchwork unemployment system. The report found that only half of the 64.3 million Americans who applied for benefits from March 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021, were either turned down, or never received money.

Many Americans found themselves staring down ailing state unemployment systems as the pandemic ravaged the economy. Insider’s Nick Lichtenberg and Allana Akhtar reported in September 2020 that at least 35 states had struggled to get benefits out to workers, as state-run systems were overwhelmed by an unprecedented number of claims.

Some senators have seized on these state-system failures to call for permanent reforms to the UI system, with Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon and Michael Bennet of Colorado introducing a plan that would beef up benefits and modernize the system’s infrastructure. Such legislation has not yet passed in Congress.

Even as some jobless workers struggled to access any aid, over half of the states in the US have opted to cut off enhanced federal benefits early. That decision – which governors have said is meant to compel workers back into the workforce amidst labor market tightness – will impact an estimated 4 million Americans. For many of those who are on programs like PUA, which made gig workers like Wyncoop eligible for aid, benefits will end completely.

There may be some relief for those workers getting cut off, though: A judge in Indiana recently granted a preliminary injunction in a lawsuit brought by cut off workers against the state. That decision may preserve benefits for thousands of jobless Hoosiers.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Boxer, attorney, and former reality TV star Joey Gilbert was at the Capitol on Jan 6. He’s now campaigning to be governor of Nevada.

Joey Gilbert campaign ad
Joey Gilbert was spotted outside the US Capital during the January 6 riots. He is now running for governor of Nevada.

  • Joey Gilbert was seen on video taking part in the January 6 riot outside the Capitol.
  • He announced his campaign to run for governor of Nevada, running on the promise of “election integrity.”
  • Jason Riddle, who was charged in relation to the Capitol riots, is also running for office in New Hampshire.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nevada attorney and former boxing champion Joey Gilbert was among the sea of rioters scaling the steps of the Capitol on January 6. He is now running for governor of Nevada, campaigning on “election integrity.”

Gilbert announced his intention to run for governor during a pro-Trump event on June 12 at the Ahern Hotel in Las Vegas. Taking to the stage, Gilbert raised a fist in the air and called out “lifelong politicians,” promising to run his campaign based on “election integrity.”

“The most important message I can leave today for all of you is that if you sat on your hands and you censored the truth, and you peddled the fear, you’re out,” Gilbert said during his speech to cheers from the crowd, calling out “RINOs” (an acronym for Republicans-in-name-only) and “lifelong politicians.”

“If election integrity isn’t the number one issue of these guys running, then they’re either lost, confused, or too stupid to be running,” Gilbert said.

He then went on to make the false claim that former President Donald Trump won Nevada by 44,000 votes.

“We need to get to the bottom of what happened in 2020, first and foremost. And we will be having an audit here,” Gilbert added.

Just months ago, Gilbert was at a different kind of event. Per a Daily Beast report, Gilbert was spotted climbing the steps of the Capitol and yelling for known conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to join him there.

Gilbert is a former middleweight boxer and was once a national and regional boxing champ. In 2004, he starred in the boxing reality television competition show “The Contender.”

He went on to pursue a career in law in Reno, fighting lockdown restrictions and church closures throughout the pandemic. Notably, he is currently working with the far-right conspiracy theorist group America’s Frontline Doctors on an anti-vaccine lawsuit.

He is not the only person involved in the January 6 Capitol insurrection that has expressed interest in becoming a lawmaker.

Jason Riddle – who was arrested and charged in relation to the riots after bragging that he chugged wine inside the Capitol – said he was running for state representative in New Hampshire with the intention to unseat Democrat Ann Kuster. Riddle later realized during an on-air interview with NBC10 Boston that he had joined the wrong race because Kuster is a Congresswoman, not a state representative.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Photos show how people are handling extreme heat in the west, as the week sees record temperatures

People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Colorado on June 14, 2021.
People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Colorado on June 14, 2021.

  • The Western part of the country will shatter multiple heat records this week.
  • About 200 million people are expected to experience temperatures over 90 degrees.
  • Officials are warning residents to look out for signs of heat exhaustion.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
The western part of the US is going through a heatwave that is likely to spark wildfires.

People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.
People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.

The heatwave is causing a rise in power demand across much of the Western part of the country, a region that’s already experiencing drought, Axios reported. 

The heat will take the Western region from “extreme” to “exceptional” drought.

Mary Ann Brown, center, cools off in the water with her grandchildren during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.
Mary Ann Brown, center, cools off in the water with her grandchildren during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.

The heat will dry soils further and raise power demand, which comes at a time of decreased output at hydroelectric plants, Axios reported. 

