The 8 best hotels in Nashville, from a boutique in a converted church to an opulent icon popular with presidents and celebrities

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

best nashville hotels fairlane

  • With a famous music scene, nightlife, and lip-smacking food, Nashville’s always up for a good time.
  • The city’s Downtown area is undergoing an exciting boom of mid-range and luxury hotels.
  • We compiled the best Nashville hotels ranging from $149 to $334 per night in the low season.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Country music might still be Nashville’s top drawcard, but don’t underestimate the range of this ever-growing, cosmopolitan Southern city. The Tennessee capital is undergoing a boom with award-winning dining, world-class cultural attractions (like 2021’s anticipated National Museum of African-American Music), and a stellar hotel scene where a mid-rise boutique or chain property seems to open every other month.

As a hotel and travel expert, I did a deep dive into the majority of Nashville’s top-rated hotels on recent visits and found a slew of unique and worthwhile spots that both locals and travelers alike will enjoy.

Here are the best hotels in Nashville, sorted by price from low to high.

The Russell

Lobby of The Russell Nashville hotel with stained glass window and colorful furniture
Housed in a 15-year-old historic church, this Nashville hotel has gorgeous original details like the huge stained glass window.

Book The Russell

This steepled brick building on a residential street has been converted from a place of worship to a place to rest your head. Behind the gloriously restored stained glass windows is a funky, wallet-friendly accommodation in East Nashville, where 23 individually configured rooms (and a handful of “penthouses”) give travelers a vibrant respite from the city center.

Its standout feature is the airy lobby, adorned in bright colors, chevron tiles, and equipped with a free-to-use podcast room and a photobooth. Above all, it is a hotel with heart, as a hefty portion of proceeds go towards a local homeless charity.

Grand Hyatt Nashville

Grand Hyatt Nashville
This hotel boasts the highest rooftop bar in Nashville.

Book the Grand Hyatt Nashville

Don’t let the chain brand name fool you: this recently-opened Grand Hyatt is as fabulous as a top-tier boutique hotel half its size. Located on Broadway with The Gulch and Midtown neighborhoods within close reach, the 25-story hotel sports a seductive, sophisticated look from the impressive gold-accented lobby and fifth-floor swimming pool terrace to its hot rooftop bar Lou/Na (Nashville’s highest). There are 591 rooms and 55 suites, each with hardwood floors, top-to-bottom glass windows, contemporary furnishings, and marble bathrooms stocked with Balmain products.

Foodies are well looked after with seven food and beverage venues to choose from, including the “Tennessee-to-table” concept The Nashville Grange, as well as The Continental, a smash hit restaurant from James Beard Award-winning chef Sean Brock. 

The Fairlane

best nashville hotels fairlane
Housed in a former bank headquarters, The Fairlane hotel has retro-chic appeal.

Book The Fairlane

Midcentury design lovers will swoon over Fairlane, a Downtown-based boutique housed in a former modernist-style bank headquarters. From the ’60s-inspired typography and terrazzo flooring in the lobby to the spot-on throwback music played throughout the building, the hotel’s fully committed to giving guests a retro-chic experience. This extends to the colorful rooms and suites, too, with beds with velvety headboards and fold-up cup holders, and other vintage touches throughout.

Beyond the lobby level cheese-and-charcuterie joint (Cheese Gal) and bagel shop is the acclaimed Ellington’s, a gentlemen’s club-style restaurant and bar on Fairlane’s fourth-floor wraparound terrace. Whether you’re ordering a cocktail, seafood, or steak, there’s no better spot to fuel your nostalgia.

Germantown Inn

best nashville hotels germantown inn
Every room at this B&B is uniquely designed.

Book Germantown Inn

More boutique than your average bed & breakfast, Germantown Inn is one of the city’s most charming and intimate spots to check in. The restored historic home’s 10 suites — named mainly after U.S. presidents and a few presidents’ wives such as The Abigail (Adams) and The Eleanor (Roosevelt) — are individually designed, and all come with luxurious Frette linens, hardwood floors, and curtains and rugs with bright blue and pink accents.

Friendly innkeepers help serve breakfast and a wine-and-charcuterie happy hour (both complimentary) in the communal living area, and guests can relax outside in the hotel’s generously sized courtyard or second-floor terrace overlooking the Germantown neighborhood.

Van Dyke Bed & Beverage

Van Dyke Bed & Beverage
Every room is themed around a different drink or spirit at this quirky 21-and-up hotel.

Book the Van Dyke Bed & Beverage

If you like libations as much as a boutique stay, Van Dyke in East Nashville’s buzzy Five Points might be your new favorite hotel. There are only eight rooms on the self-check-in premises, all individually designed and themed after a spirit — the Beer room, for instance, has a semi-function locker and an actual punching bag with gloves (which I loved playing around with) located behind their chic bar, which hosts pop-up dining experiences inside and in their courtyard.

You’ll have to leave the minors at home, though: this unique hotel is a 21-and-up-only affair.

Noelle Nashville

best nashville hotels noelle booking
Hallways are galleries and rooms have portraits of Nashville icons at this art-focused hotel.

Book the Noelle Nashville

Based in Downtown next to the famous Printer’s Alley, Hotel Noelle is a restored historic boutique championing local creative voices. Art defines the contemporary experience: each hallway floor doubles as a private gallery, and inside each stylishly appointed room and suite are portraits of Nashville icons.

The Trade Room — a cavernous bar and lounge hangout brimming with brass details and Tennessee pink granite — is one of the hotel’s many food and beverage options bound to impress (there’s hidden speakeasy as well). Don’t forget to check out Rare Bird, a rooftop lounge where great city and river views and a hip crowd await. 

The Hermitage Hotel

best nashville hotels hermitage
A serious icon, The Hermitage Hotel has hosted eight presidents and legends like Johnny Cash.

Book The Hermitage Hotel

This is Tennessee’s most legendary city hotel address, a Beaux-Arts building that has housed U.S. presidents, royalty, and countless celebrities for more than 110 years. The stately five-star icon sits next to the picturesque state Capitol area, yet is just blocks away from Downtown’s busy streets.

All of the spacious, old-fashioned rooms come with separate marble bathtubs and showers and updated amenities. Though steeped in tradition, exciting changes are afoot: Fall 2021 will see the new opening of a Jean Georges-Vongerichten restaurant/bar in an arched basement venue, next to its longstanding whiskey den Oak Bar.

The Joseph, A Luxury Collection

The Joseph, A Luxury Collection
The on-site dining program at this spot is run by a Michelin award-winning chef.

Book The Joseph, A Luxury Collection

Hip boutique hotels in Nashville are becoming a dime a dozen; the Summer 2020 arrival of The Joseph has brought back clear-cut luxury to the city’s sleep scene. Located in the SoBro neighborhood, the five-star Marriott Bonvoy member offers a refined respite in the city, with three restaurants and bars run by Michelin award-winner Tony Mantuano (of Spiaggia in Chicago), and more than 1,000 original artworks commissioned or imported by the Pizzuti family, The Joseph hoteliers behind the Pizzuti Collection of Columbus Museum of Art.

 Rooms are elegant and understated, though have a business feel about them. The rooftop pool offers a relaxing place to cool off, complete with lounge chairs, cabanas, and a living plant wall. 

FAQ: Nashville vacations

What is the best time of year to visit Nashville?

Nashville has a relatively pleasant climate all year and rarely has extremely cold or hot temperatures. Summer is the high season and is often hot, humid, and the busiest for hotel bookings.

Spring and fall months have the best weather (though spring can be a bit rainy) and travelers can find a better hotel room deal than in the summer.

Winter, the cheapest time to visit, can be chilly and below freezing on some evenings. However, winter daytime temps can be warm enough to comfortably explore outdoor spots such as Cumberland Park, which lines the Cumberland River, and the Bicentennial Capitol State Park.

Which is the best area to stay in Nashville?

The Greater Downtown area has the bulk of the city’s main attractions within easy walking or driving distance, including the Country Music Museum and Hall of Fame, the famous Lower Broadway strip, the Frist Art Museum, and the new National Museum of African-American Music

For a less touristy area that’s still humming with activity and great nightlife, Midtown is your best bet. 

Travelers wanting a more local, eclectic experience should look to sprawling East Nashville, found across the river from Downtown. Here, it’s easy to be close to indie shops, top-rated bars and restaurants, and other places that draw the city’s hip and creative crowd.  

What are the cheapest and most expensive times to visit Nashville?

The best deals appear during winter when the tourist count is low and the temperatures are chilly; the hot summer months see a major increase in crowds and accommodation prices.

Is it safe to stay in hotels? 

The CDC states that fully vaccinated people can safely travel in the US. However, unvaccinated people should take extra precautions in Nashville as the city removed the mask mandate and venue capacity limits as of May 2021.

It is recommended to adhere to current CDC guidelines with social distancing, hand washing/sanitizing, and mask-wearing in public spaces when possible.

More great hotels in the South

The Pontchartrain Hotel in New Orleans
Read the original article on Business Insider

Videos shows a man who allegedly tried to hijack a Delta flight being restrained and zip-tied by passengers and flight attendants

Unruly passenger restrained on Delta flight
Videos show that a passenger was restrained and had his wrists zip-tied on a Delta flight to Nashville on June 4, 2021.

  • A man attempted to breach the cockpit of a Delta Air Lines flight from LA to Nashville.
  • The plane had to make an emergency landing in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  • Videos show passengers and flight attendants working together to restrain the man.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A passenger attempted to breach the cockpit of a Delta Air Lines flight from Los Angeles to Nashville on Friday, according to CNN.

The plane had to make an emergency landing in Albuquerque, New Mexico, after the man began banging on the doors of the pilot’s cabin, CNN reported.