 

On Monday, about 43 million people across the West and Southwest were under heat alerts.

Dogs play in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Wednesday, June 14, 2021.
Dogs play in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Wednesday, June 14, 2021.

NBC News reported that many cities are expected to hit new records for high temperatures this week. 

About 200 million people are projected to experience temperatures over 90 degrees this week.

Sarah Bulat cools off in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.
Sarah Bulat cools off in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.

About 40 million will experience temperatures over 100 degrees, NBC reported. 

Cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas are expected to stay above 110 for the rest of the week.

People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.
People cool off in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.

Even cities that sit at high altitudes in the mountains like Grand Junction, Colorado and Billings, Montana are expected to stay past 100°F this week, NBC reported.  

Death Valley is expected to reach 127°F.

Children play in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.
Children play in the water at the confluence of the South Platte River and Cherry Creek in Denver, Monday, June 14, 2021.

Las Vegas’s National Weather Service reported that they’re forecasting 10 daily records to be broken this week.

 

⚠️ DANGEROUS HEAT is coming to the Desert SW this week, with Excessive Heat Warnings out Monday – Saturday.
What to expect in #LasVegas?

🥵 Morning temps 88-90F
🥵 Potential to break the all-time Las Vegas heat record (117F)
🥵 Numerous broken daily records#VegasWeather #NvWx pic.twitter.com/GSxKsubZMF

— NWS Las Vegas (@NWSVegas) June 14, 2021

Forecasters noted that the last time temperatures were this high, it resulted in multiple fatalities.

Boat are seen on the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.
Boat are seen on the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.

Axios reported that during a period of high heat in Southern Nevada that lasted from June to early July 2013 “nearly 30 fatalities and over 350 heat-related injuries as well as temporary power outages” were reported. 

The National Weather Service has warned people to watch out for signs of heat exhaustion.

Sarah Bulat (L) and Tricia Watts relax in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.
Sarah Bulat (L) and Tricia Watts relax in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, U.S. June 15, 2021.

⚠️KNOW THE SIGNS!⚠️

Heatstroke is caused when the body overheats due to prolonged exposure to high temperatures. It’s a medical emergency & can be life-threatening! If you or someone you know is showing signs of heatstroke, call 9-1-1 immediately! #nvwx #azwx #cawx #vegasweather pic.twitter.com/BeFFssNFNG

— NWS Las Vegas (@NWSVegas) June 14, 2021

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Nevada bans ‘racially discriminatory mascots’ and ‘sundown sirens’ that were once used to tell Native Americans to leave town

Steve Sisolak
FILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.

  • Nevada on Friday banned schools from using “racially discriminatory mascots.”
  • The new law also bans the use of “sundown sirens,” which were once used to kick non-white people out of town, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.
  • Even after “sundown town” laws were repealed, some places continued to play the evening sirens.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak, a Democrat, signed into law on Friday a bill that bans “racially discriminatory mascots” and “sundown sirens,” which were once blasted nightly to tell non-white residents to leave town.

The legislation, Assembly Bill 88, prohibits schools and universities from using “any name, logo, mascot, song, or other identifier that is racially discriminatory or contains racially discriminatory language or imagery,” according to the bill.

Schools will only be permitted to use “an identifier associated with a federally recognized Indian tribe” if they first obtain permission from the tribe, according to AB88.

The same bill also prohibits the use of “sundown sirens.” These sirens were once popular in so-called “sundown towns” in the South and Midwest where non-white residents were ordered to leave town in the evening. These laws often targeted Black residents, though in some places were meant to exclude a town’s Native American population, according to a May report from the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Douglas County in Nevada, for example, remained a “sundown town” until 1974 when the law prohibiting Native American people after 6:30 p.m. was repealed. But the siren that alerted residents of law has remained in effect, sounding at 12 p.m. and 6 p.m. every day in the town of Minden, according to the Review-Journal.

The siren was briefly turned off in 2006 by the then-county manager who said he aimed to improve the relationship between Douglas County and the local Washoe Tribe, but the county voted to turn the siren on again two months later to honor emergency personnel, the Courier-Journal reported at the time.

Assemblyman Howard Watts, a Democrat representing Las Vegas in the Nevada Assembly, added the “sundown siren” provision to AB88, according to the Review-Journal.

The bill signed Friday prohibits counties, cities, and towns from “sounding a siren, bell, or alarm at a time during which the siren, bell or alarm was previously sounded on specific days or times in association with an ordinance enacted by the county which required persons of a particular race, ethnicity, ancestry, national origin or color to leave the county or a city, town or township within the county by a certain time.”