The cockpit was not breached, the media outlet said. The man was taken into federal custody, CBS Los Angeles reported.

Read more: ‘Harvard of the sky’: Meet the woman training private-jet flight attendants to serve the world’s most elite travelers

A video from the incident shows flight attendants and passengers restrained a man who repeatedly says, “Stop the plane.”

Another video shows the man having his wrists zip-tied before being escorted off the flight.

Delta thanked those who helped restrain the would-be hijacker.

“Thanks to the crew and passengers of Delta Flight 386, LAX to Nashville (BNA), who assisted in detaining an unruly passenger as the flight diverted to Albuquerque (ABQ),” a statement said. “The aircraft landed without incident and the passenger was removed by law enforcement.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was said to be investigating the incident, according to the Associated Press.

The Federal Aviation Administration is cracking down on misconduct amid a surge of troubling episodes in recent months, Insider’s Erin Snodgrass reported.

The agency received some 1,300 unruly-passenger reports between February and May of this year, Insider’s Tim Levin wrote.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Southwest Airlines has added new service to 2 hot vacation destinations ahead of the potential summer travel boom

Southwest Airlines
Southwest Airline.

  • Southwest Airlines will begin offering new services to Florida and Montana.
  • This includes Florida’s Destin-Fort Walton Beach and Montana’s Bozeman Yellowstone airports.
  • Southwest has been drastically expanding its flight services since last year.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Southwest Airlines will begin offering flights to Florida’s Destin-Fort Walton Beach Airport and Montana’s Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport in May ahead of the potential summer travel boom.

Travel, especially by air, dropped significantly in 2020 as COVID-19 first began taking its hold on the US. But now, the travel and hospitality industry is hoping that pent-up demand and the continuing vaccine rollout will lead to a big spike in travel this summer. 

As a result, companies are gearing up for this potential boom, including Southwest Airlines. In the last year, Southwest has dramatically expanded its flight offerings with new services to locations like Palm Springs, California, Cozumel, Mexico, and Miami.

Now, the airline has added additional flights to two travel hotspots: Florida and Bozeman, Montana.

Bozeman, Montana – known as “Boz Angeles” – has become a hot destination, especially for wealthier travelers looking to trade city life for a break in nature. Bozeman also been named one of the fastest-growing cities in the US and offers close access to hotspots like Yellowstone National Park. 

This will be Southwest Airline’s first destination in Montana. Flights to Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport will take off from airports in Denver and Las Vegas starting at $40 beginning May 27.

On the opposite end of the climate spectrum, Florida has also emerged as a top travel destination during the COVID-19 pandemic due to its warm weather and more relaxed restrictions. Southwest already flies to 10 other airports in Florida but decided to expand its offerings in the state for “winter-weary families” looking to get away to warm destinations, Andrew Watterson, Southwest Airlines’ executive vice president and chief commercial officer, said in the press release.

Direct Southwest flights to Destin-Fort Walton Beach Airport can be taken starting May 6 from these four airports: Dallas Love Field, Baltimore/Washington, Nashville, and Chicago Midway, the latter starting June 6. These flights will start at $70.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The girlfriend of suspected Nashville bomber Anthony Quinn Warner reportedly told police he was building a bomb more than a year ago

Anthony Quinn Warner nashville bomb explosion
This undated image posted on social media by the FBI shows Anthony Quinn Warner.

  • An August 2019 police report uncovered by The Tennessean found that the girlfriend of suspected Nashville bomber Anthony Quinn Warner had previously told authorities that she believed he was making a bomb in his RV. 
  • Nashville police visited Warner’s property at the time but did not find him at home. They did observe the RV in his backyard but were not able to see into it. 
  • Police made an inquiry into Warner with the FBI and Department of Defense following their visit, but both organizations said they had no record of him.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The girlfriend of suspected Nashville bomber Anthony Quinn Warner spoke to police more than sixteen months ago about her boyfriend, according to new documents obtained by The Tennesseean. 

The Tennesseean uncovered a Metro Nashville Police Department report from April 2019 in which Warner’s girlfriend, who has not been named, told police he “was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence.”  

Police had been called to the girlfriend’s Antioch, Tennessee, home after her lawyer, Raymond Throckmorton III, became concerned over comments she had made. Throckmorton had previously served as counsel for Warner in a civil matter but did not represent him in August of 2019. According to documents seen by The Tennesseean, he told officers at the time Warner “frequently talks about the military and bomb-making,” and “knows what he is doing and is capable of making a bomb.”

After speaking with Throckmorton and Warner’s girlfriend, police stopped by Warner’s Bakertown Lane home and observed an RV in his backyard. According to the report seen by The Tennessean, it was fenced off, and officers were unable to see into it. They did note that it was surrounded by “several security cameras and wires attached to a[n] alarm sign on the front door.”

According to The New York Times, a report of the incident and an inquiry into Warner was forwarded to the FBI and the Defense Department. Both organizations reported that they had no records of Warner. 

Authorities are still speculating about what motivated Warner, but David B. Rausch, the director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, told “The TODAY Show” on Monday, “it does appear that the intent was more destruction than death.”

Warner was the only casualty in the blast, though several people reported injuries.

Rausch insisted that Warner had not previously been under investigation by the bureau.

“He was not on our radar,” he told “TODAY.” “He was not someone that was identified as a person of interest for the bureau. So we were not familiar with this individual until this incident.”   

“It’s pretty obvious to me that somebody didn’t do what they were supposed to do,” Throckmorton told News Channel 5.

The bomb’s explosion was captured in police bodycam footage early on Christmas morning by several officers who had been called to the scene. 

“It kind of looked like a big prop from a movie scene, all the glass breaking at once,” Officer Amanda Topping said at a press conference on Sunday.  

The RV blast took place outside of an AT&T facility and caused damage to more than 40 buildings.  

Read the original article on Business Insider

The accused Nashville suicide bomber was reportedly paranoid about 5G technology. Here’s what we know about the false 5G conspiracy that went viral this year.

nashville explosion
: FBI and first responders work the scene after an explosion on December 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

  • On Christmas morning, a suicide bombing shook Nashville. The explosion injured three and damaged 41 buildings, Business Insider previously reported. 
  • The FBI said Anthony Quinn Warner, who was in the van that exploded, was responsible for the bombing. Besides Warner, there were no casualties.
  • While the investigation is ongoing, the local NBC affiliate reported that investigators were looking at Warner’s obsession with 5G conspiracy theories, which may have caused him to target the AT&T building in Nashville. 
  • Here’s what we know about the false 5G conspiracy theories. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Anthony Quinn Warner, who the FBI says was responsible for the suicide bombing that hit Nashville on Christmas Day, may have been motivated by 5G conspiracy theories to carry out the attack, as local NBC affiliate, WSMV, reported

Although the federal investigation is ongoing, a source told the Daily Mail that investigators theorize Warner believed that 5G was responsible for his father’s death, and had purposefully targeted an AT&T building in Nashville as a means of striking against telecommunications giants. 

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the false theory that 5G, the next generation of cellular infrastructure, is responsible for ills from cancer to COVID-19 itself, has become increasingly popular. Here’s a simple explanation of the false theory, and how it has risen to influence.

Read more: Google’s misinformation chief talks fact-checking the pandemic: ‘I’ve never seen anything like this’

What does the theory claim?

There’s a whole constellation of theories about 5G, but most boil down to the idea that 5G produces radiation that is harmful to human health. Some unsupported theories say that 5G damages trees, others say that it weakens the immune system and causes cancer, and still others say that Bill Gates is using 5G to brainwash Americans. 

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, new claims about 5G have emerged. Some social media posts falsely claimed that COVID-19 is a cover-up for illnesses caused by 5G, others purported that 5G had accelerated the spread of COVID-19.

How did it start?

Suspicions about telecommunications and health concerns have a long history. People protested when 3G was rolled out in the 90s, and before that, they protested cell phones themselves, Full Fact, a UK-based anti-misinformation nonprofit, reported.

Much of the misinformation about 5G can be traced to the work of Dr. Bill Curry, who shared a chart claiming that radio waves become more dangerous to brain matter at higher frequencies back in 2000, the New York Times reported. But, his claims of risk were overblown, scientists said, since it didn’t account for the fact that the skin protects the brain from high-frequency radio waves. 

How did the latest 5G theory spread? 

The misinformation about high-frequency waves was distributed by the state-run television network Russian Today, according to a 2019 New York Times report. RT – which was also linked to the Russian campaign to influence the 2016 election – broadcasted, without evidence, that 5G can cause health issues like autism and cancer. Once the coronavirus pandemic hit, conspiracy theorists linked the two, even leading to some people in the UK setting telephone poles on fire

The misinformation circulated on social media, too. Facebook posts listing “5G illness” symptoms and 5G conspiracy groups proliferated online. Public figures like newscasters and celebrities have also spread the unsupported theory, as the New Statesman reported

Read more: COVID-19 has triggered a new wave of conspiracy theories among those who fear a ‘cashless society’

Does 5G pose a health risk?

Experts say no. 5G radiowaves are “non-ionizing radiation,” which means that they don’t have the power to damage the DNA inside of cells. And despite claims that 5G is a higher frequency radio waves, and therefore is more dangerous than 3G and 4G networks, the opposite is true, scientists say. 