“It is similar in some ways to people who display the Confederate flag and claim that they do it for a reason that is not racially discriminatory,” Watts told the Review-Journal. “We just have to recognize that for many people in this country – and speaking as somebody who’s descended from enslaved people in this country – that is hurtful to see.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Republican lawmaker who refused to wear mask is stripped of voting and speaking privileges until she apologizes

Annie Black takes off mask
Republican lawmaker Annie Black refused to wear a mask on the assembly floor of the Nevada state legislature.

  • A Republican lawmaker refused to wear her mask on the assembly floor of Nevada’s state legislature.
  • Only fully vaccinated lawmakers don’t have to wear masks. Annie Black refuses to say if she’s been vaccinated.
  • Democrat assembly members voted to strip her of voting and speaking privileges until she apologizes.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Republican lawmaker has been stripped of her voting and speaking privileges in Nevada’s state legislature after taking part in an anti-mask stunt on Tuesday, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Annie Black, a member of the Nevada Assembly, ripped her face covering off while on the assembly floor, the Review-Journal said. She then said refused to put it back on and falsely claimed that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had said that masks are no longer required, the paper added.

In fact, the CDC guidance says that only fully vaccinated Americans can go maskless in most settings. Black refuses to say whether she has been vaccinated, Raw Story said.

The next day, Black returned to the floor without a mask. The assembly’s Democrat majority leader, Teresa Benitez-Thompson, raised a point of order and accused Black of breaking new legislative protocols, the Review-Journal reported.

This led to a vote which stripped Black of her voting and speaking privileges, the paper said.

Read more: Don’t be a jerk about COVID reopening, whether you want to move slow or fast

Black is barred from speaking or voting unless she apologizes for her conduct – but this seems unlikely.

“Trust me, this ain’t over,” she wrote in a newsletter to her followers on Thursday.

“I will not back down,” she wrote on Twitter on Friday.

Later that day, she retweeted a post referring to the “Nazis running the Nevada Legislature.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Burning Man has been canceled for the second year in a row: ‘We recognize that the pandemic is not over’

Burning Man
  • The Burning Man festival has been canceled for a second year in a row, the organizers said Tuesday.
  • “We recognize that the pandemic is not over,” CEO Marian Goodell said.
  • Last year, thousands of fans held their own makeshift festivals in violation of social-distancing guidelines.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Black Rock City will not be built in 2021, Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell announced Tuesday.

“We recognize that the pandemic is not over,” she said, explaining why Burning Man will not take place this year. “We’ve made a difficult decision, based on the best information available to us.”

“It’s too important to do half-assed, so we’re doubling down on next year,” she added.

Last week, the festival’s organizers were weighing a decision over whether to require attendees to provide proof of vaccination.

Burning Man’s pivot to a virtual festival for 2020 didn’t stop thousands of fans from holding their own makeshift festivals in violation of Nevada and California social-distancing guidelines.

For Burners hoping to explore the Black Rock Desert this summer, the Bureau of Land Management plans to keep public lands open.

“Show up as a responsible burner. Remember: Leave no trace, civic responsibility, and radical self-reliance,” Goodell said. “Be ambassadors for the Burner culture.”

An economic analysis by the organizers found Burning Man is responsible for roughly $60 million in revenue for the state of Nevada each year.

Burning Man was also a recipient of Paycheck Protection Program loans worth between $2 million and $5 million, filings show.

“We’re not cancelling Burning Man,” Goodell said, referring to the cultural movement, “we’re just not doing Black Rock City.”

“We will always burn the man,” she said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Russian national who tried to hack Tesla in a botched multimillion-dollar ransom attempt has pleaded guilty

GettyImages 1229892852
Tesla CEO Elon Musk.

  • Egor Igorevich Kriuchkov pleaded guilty to attempting to hack Tesla as part of a cybercrime gang.
  • Kriuchkov traveled from Russia to Nevada to ask a Tesla employee to plant malware in Tesla’s system.
  • The gang planned to extract data and then make the company pay millions of dollars to get it back.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Russian national who tried to hack Tesla last August in a failed ransomware attack has pleaded guilty and could spend up to ten months behind bars, The Record first reported.

In a plea agreement filed Wednesday, Egor Igorevich Kriuchkov agreed to plead guilty for “conspiracy to intentionally cause damage to a protected computer.”

In August, the US Department of Justice accused Kriuchkov of working with a Russian cybercrime gang and offering $1 million to an employee at a company in Nevada – identified only as company A – to install malware on the company’s systems. Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk, confirmed his carmaker was the target, Insider’s Isobel Asher Hamilton reported.