“It’s a little ironic that there’s all this worry about 5G,” Chris Collins, a professor at the New York University School of Medicine’s radiology department, told CNN Business. “It really doesn’t get past the skin.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

DNA found at the scene of the Christmas day explosion in Nashville matches 63-year-old ‘person of interest’

nashville explosion
Police close off an area damaged by an explosion on Christmas morning on December 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

  • DNA remains found at the scene of the Nashville bombing on Christmas Day matched that of 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner, The New York Times reported Sunday.
  • The explosion in Nashville linked to a parked RV left three people injured and destroyed much of a downtown street on Christmas Day.
  • Warner was identified by police earlier Sunday as a “person of interest” in connection to the explosion, according to multiple reports. 
  • “Anthony Warner is the bomber,” Donald Cochran, the US attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, said at a news conference, citing The Times report. “He was present when the bomb went off and he perished in the bombing.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

DNA of human remains found at the scene of the Nashville bombing on Christmas Day match 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner, The New York Times reported Sunday.

Warner was identified earlier Sunday by police as a “person of interest” in connection to the downtown Nashville bombing that occurred early on Christmas morning and injured three people, according to CBS News.

“Anthony Warner is the bomber,” Donald Cochran, the US attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, said at a news conference, citing The Times report. “He was present when the bomb went off and he perished in the bombing.”

Federal agents converged on Warner’s home in Antioch, Tennessee, on Saturday afternoon and conducted a search. Warner owned an RV that appeared to be a similar make and model to the one used in Friday’s explosion, according to CBS.  

Authorities said Friday they believed the blast was “intentional.”

nashville explosion anthony quinn warner home
Law enforcement officers investigate the house belonging to Anthony Quinn Warner, a 63 year-old man who has been reported to be of interest in the Nashville bombing, on December 26, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

CNN reported Saturday that investigators also believe the explosion may have been a suicide bombing, citing two law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation.

Police and witnesses reported that the RV emitted an audio recording warning that a bomb would detonate in 15 minutes and urging them to flee. 

One local business owner told The Tennessean that the RV had been there since at least Thursday night.

“It’s a miracle that no residents were killed,” said Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee in a Saturday morning tweet. Lee said he and his wife toured the site where the explosion occurred and saw “shocking” damage. 

 

Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced on Saturday that the city will enter a curfew until Sunday afternoon. “This is an active crime scene,” Cooper said. “I would encourage people not to come to downtown Nashville until that curfew is lifted.”

Tennessee’s governor requested federal aid to assist recovery efforts

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden had been briefed on the incident, the Hill reported.

“The President is grateful for the incredible first responders and praying for those who were injured,” said White House spokesperson Judd Deere. 

On Saturday morning, Gov. Lee tweeted out a request for Trump to declare an emergency and allocate federal aid to support recovery efforts. 

“Preliminary reports show 41 businesses were damaged by the explosion. These buildings, many of which are historic, and others will need to be assessed by an engineer for structural integrity and safety,” he wrote in a letter requesting emergency assistance.

“The severity and magnitude of the current situation is such that effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected local governments,” he added in the letter. “As a result, federal assistance under the Stafford Act is necessary to supplement the efforts and available resources.” 

The Stafford Act allows a president to declare an incident or circumstance a national emergency and move federal resources to aid those affected by it.

‘It felt like a bomb.’

Buck McCoy, who lives near the area, told the Associated Press: “All my windows, every single one of them got blown into the next room. If I had been standing there it would have been horrible.” 

“It felt like a bomb. It was that big,” he added. Local reports said the explosion could be heard from miles away.

Police say the explosion occurred outside a building on Second Avenue North. They closed a 10-block radius around the explosion site.

Nashville Explosion
Plumes of smoke rise next to the Regions Building near the explosion reported in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning

Authorities are not aware of whether anyone was inside the vehicle. 

CBS News first reported that possible human remains were found near the explosion, but law enforcement told the outlet it’s still unclear whether the remains belonged to a victim or someone connected to the explosion. 

Local and federal agencies, including the FBI, are investigating the incident, according to a press release from the Nashville Police Department. The area has been shut down to accommodate the investigation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has temporarily barred pilots from flying through the airspace above the explosion cite, classifying it as “national Defense Airspace,” according to ABC affiliate WKRN. Pilots flying into the area “may be intercepted, detained and interviewed by law enforcement/security personnel,” WKRN reported.

Service interruptions

As the Tennessean reported, the explosion caused damage to AT&T facilities, which affected service for some in Nashville and other nearby areas, a spokesperson told the outlet. Flights from the Nashville International Airport and emergency lines like 911 access to police was also disrupted as a result of the explosion, the Tennessean reported. 

AT&T is actively working with local authorities to repair services, as well as dispatched national disaster recovery teams to fix the problem, the company said in a statement Friday evening.

“Power is essential to restoring wireless and wireline communications and we are working with law enforcement to get access to our equipment and make needed repairs. Given the damage to our facility, it will take time to restore service,” the statement said. “We have already rerouted significant traffic from this facility and are bringing in other equipment, including numerous portable cell sites to the area.”

In a tweet shortly after the incident, Gov. Lee expressed his condolences for those injured.

“We will supply all of the resources needed to determine what happened and who was responsible,” he said, adding he is “praying for those who were injured and we thank all of our first responders who acted so quickly this morning.”

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Investigators believe the Nashville blast was a suspected suicide bombing. Human remains found at the explosion site, reports say.

nashville explosion
: FBI and first responders work the scene after an explosion on December 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

  • An explosion in Nashville linked to a parked RV left three people injured and destroyed much of a downtown street on Christmas Day.
  • Investigators now believe that the explosion could have been the result of a suicide bombing, according to CNN.
  • Human remains were found near the site of the blast. The FBI is now trying to locate the mother of a suspected bomber to see if they belong to him.
  • The blast had already been referred to as “intentional” and “deliberate” by local officials.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Investigators looking into the Christmas Day blast on a Nashville street now believe that the huge explosion was the result of a suicide bombing, two law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation told CNN.

It follows the news that investigators found human remains near the site of the powerful blast, according to CBS News.

Nashville’s police chief John Drake revealed on Friday evening that tissue had been discovered. 

The tissue was confirmed to be from a human following DNA tests on Saturday, according to a report from the Federal Emergency Management Agency seen by USA Today.

It is believed that whoever set off the bomb was likely killed in the explosion, law enforcement sources told CBS News.

FBI agents are now trying to locate the mother of a leading suspect, two law enforcement officers told Newsweek.

On Saturday, multiple news outlets reported that Nashville police were investigating a “person of interest.” He has since been identified as 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner.

FBI agents searched Warner’s home in Antioch, Tennessee, on Saturday afternoon. He owned an RV that was a similar make and model to the one used in Friday’s explosion, according to CBS News.

nashville bomb rv
An image of Anthony Quinn Warner’s RV, outside his home in Antioch, Tennessee.

The RV had previously been pictured in Google Street View searches of Warner’s property, but it has not been seen on his driveway since at least the day of the explosion, reported Newsweek.

On Friday, authorities had already confirmed that the blast was likely ‘intentional’.

Nashville’s mayor John Cooper later said: “Initial evidence does show that it was a deliberate bomb being set off in our community.”

The blast injured three civilians and damaged 41 buildings.

The FBI is currently seeking information on the explosion. More than 500 tips have been received since the blast took place.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Investigators are searching the home of a ‘person of interest’ in connection with the Nashville blast

nashville explosion
Police close off an area damaged by an explosion on Christmas morning on December 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

  • An explosion in Nashville linked to a parked RV left three people injured and destroyed much of a downtown street on Christmas Day.
  • Authorities called the blast “intentional,” and hundreds of investigators quickly fanned out to determine a motive and pinpoint a culprit.
  • Witnesses and authorities reported that shortly before the RV exploded, an audio recording warned that a bomb would go off in 15 minutes and urged people to evacuate.
  • As of Saturday evening, authorities had not yet identified a suspect, but were searching the home of a possible “person of interest.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Hundreds of federal investigators continued their search on Saturday for a suspect and motive behind the bomb that obliterated much of a a downtown Nashville street early on Christmas morning and injured three people.

A number of media outlets reported Saturday that police were searching for a “person of interest” in connection with the explosion, whom CBS News identified as 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner. 

Federal agents converged on Warner’s home in Antioch, Tennessee, on Saturday afternoon and conducted a search. Warner owned an RV that appeared to be a similar make and model to the one used in Friday’s explosion, according to CBS.  

Authorities said Friday they believed the blast was “intentional.”

nashville explosion anthony quinn warner home
Law enforcement officers investigate the house belonging to Anthony Quinn Warner, a 63 year-old man who has been reported to be of interest in the Nashville bombing, on December 26, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Police and witnesses reported that the RV emitted an audio recording warning that a bomb would detonate in 15 minutes and urging them to flee. 

One local business owner told The Tennessean that the RV had been there since at least Thursday night.

“It’s a miracle that no residents were killed,” said Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee in a Saturday morning tweet. Lee said he and his wife toured the site where the explosion occurred and saw “shocking” damage. 

 

Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced on Saturday that the city will enter a curfew until Sunday afternoon. “This is an active crime scene,” Cooper said. “I would encourage people not to come to downtown Nashville until that curfew is lifted.”

Tennessee’s governor requested federal aid to assist recovery efforts

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden had been briefed on the incident, the Hill reported.

“The President is grateful for the incredible first responders and praying for those who were injured,” said White House spokesperson Judd Deere. 

On Saturday morning, Gov. Lee tweeted out a request for Trump to declare an emergency and allocate federal aid to support recovery efforts. 

“Preliminary reports show 41 businesses were damaged by the explosion. These buildings, many of which are historic, and others will need to be assessed by an engineer for structural integrity and safety,” he wrote in a letter requesting emergency assistance.

“The severity and magnitude of the current situation is such that effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected local governments,” he added in the letter. “As a result, federal assistance under the Stafford Act is necessary to supplement the efforts and available resources.” 

The Stafford Act allows a president to declare an incident or circumstance a national emergency and move federal resources to aid those affected by it.