According to his plea agreement, Kriuchkov traveled to the US in late July, and met with an unnamed Tesla employee from Tesla’s Reno, Nevada gigafactory multiple times throughout August. The DOJ said Kriuchkov took the employee out for drinks multiple times. He also provided him with a phone and instructed him to delete their communications, it said.

Read more: The true disrupter in the auto industry isn’t Tesla – it’s Fisker

In the plea agreement, Kriuchkov said the gang planned to provide the employee with malware to plant in Tesla’s system. The gang would launch a distributed denial of service attack against Tesla to divert the company while the gang extracted data.

The gang would then extort Tesla for a “substantial payment.” Insider reported in August that the ransom would have been around $4 million.

Kriuchkov said in his plea agreement that the employee would have been paid for their participation and was offered an advance payment in Bitcoin. The DOJ said that Kriuchkov offered the employee $1 million for his role in the ransom.

FBI recordings show that Kriuchkov himself would have been paid $250,000 for recruiting the employee, The Record reported.

Tesla reportedly contacted the FBI after the employee told Tesla about Kriuchkov’s proposition. The DOJ said that the employee co-operated with the FBI, recording conversations with Kriuchkov when agents couldn’t eavesdrop.

The plea agreement says that a prison sentence of between four and ten months, followed by up to three years of supervised release, would be “appropriate.” After this, Kriuchkov would be reported to Russia. He would also have to pay restitution to Tesla, but wouldn’t have to pay fees, per the agreement. The district court has scheduled Kriuchkov’s sentencing hearing for May 10, The Record reported.

Because of his plea, a jury trial for July has been canceled. If the jury had found him guilty, he could have spent up to five years in prison and be fined up to $250,000, per the plea agreement.

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The FDA urged people to avoid Real Water-branded alkaline water after 5 Nevada children who drank it were hospitalized with liver failure

Real Water
The FDA has recommended that people don’t drink Real Water while it investigates cases of hepatitis.

  • Five children in Nevada were hospitalized in Nevada with liver failure after drinking Real Water.
  • Authorities are now urging Americans to avoid the brand while they investigate.
  • One family has also sued the beverage brand after three members of its household fell ill.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Health authorities are urging Americans to avoid Real Water-branded alkaline water after five children in Nevada were hospitalized with liver failure after drinking it.

One family in the state has also sued the beverage brand.

Authorities including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Tuesday they had launched an investigation, but could not yet confirm that the water caused the illnesses.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) told consumers, restaurants, and retailers not to drink, cook with, sell, or serve the product until more information is known about the cause of the illnesses.

In November 2020, five infants and children from across four households in Clark County, Nevada were hospitalized with acute non-viral hepatitis, which caused acute liver failure, the authorities said. All have since recovered.

Other adults and children from two of the households experienced less severe symptoms, including fever, vomiting, nausea, loss of appetite, and fatigue, the authorities said.

Acute non-viral hepatitis can be caused by exposure to toxins, autoimmune disease, or drinking too much alcohol.

Real Water says that its water is pH 9.0 and is “infused with negative ions.” It claims that this means the water “can help your body to restore balance and reach your full potential.” The brand is owned by Las Vegas-based company Affinity Lifestyles.com.

The patients all drank Real Water’s alkaline water before falling ill, which the FDA said was “the only common link” between the cases.

“Epidemiologic information currently indicates that this alkaline water product may be the cause of the illnesses,” it said.

Additional products could be connected to the “outbreak,” it added.

Real Water told News 3 Las Vegas, an NBC-affiliated station, that it would “work with the FDA to achieve a swift resolution.

“While the potential problem arose in Las Vegas, we are taking proactive steps to stop selling and distributing real water products throughout the United States until the issue is resolved,” it said. It had asked retailers to pull the product from shelves, it said.

Real Water did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Family files civil complaint in Clark County

That same day, one of the families filed a civil complaint in Clark County that said three members of the household became ill after drinking the water, The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Christopher Wren was hospitalized for several days in November after his bloodstream showed extremely high levels of an enzyme that indicates liver damage, while his two-year-old son was hospitalized with signs of liver malfunction, the lawsuit said, per the Review-Journal.

Emely Wren also suffered from extreme nausea and fatigue, but the couple’s daughter – who didn’t drink the water – had no symptoms, the Review-Journal reported, citing the lawsuit.

The water is sold throughout the US, and is packed in both Las Vegas and Nashville, Tennessee.

Real Water’s website has a gallery of photos of celebrities holding bottles of the product, including Kim Kardashian, Floyd Mayweather, and Miley Cyrus.

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