‘It felt like a bomb.’

Buck McCoy, who lives near the area, told the Associated Press: “All my windows, every single one of them got blown into the next room. If I had been standing there it would have been horrible.” 

“It felt like a bomb. It was that big,” he added. Local reports said the explosion could be heard from miles away.

Police say the explosion occurred outside a building on Second Avenue North. They closed a 10-block radius around the explosion site.

Nashville Explosion
Plumes of smoke rise next to the Regions Building near the explosion reported in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning

Authorities are not aware of whether anyone was inside the vehicle. 

CBS News first reported that possible human remains were found near the explosion, but law enforcement told the outlet it’s still unclear whether the remains belonged to a victim or someone connected to the explosion. 

Local and federal agencies, including the FBI, are investigating the incident, according to a press release from the Nashville Police Department. The area has been shut down to accommodate the investigation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has temporarily barred pilots from flying through the airspace above the explosion cite, classifying it as “national Defense Airspace,” according to ABC affiliate WKRN. Pilots flying into the area “may be intercepted, detained and interviewed by law enforcement/security personnel,” WKRN reported.

Service interruptions

As the Tennessean reported, the explosion caused damage to AT&T facilities, which affected service for some in Nashville and other nearby areas, a spokesperson told the outlet. Flights from the Nashville International Airport and emergency lines like 911 access to police was also disrupted as a result of the explosion, the Tennessean reported. 

AT&T is actively working with local authorities to repair services, as well as dispatched national disaster recovery teams to fix the problem, the company said in a statement Friday evening.

“Power is essential to restoring wireless and wireline communications and we are working with law enforcement to get access to our equipment and make needed repairs. Given the damage to our facility, it will take time to restore service,” the statement said. “We have already rerouted significant traffic from this facility and are bringing in other equipment, including numerous portable cell sites to the area.”

In a tweet shortly after the incident, Gov. Lee expressed his condolences for those injured.

“We will supply all of the resources needed to determine what happened and who was responsible,” he said, adding he is “praying for those who were injured and we thank all of our first responders who acted so quickly this morning.”

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Tennessee Gov asks Trump for emergency aid after a parked RV exploded in downtown Nashville in an incident police say was ‘intentional’

Nashville Explosion
Smoke billows from the site of an explosion in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning.

  • An RV exploded in downtown Nashville on Friday morning, according to local reports.
  • Buildings are damaged, and three people were taken to hospitals. 
  • Local authorities told CNN that they believe the act was done intentionally.
  • A video circulating online appears to show a recording telling people to leave the area just before the explosion set off.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Local emergency services were dispatched after an explosion rattled downtown Nashville early on Christmas morning, damaging buildings and blowing out windows.

CNN reported that authorities said they believe the incident was done intentionally.

“We do believe this to have been an intentional act,” Don Aaron, a spokesperson with the Metro Nashville Police Department, told CNN. “Significant damage has been done to the infrastructure there on 2nd Avenue North.”

Authorities have not yet named any suspects involved in the explosion, but CBS reported that police have identified people of interest who they believe are connected to the incident. 

At least three people have been transported to hospitals, CNN reported. There have not yet been any reports of critical injuries, a representative of the Nashville fire department told CNN.

“It’s a miracle that no residents were killed,” said Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee in a Saturday morning tweet. Lee said he and his wife toured the site where the explosion occurred and saw “shocking” damage. 

The explosion came from a parked RV, ABC News reported. Emergency crews are attempting to determine the cause of the explosion. One local business owner told The Tennessean that the RV had been there since at least Thursday night.

 

John Drake, chief of the Metro Nashville Police Department, told a local Fox News affiliate that the area was immediately evacuated after one officer noticed an RV playing a recording that warned people to leave the area. 

The recording announced that a bomb would go off in 15 minutes, according to reports. 

“There were a number of people who did evacuate and then we know of some people, it didn’t go off when the message said it would, and so people started coming back in, and then it went off,” Nashville Vice Mayor Jim Shulman told CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden had been briefed on the incident, the Hill reported.

“The President is grateful for the incredible first responders and praying for those who were injured,” said White House spokesperson Judd Deere. 

On Saturday morning, Gov. Lee tweeted out a request for Trump to declare an emergency and allocate federal aid to support recovery efforts. 

“Preliminary reports show 41 businesses were damaged by the explosion. These buildings, many of which are historic, and others will need to be assessed by an engineer for structural integrity and safety,” he wrote in a letter requesting emergency assistance.

“The severity and magnitude of the current situation is such that effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected local governments,” he added in the letter. “As a result, federal assistance under the Stafford Act is necessary to supplement the efforts and available resources.” 

The Stafford Act allows a president to declare an incident or circumstance a national emergency and move federal resources to aid those affected by it.

 

Buck McCoy, who lives near the area, told the Associated Press: “All my windows, every single one of them got blown into the next room. If I had been standing there it would have been horrible.” 

“It felt like a bomb. It was that big,” he added. Local reports said the explosion could be heard from miles away.

Police say the explosion occurred outside a building on Second Avenue North. They closed a 10-block radius around the explosion site.

Nashville Explosion
Plumes of smoke rise next to the Regions Building near the explosion reported in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning

Authorities are not aware of whether anyone was inside the vehicle. 

CBS News first reported that possible human remains were found near the explosion, but law enforcement told the outlet it’s still unclear whether the remains belonged to a victim or someone connected to the explosion. 

Local and federal agencies, including the FBI, are investigating the incident, according to a press release from the Nashville Police Department. The area has been shut down to accommodate the investigation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has temporarily barred pilots from flying through the airspace above the explosion cite, classifying it as “national Defense Airspace,” according to ABC affiliate WKRN. Pilots flying into the area “may be intercepted, detained and interviewed by law enforcement/security personnel,” WKRN reported.

As the Tennessean reported, the explosion caused damage to AT&T facilities, which affected service for some in Nashville and other nearby areas, a spokesperson told the outlet. Flights from the Nashville International Airport and emergency lines like 911 access to police was also disrupted as a result of the explosion, the Tennessean reported. 

AT&T is actively working with local authorities to repair services, as well as dispatched national disaster recovery teams to fix the problem, the company said in a statement Friday evening.

“Power is essential to restoring wireless and wireline communications and we are working with law enforcement to get access to our equipment and make needed repairs. Given the damage to our facility, it will take time to restore service,” the statement said. “We have already rerouted significant traffic from this facility and are bringing in other equipment, including numerous portable cell sites to the area.”

In a tweet shortly after the incident, Gov. Lee expressed his condolences for those injured.

“We will supply all of the resources needed to determine what happened and who was responsible,” he said, adding he is “praying for those who were injured and we thank all of our first responders who acted so quickly this morning.”

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A parked RV exploded in downtown Nashville and sent 3 people to a hospital in an incident authorities say was ‘intentional’

Nashville Explosion
Smoke billows from the site of an explosion in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning.

  • An RV exploded in downtown Nashville on Friday morning, according to local reports.
  • Buildings are damaged, and three people were taken to hospitals. There are no reports of critical injuries yet.
  • Local authorities told CNN that they believe the act was done intentionally.
  • A video circulating online appears to show a recording telling people to leave the area just before the explosion set off.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Local emergency services were dispatched after an explosion in downtown Nashville early on Christmas morning, which damaged buildings and blew out windows.

CNN reported that authorities said they believe the incident was done intentionally.

“We do believe this to have been an intentional act,” Don Aaron, a spokesperson with the Metro Nashville Police Department, told CNN. “Significant damage has been done to the infrastructure there on 2nd Avenue North.”

At least three people have been transported to hospitals, CNN reported. There aren’t yet any reports of critical injuries, a representative of the Nashville fire department told CNN.

CBS reported that human remains were found near the explosion, but law enforcement sources told the outlet it’s still unclear if the remains belonged to an innocent victim or someone connected to the explosion. 

The explosion came from a parked RV, ABC News reported. Emergency crews are attempting to determine the cause of the explosion. One local business owner told The Tennessean that the RV had been there since at least Thursday night.

Chief John Drake of the Metro Nashville Police Department told a local Fox News affiliate that the area was immediately evacuated after one officer noticed an RV playing a recording that warned people to leave the area. 

The recording announced that a bomb would go off in 15 minutes, according to reports.. 

“There were a number of people who did evacuate and then we know of some people, it didn’t go off when the message said it would and so people started coming back in, and then it went off,” Nashville Vice Mayor Jim Shulman told CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

Nashville Explosion
Plumes of smoke rise next to the Regions Building near the explosion reported in the area on Friday, Dec. 25, 2020 in Nashville, Tenn. Buildings shook in the immediate area and beyond after a loud boom was heard early Christmas morning

Buck McCoy, who lives near the area, told the Associated Press: “All my windows, every single one of them got blown into the next room. If I had been standing there it would have been horrible.” 

“It felt like a bomb. It was that big,” he added. Local reports said the explosion could be heard from miles away.

Police say the explosion occurred outside a building on Second Avenue North. They closed a 10-block radius around the explosion site.

Authorities are not aware of whether anyone was inside the vehicle. 

Local and federal agencies, including the FBI, are investigating the incident, according to a press release from the Nashville Police Department. The area has been shut down to accommodate the investigation.

In a tweet shortly after the incident, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee expressed his condolences for those injured.

“We will supply all of the resources needed to determine what happened and who was responsible,” he said, adding he is “praying for those who were injured and we thank all of our first responders who acted so quickly this morning.”

President Donald Trump has been briefed on the incident and “will continue to receive regular updates,” said White House spokesperson Judd Deere. “The President is grateful for the incredible first responders and praying for those who were injured.”

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates.

Read the original article on Business Insider